Which is correct - GF or Minitrix



Isn't it what you like that matters? Not what someone else likes.
(kim)
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Kim,
Good point, but if you are trying to model something in true scale, then fitting something that is over or under scale just won't look right (more so when you know its wrong) especially if the two items are side by side.
I always preferred the look of Peco and Minitrix as IMO the metal wheels on Farish products always looked "toyish" and un-realistic.
Malcolm
kim wrote:

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N scale (or N gauge) is a popular model railway standard, allowing hobbyists to build layouts that take up less space than HO scale, or pack longer runs containing more detail into a similar amount of space. The name is an abbreviation for Nine millimetres. It is also sometimes called "2 mm to the foot," (1:160) in reference to its scale. Another early N scale was also known as "OOO" or "Treble-O" in reference to O and OO scales and was 1:152.
N scale uses 9 mm gauge track ("N gauge'), and a scale of 1:160 for most of the world. In the United Kingdom where a scale of 1:148 is used because of problems early on in fitting mechanisms into smaller British trains. In Japan 1:150 is used for most trains and trams, to proportion the trains correctly for Japan's 3'6" track gauge, while 1:160 is used for standard gauge Shinkansen (Bullet Train) models.
Although trains and accessories of similar gauge and/or scale existed as early as 1927, modern N scale appeared in 1962. Unlike other scales and gauges, which were de facto standards at best, within two years N scale defined the gauge, voltage, and polarity of track, as well as the height and type of couplers. Electrically N scale uses the same voltage and power levels as HO scale, that is 12v dc for train control and 16v ac for accessories such as point motors. The standard coupling is known as a 'Rapido' coupler and supports automatic coupling and uncoupling. American modellers are increasingly using a different coupler system by Microtrains which also permits delayed uncoupling.
N scale is second only to HO scale in popularity as a modelling scale worldwide. In Japan where space in homes is more limited N scale is the most popular scale and HO scale is considered large. A typical small N scale model railway occupies about 2' x 3' with a layout capable of handling large realistic train lengths occupying about 6' x 2'.
N gauge track and components are also used with larger scales, in particular HOe and 009 scale for modelling narrow gauge railways.
2 mm scale A fair number of modellers in the United Kingdom use 2 mm scale, an older standard than N scale. 2 mm scale, as the name implies, is scaled at 2 mm to the foot (1.152) with a 9.42 mm track gauge. Exact scale track and wheels are used rather than the somewhat coarser N gauge standards.
[edit] OOO models In 1961 Lone Star introduced some of the very first (1:160) N scale models branded as Treble-O (OOO) into the United Kingdom. The original models were push along but electrified models followed shortly afterwards. These used a different coupling based on a shrunken OO scale coupling. The OOO couplings and specifications have long since been replaced by N scale.
[edit] External Links a.. The N Gauge Society b.. The Modern Area Group of the N Gauge Society c.. The 2mm Scale Association d.. Ntrak Society [edit] Groups a.. N gauge discussion group mainly interested in modeling British outline b.. discussion group mainly interested in modeling modern British outline Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N_scale "
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Except, of course, it's scale isn't 2 mm. to the foot, but 1.9 mm. to the foot.

--
Jane
OO in the garden http://www.yddraiggoch.demon.co.uk/railway/railway.html
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