Brought home a $9.99 Hobart CyberTig II welder

I am back home after bringing in a hobart cybertig II welder. I won it for $9.99 on eBay.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemV15601498
The seller went absolutely OUT OF HIS WAY. It was amazing. First of all, he just GAVE me a remote control that he thought he did not have when selling this cybertig, but later he found it and just gave it to me. He spent perhaps 20 minutes trying to help me crane this cybertig up into my truck. All for a pittance $9.99.
He also gave me a bunch of junk steel scraps, looking like maybe some was stainless.
I want this guy to be my son's father in law. I was so touched that I just gave him extra $10 after all was done.
The remote control has a pot with a counter, and can set amperage precisely, as a number. It has start and stop and EMERGENCY STOP buttons. Since this cybertig can be programmed for a certain start and stop sequence, stop performs end of sequence, whereas EMERGENCY STOP simply cuts everything off. Besides having a remote control, this cybertig also has adapters for inert gas and water, so I guess I can use a water cooled torch.
That's the good news. The bad news is that this cybertig is just so damn big. About 2 feet by 4 feet by 3 feet tall. I hope that it fits into my garage somehow. I want to put in on casters. I will check its wiring tonight and will vacuum it inside a little bit. It will probably need rewiring for 230V from 460. If it works, it will definitely make a very fine tig and stick welder.
i
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Ignoramus5411 wrote:

Nice score! I just scored a chain hoist on eBay for 12 when it sells new for 300, and I was pleased with that, but I think it's easily outdone by your score. I hope it all works okay - keep us informed!
By the way, why does a welder need a remote control? Is it so you can adjust the current while you're welding, or what? It seems a funny idea.
Almost like those Sun computer monitors which used to have a remote control. I hated those because I kept getting them free, but the remote was always missing. Now I have the later model which doesn't need a remote :-).
Chris
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 00:15:26 +0000 (UTC), Christopher Tidy

I definitely will keep you posted. Great job on the chain hoist.

That's right. Please understand that the depth of my TIG knowledge is limited to having read two thirds of of the free tig welding book by Miller. (highly recommended).
There are two advantages of this tig machine. One is that a whole tig cycle can be programmed. Preflooding by argon, arc start, upslope of the rising current, pulsed DC welding (not the same as squarewave AC, pulsed DN always flows in one direction), downslope and cooling can be all programmed.
Second is that amperage can be set locally, and current can be started and stopped locally. That's nice because I do not have to leave my work to change settings and do not have to leave electrode under power.
i
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Ignoramus5411 wrote:

I hope the welder's okay. The chain hoist arrived today. Not such a great deal really; a bit of an anti-score. Some previous owner has obviously neglected to lubricate the mechanism so it's rather slack. Also, it's not as easy to use as others I've used in the past. Somehow I think I'll be looking for another. Oh well, you win some, you lose some!
Chris
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On Fri, 23 Sep 2005 23:56:19 +0000 (UTC), Christopher Tidy

So far, it is. It powers up and responds to controls. I have not tried welding with it, since I have no leads, electrodes, etc etc. I will visit Farm and Fleet and Harbor Fright tomorrow (I became quite wary of Harbor Fright (intentional spelling) lately and will try to buy as much as I can, elsewhere). Many welding things I ordered via ebay and will get them next week or even later.

Yep... Happens to all of us... Definitely the case for me... Throwing away the bad stuff is a big challenge. If I do not do it, I would drown in useless stuff like unwanted hydraulic valves etc (anyone wants one?). But doing it is very sad.
My other bad experiences invole a lot of wasted time. For instance, I bought a compressor for $50, a single phase motor for $10, rewired it from 3 phase to 1 phase and sold for $140. I wasted something like 8 hours on it, which was way too much.
At least you are having fun, which is great.
i

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Have you got any needle or pressure relief valves? I would need those if I were to build the hydraulic load tester for a phase convertor, and they might just be small enough to ship to England.

You probably learned something, even if you made little cash.
Chris
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 02:44:22 +0000 (UTC), Christopher Tidy

Not, not for hydraulics. I have some differential pressure switches though.

true enough...
i
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Ignoramus19652 wrote:

Alright, never mind. Just thought I might otherwise make use of something heading towards the bin.
Chris
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 02:08:34 GMT, Ignoramus19652

Hydraulic valves of the right kind are nearly always useful.

Welcome to my world.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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I tried selling it ebay, no one wanted it for $9.99 plus sensible shipping...

Haha... I am reading the manual for this cybertig now, it is quite impressive. A nice, programmable machine. I will think if there is any simple way to use it in a slightly automated manner, such as using some linear rails to move the torch slowly along a straight line (by hand but using rails), or some such.
i
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 04:31:16 GMT, Ignoramus19652

I don't follow ebay that much especially in the hydraulics section. I can't afford it for one thing. :-)

That's what the programmable drawer like both our machines have got was made for. Many of the functions are not needed for manual welding though some can be rather nice once you get used to them. I've never taken the time to figure it out but I believe that with some small amount of work it could be made to work the way modern inverter welders do. Tap button to start program for start of weld and then another tap to do the end sequence. I believe Ernie uses this when tig welding a lot.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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My cybertig can do just that. I press a button to start sequence, then it starts, preflows, whatever, then starts welding, and then I can press a button for end sequence. It has also a terminal board where 24V signals are sent for every conceivable condition. I would plug a linear "mover" to move the torch based on those 24v signals.

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On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 18:10:25 GMT, Ignoramus10467

Yes but the big difference is that the modern inverters use the same button for both jobs. That way you can have one small button on the tig torch which allows you to start the weld and with another tap of the same button finish the weld. Not terribly hard to get around in any of several ways but would require a little work.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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Oh, I see. I have two buttons on the remote, (actually three), start, stop, emergency stop. Not on the torch though...
i
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wrote:

As I recall..my CT-300 drawer has all the same controls, but as pots, but would stick weld normally without having to run a program whatsoever.
In fact..you had to Start the program via pedal or external switch to run a program. And in regular mode..there was NO delay in arc start, either with scratch or HF start.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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Mine has a TIG mode and a stick mode. I think that in a stick mode, the programs do not apply, since the notion of preflooding or postflow does not apply to stick welding.
i
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 04:54:40 GMT, Ignoramus10467

That is correct. Based on the little bit of fiddling with mine, HF works, and IRRC...so does pulse..but thats all
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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That's very nice to know. Looks like this is a mercedes of DC tig welding.
I was reading Richard Fitch's welding handbook yesterday... He said that top end machines are like this programmale one. I am aware that his handbook is quite dated though.
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 13:44:27 GMT, Ignoramus18928

The newer Cybertig II's may well bypass this stuff. Remember mines a Cybertig I and was made around 1970.

At the time they where made they where definitely the cadillac. Now days there are modern inverters with new features and improvements on the features these have.

Yep.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 13:44:27 GMT, Ignoramus18928

Here's some links to pics of the front of my Cybertig.
http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2001_retired_files/Cybertig1.jpg
http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2001_retired_files/Cybertig2.jpg
http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2001_retired_files/Cybertig3.jpg
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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