what is exactly 1 joule means??

hi all,
i just need better explanation of what is exactly 1 joule means??
i check wiki it says:
=B7 1 joule =3D 1 N=B7m
=B7 1 newton metre =3D 0.7375621 foot-pound force (often "foot-pound")
=B7 1 metre kilogram-force =3D 9.80665 N=B7m
=B7 1 centimetre kilogram-force =3D 98.0665 mN=B7m
=B7 1 foot-pound force (often "foot-pounds") =3D 1 pound-force foot (often
"pound-feet") =3D 1.3558179 N=B7m
=B7 1 inch ounce-force =3D 7.0615518 mN=B7m
=B7 1 dyne centimetre =3D 10-7 N=B7m
my questiBenchtop laser micro-welder Laserstar Technologies
60, 80 J
and then better machine is going to be like 80j,100j,150j.
is anybody can explain better, i mean ,in a easy way to imagine how
its like.
thank you so much in advance.
always respected and appreciated on this site.
Yoshi.
Reply to
yoshidesigns
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Let me try to explain what a Joule is. First it is a unit of energy, or work. Referring to foot- pounds, it is the energy spent in lifting a weight of one pound one foot. In the same manner a Joule is the energy required to exert the force of one Newton for a distance of one meter. There are also other units of energy, one, a Kilowatt-hour is the unit that you buy from the electric company and what the electric meter shows. One Kilowatt-hour is equal to 3.6x10^6 Joules. Your laser Joule numbers are actually the amount of input energy that is radiated by each unit.
I am not guaranteeing that all of the above is correct but it is what I recall from 60 years back. Good luck
Best regards,
Ray Ramos
hi all,
i just need better explanation of what is exactly 1 joule means??
i check wiki it says:
· 1 joule = 1 N·m · 1 newton metre = 0.7375621 foot-pound force (often "foot-pound") · 1 metre kilogram-force = 9.80665 N·m · 1 centimetre kilogram-force = 98.0665 mN·m · 1 foot-pound force (often "foot-pounds") = 1 pound-force foot (often "pound-feet") = 1.3558179 N·m · 1 inch ounce-force = 7.0615518 mN·m · 1 dyne centimetre = 10-7 N·m
my questiBenchtop laser micro-welder Laserstar Technologies 60, 80 J
and then better machine is going to be like 80j,100j,150j.
is anybody can explain better, i mean ,in a easy way to imagine how its like.
thank you so much in advance. always respected and appreciated on this site. Yoshi.
Reply to
ramray
A Joule is a unit of energy. The most meaningful definition to me is a joule is a watt-second. That is one watt for one second. So a kilowatt hour is 1000* 60*60 joules.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
I recall that a joule is a watt-second. However, for your purposes, the number is useful mainly for comparison on one machine with another, or one setting with another. You are not solving physics problems, so just think of the ratings in relative terms. Just as when you set the regulator pressures on an acetylene torch, you don't care how much force the gas exerts on the walls of the torch butt--you want to know how the flame will compare to the last time.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Whoa - how did electrical energy and mechanical energy come out so "round", without needing an irrational conversion factor?
Turning to Wikipedia: - a watt is *defined* as a N*m/sec, and - a volt as a watt/amp, and - an amp as "the constant current which will produce an attractive force of 2×10?7 newton per meter of length between two straight, parallel conductors of infinite length and negligible circular cross section placed one meter apart in a vacuum."
So I guess that "volt" is the conversion factor. In other words, with both amps & joules defined in terms of the Kg, m, & sec, volt is defined so that a mechanical joule equals an electrical joule.
I had no idea that was how it was, Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
One joule is the energy required to lift approximately 3.8 ounces to the height of one yard, or 101 grams to the height of one meter.
I recall that my experiments with homemade lightning produced 46 joules, or a rough equivalent of a blast from a rifle shot.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11000
Thanks so much.all. Now ,its much better and I can start feeling to image of energy blast. However I need to reserch more of this.
Winston, the site is great ,thanks.
Yoshi.
Reply to
yoshidesigns

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