Hobart Cybertig 300

Just got a Hobart Cybertig 300 from a high school selling off their
industrial arts equipment (sad).
No manual. Anyone know anything about this machine and its specs? Has
anyone used a welder like this before? I would love to hear about its
strengths and weaknesses especially relating to al and stainless
welding. If anyone has a manual, I will pay for a complete scanned or
photocopied copy.
Reply to
trg-s338
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Hobart cybertig 300 DCS is very similar to Hobart Cybertig 200 DCS.
I have some manuals for the '200 (PDF)
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They may or may not be for your version of the programmer, but are likely to apply to the main power source.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19490
Thanks for posting the manuals for the Cyber-TIG. Looking at the power control stuff in welders is something that interests me a lot.
Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
They have pretty good diagrams at the end of both manuals.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19490
Thank you for your response. Now I have at least some useful information about my machine. What about this machine do you like ( the 200 DCS of yous )? Although without the latest "pulsed " technology, it should quality weld aluminum just as well limited only by operator skill right?
Reply to
trg-s338
Um, my Cybertig 200 DCS does have pulsing. Do you care to post detailed pictures of your welder, especially the controls? Does it look similar to mine?
I like everything about my welder, except that it is energy inefficient and very big.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19490
I saw them, thanks. I wish that the SCR firing board schematics were there too, but those were probably the family jewels for Hobart.
Thanks,
Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
Bob, I am not speaking from any kind of real experience, but it looks as though all the board does is converting some kind of signal (like difference between actual welding current and desired welding current, represented by voltage), into SCR firing timings. As such, I hope that similar boards should be plentiful.
Look at diagram 472780 near the end of the CyberTig (not Programmer) manual. You will see how current converts to voltage at shunt resistor R4 50 mV (top right) and goes into the board at bottom row, pin 5. I am not sure, but I hope that such boards should be generally available.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4546
Igor, How big is that board? With 6 firing generators, it could have a fairly large amount of stuff on it. I am interested in the details of the firing generators and the filtering on the current shunt.
I have seen SCR firing boards on big industrial furnaces, but they don't have to live in as harsh an electrical environment as an arc welder.
I would be really surprised if that board was availible from anywhere else but somebody parting out a similar machine or maybe somebody still works on them.
Thanks, Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
I would say, it is about 5 by 8 inches.
It is not that harsh, they are in an isolated compartment.
Are you actually looking for a board like that? I can take pictures of it and post them, if you want. Maybe you can learn a little bit to help you find the right one. I think that firing SCRs is easy and does not depend on the size of SCRs. They fire in some sort of "avalanche mode", where a small signal triggers complete turn on. I may be wrong about that.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4546
Thanks for the offer on the pictures, but it's not necesary. My interest in the board is academic. I already have a TIG machine that I really like. My comment about the availability was a response to your suggestion that they might be readily availible.
As far as I know, all SCR circuits work by a trigger pulse latching the SCR on until the current flow drops to zero. Triacs work similarly.
Thanks, Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
For a look at the board of a older machine you can see a pic of the inside of the control drawer on my old Cybertig 300 here.
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The board is on the left and Hobart called it a "Gator". There is a adjustment on it for max amperage of welder. The relay on the right are for the fancy stuff this welder is capable of.
The front is here (yes this was the fancy model back then)
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Keep in mind that this one was made about 1969-1970 based on the manual.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
Thanks Wayne! From the picture, it looks like there might be a couple of transistors and a few diodes along with the resistors caps and transformers. Some of these old analog designs were really clever.
All of the fancy front panel stuff probably results in one signal into the gate board - the programmed weld current value. There are enough relays and time delays for all that to not live on the board.
Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
Yep. That old one doesn't bother me to much. I believe I could fix it easily if it went out. BTW it has a metal shield cover over it normally which I took off for that pic.
Yep.
On the other hand I've got a Hobart Cyberwave sitting here that's much newer. It has square wave etc though the control drawer in it is just a basic model. It's control boards are much more complicated and are all sealed making them much harder to do anything with. I've got to get around to getting the manuals and figuring out what I'm going to do for the missing high frequency section (someone removed it after it failed apparently).
Reply to
Wayne Cook
How recent is it? I was looking at the schematic for the Hobart CyberTig 250 and it clearly started from the the same drawing as the Miller Syncrowave 250. Parts are probably availible from Miller/Hobart though they are probably expensive.
Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
I believe it's a 89 year but would have to check for sure. However here's the kicker. When Hobart sold the government wouldn't let one company buy the whole thing. Thus Miller got the welding machines below 200 amp and below while Thermadyne got the larger commercial machines (and someone else got the filler metals division). My welders are all 300 amp and thus Miller doesn't support them. Thermadyne basically just let the Hobart machines die out with no real interest in them so support for my machines is harder to come by.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
Mine is still available
Road Trip!!
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner

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