Triang Series 3 Track

I have some old series 3 track and series 3 rolling stock etc.
Can I interface it with series 6 track (if so how) and can the old trains run on
it?
Reply to
mick
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Series 3 - is that one of the very early ones with a grey base & moulded-in ballast? If not, you may be able to connect it to System 6 using the same adaptor rail that joins System 6 to Super 4. Not sure if this bit of track is still made by Hornby, though you may be able to get one S/H or old stock. I've a feeling that locos/stock built to run on Series 3 may have wheels a touch too coarse for System 6, though.
David E. Belcher
Reply to
David E. Belcher
"David E. Belcher" wrote
No, Series 2 was the track with the grey base. System 3 had black (or very dark brown) sleepers which were widely spaced. I believe System 3 rail was the same section as Super 4, so it should be possible to join it as you suggested.
Having said that I can't think why anyone would want to use track as course as System 3, or even Super 4 for that matter.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote
Of course I meant coarse! :-(
John.
Reply to
John Turner
In message , mick writes
Much heavier rail section for one thing although Triang-Hornby, as was, used to do a converter track for Super 4 to Series 6 but I do not think that this compensated for the difference in sleeper base thickness.
Bear in mind that the old Series 3 track has completely different geometry to all that followed - different straight track lengths and radii for curves.
Some might regard it as useful for narrow gauge.
Also it was only available in steel - so keeping it clean is an issue!
The rolling stock should be OK on current code 100 rail but you may need to look at back-to-back dimensions for the wheels.
Reply to
Bill Campbell
I have series 3 track and just wanted to add some more track to it - so I wnated to know if I could interface it with more modern track. I could obviously buy some series 3. What do you mean by coarse track?
Reply to
mick
Series 3 track hasnt been made since the 60's, although I spose you might find some on E Bay. System 6 track is code 100, more accurate track is code 75. The code # reletes to the height of the track. Series 3 was code 150 or 200 (guessing) which makes it very out of scale or coarse.It was OK for the locos of the day with large flanges on the wheels, which of corse will not run on modern code 75 track, although I have run modern Hornby on Series 4 OKish. Hope this helps Rob
Reply to
Rob
125.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
"Rob" wrote
Grossly over-scale.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Oh no I didnt!
Reply to
Rob
Oh, yes you did!
(Sorry, love panto)
Steve Newcastle NSW Aust
Reply to
Steve Magee
In article , Bill Campbell writes
It did and, Series 3 and Super 4 were the same height. The converter rails were first made in 1966 to join both Series 3 and Super 4 to Hornby Dublo track after Tri-ang took over Hornby and supposedly merged the two systems. HD track was lower and had (presumably) code 100 rail and so the converter track was ramp-like. It was remade in 1970 when Tri-ang Hornby brought in System 6 which, as has been said, was lower and code 100.
This is true. One of the principle reasons for the introduction of Super 4 in 1962 was to improve the geometry without having to convert everything to 'finescale'. It was public pressure which made them finally change in 1970.
The converter track (R476) has not been made since 1983 but you may be able to buy it second-hand at swapmeets or shops that deal in second- hand models.
Series 3 track is plentiful and traders often bin it rather than try to sell it. There is still a lot around and you are usually given it rather than be asked to pay for it. The compatible Super 4 is going the same way though watch out for Super 4 points which are often broken and sometimes badly mended. It is the short rails adjacent to the frog that break away.
Pat Hammond
Reply to
Pat Hammond
"Rob" wrote
Well in that case edit your messages so it is clear who did! ;-)
John.
Reply to
John Turner

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