Traversers and train lifts?

Does anyone know of published designs on the web for traversers
and train lifts? I'm getting arthritic and need to have the steaming up
area for my garden railway at table height, and then some means of lowering
the complete train (say, up to 6 feet in length) down to the running
rails which are at ground level.
What I have in mind is a horizontal traverser at table level, which then
morphs to be a vertical traverser at the edge of the table.
It's always easier to crib off someone else's design!
Reply to
Phil O. Sopher
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Apologies, but the answer came to me as soon as I had pressed "Send"!
The idea must have been on my back burner when I was sidetracked by composing my query.
The answer is to contrive of a fork-lift truck mechanism that is constrained to run on its own rails set at just below ground level so that the lowered position of the rail bed is at ground level.
The horizontal movement of the truck (when the rail bed is set high) forms the traverser; the vertical movement of the truck forms the lift.
Reply to
Phil O. Sopher
There has been some talk on the MERG
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group of the use of a Paternoster lift design to do this.
Richard
Reply to
Dickie mint
Perhaps Jane will tell you if a helix is possible, certainly seems simpler to build and maintain.
cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
The REV P. Denny had one made of Maccano for his 4mm I assume late 50s. So a Dexion version might do
Reply to
Trev
We had one of those in the new Engineering Building at Oxford in 1963. You had to be pretty sharp stepping on and off.
I've seen automated car parks with a system of horizontal and vertical lifts - there was one in Japan for bicycles shown on TV.
Reply to
MartinS
In article , MartinS writes
Also in the Biochemistry Department a few blocks away, in the early 70s.
Contrary to urban myth, it *was* safe to go around the top - DAMHIKT.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
There was one in the Uni library. The cognoscenti amongst us would persuade our timid friends that it was quite safe to go over the top, which we would demonstrate, only to re-appear on the way down doing a handstand!
Reply to
Phil O. Sopher
Helices are certainly possible in OO, and in Scalextric as we saw on James May's prog. on BBC2 last night, but I'm not so sure in a larger scale due to the required radius of the track and the limited space available in the garden. If it were me, I'd raise all the track to the height of the steaming-up area.
Why do you need a traverser element to your design? Why not move the train directly onto the lift from the steaming-up area? I assume your design includes safeguards to prevent things falling from a great height onto the ground?
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
It all seems so much hard work. Would be tempted to put a low seat at the position of the loco and steps to hole for feet under track.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
I used a diameter of 8 feet, but that's because I had the space. Take a look at my web pages, where there are more details.
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Reply to
Jane Sullivan
In message , Jane Sullivan writes
Thanks, some nice stuff on there I like the Garret, pity I don't have the space to do justice to one.
8ft is way too big for the space I have available (~12ft wide, and I have to be able to get through the middle of that), I would think 4ft maximum (single track).
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian

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