What are Hornby up to ?



Back in the 1950s and 60s, Graham Farish made OO railway models. They were more expensive than Hornby, and many diecasts crumbled due to the use of poor quality mazac. They got into the N Scale market in the 1970s.
Grafar was taken over by Kader in 2001 and absorbed by Bachmann Industries, which moved production to China.
--
Martin S.

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wrote:

I've wondered if a coach I have is one of those. Acquired it years ago when I was still at school. Unpainted black plastic body with a reddish brown tin roof with no detail on it. Diecast Metal bogies and a sort of tension lock coupler that differs from the Tri-ang ones that were on my other coaches. Metal strip on the underside appears to be there for strength or a weight. No corridor connections and no makers name I can see easily either. The diecast bogies seem to have remained intact so far.
G.Harman
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On 31/01/2012 22:27, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Sounds very much like a Graham Farish one to me. They did make a non-corridor coach with a tin roof, ca. 1960, and their couplers were as you describe.
Charlie
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On 31/01/2012 20:03, MartinS wrote:

Indeed they did. I have (in bad condition) one of their 'Black Fives' with a motor in the tender driving the loco through a flexible shaft. I doubt whether these products could be described as 'high-end' though, although their Pullmans had a good reputation IIRC.
They also made flexible 00 track 'Formoway' which was advertised on the back of magazines. Looked OK, but the points gad huge 'dead frogs.'

Yes - I had some of their first wagons from about 1970, which were undecorated, but you could get a set of dry-print transfers for them.
I've dabbled in N a few times, but never really felt happy with it.
Charlie
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Not as much as should, hence there are boxed trainsets in every toy cupboard and loft :-) Toys are expensive nowadays, just look at a computer game - GBP40 average when first released, which is when children need it. Not a big package under the xmas tree on its own.
Cheers, Simon
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On 22/01/2012 23:34, simon wrote:

No, in real terms toys are /cheap/ nowadays. 40 quid would get a lot more than it used to. In ye good old days a computer game would cost the equivalent of millions, and rather than shooting up aliens you could only use it to read German government communications...
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK

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Perhaps, but then are we talking about apples or pears :-)
Cheers, Simon
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On 23/01/2012 23:04, simon wrote:

Well, Apples might be a bit more expensive.
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK

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Depends what you mean by "dealers". Small traders will buy through distributors or wholesalers. When I looked at a local independent toyshop that was for sale they bought most stuff through a group buying scheme. A bit like wholesale but you had to be a member of the scheme and collect from the warehouse yourself.
The "top 20" probably accounts for quite a proportion of Hornby's sales.
It's usual in many industries to have some direct accounts and some "channel" accounts.
MBQ
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wrote:

Depends what you mean by "dealers". Small traders will buy through distributors or wholesalers. When I looked at a local independent toyshop that was for sale they bought most stuff through a group buying scheme. A bit like wholesale but you had to be a member of the scheme and collect from the warehouse yourself.
The "top 20" probably accounts for quite a proportion of Hornby's sales.
It's usual in many industries to have some direct accounts and some "channel" accounts.
MBQ
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Well Hornby list 850 stockists on their site for UK and ROI .... http://www.hornby.com/stockists/england /
But am not talking about volume, its visibility. Think of it as a type of advertising. Go to toy shop to buy present, not decided what present, see trainset .......
Cheers, Simon
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How is that affected by Hornby's choice of who they supply direct v. via distribution channels?
MBQ
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