Steel Track Cleaning

I cleaned some old Hornby steel track about a month ago and polished the rails
until they were nice and shiny.
The bits of track have been stored in plastic bags in a cardborad box and when
I took them out today they were rusty and looked even worse than before I
cleaned them.
The corrosion came off easily with a couple of wipes from a track rubber so it
wasn't as bad as it looked.
What am I doing wrong?!
Peter
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Reply to
Peter
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On 22 Aug 2004 21:02:51 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Peter) wrote in message :
Using steel track :-)
Store with anti-rust vapour wrapper, and use Rail Zip (new discovery for me, everyone else knew it yonks ago) when on the layout - or use Peco nickel-silvered track which is Much Better.
Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
Those horrible old rails are steel coated not pure steel. I bet you took the coating off. Best action is to bin them and use nickel silver like the rest of the world.
Reply to
titans
In message , "Just zis Guy, you know?" writes
or even modern Hornby track, which is also made of nickel-silver.
Reply to
John Sullivan
I know it is a mad idea but if you have loads of track couldn't you simply electro-plate it. Nickel silver (gold) can be picked up for pennies from charity shops (in the form of old cutlery) and a simple long bath could be made from a cat litter tray.
Etching the steel track first in a light acid (vinegar in water over night should do) would also help the process...
Told you it was a mad idea but must be possible with some form of plating and you shouldn't have to remove the plastic sleepers.
I don't know enough about the process. What about copper sulphate?
There must also be chemical dips.....
I mean if you are thinking of chucking them it might be fun to try.
Pete
Reply to
Pete
You can't nickel/silver plate something, the nickel and the silver seperate and plate under different conditions. But people, including me, used to silver plate using photographic developer solutions. An old silver plated spoon would go a long way. Keep it up to smooth[:))] with Silver Dip. Needs a thin copper plate layer first. Nickel plating is a pig of a job.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Parkes
In message , Ken Parkes writes
What are you on about? Nickel silver is an alloy of copper, nickel and zinc, and contains no silver at all. The expression "nickel-silvered" which appears at the top of this message is total rubbish, Peco track is not "nickek-silvered" but is solid nickel silver.
Reply to
John Sullivan
You're quite right of course, I meant nickel and copper, the zinc drops out of solution, brain shut down temporarily. And certainly Peco rail is solid nickel-silver, but "nickel-silvered" is a valid process where the molten alloy is coated onto a base metal either before of after forming.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Parkes
Such a mad idea that it was completely wrong :o))
Pete
Reply to
Pete
I might try copper plating it. I think steel is more reactive than copper so dunking it in Copper Sulphate solution for a long time should copper plate the track.
Any chemists here?!
Peter Cheap Train Tickets:
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Reply to
Peter
Found a reasonably easy to understand site here:
FAQ:
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Some stuff on electroless copper plating of steel:
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Pete
Reply to
Pete
The day you stop trying out mad ideas to see what happens, you may as well be dead. There are already enough boreing people who only bet on certainties.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Parkes
Ken.
As a kid I had a habit of sticking fingers in electrical sockets... certainly knew I was live then :)
Pete
Reply to
Pete
Me too! Those kids hardly ever let me do it to them more than once! :-)
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter

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