X-ray Spectrometry Proves Thermite Present in WTC Debris

Professor Steven Jones presenting his X-ray spectrometry evidence from
samples taken at the WTC site. They dramatically show a PERFECT MATCH
for the highly specialized compound "thermate" (used for cutting
through steel) found in the WTC debris.
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Reply to
Jim34
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Just when did this Professor do his test ? As dust was still falling or months later in a junk yard with cut off beams or in the bottom where the beams were cut out ...
Give it up. Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Jim34 wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
"The highly specialized compound 'thermate (sp?)'" if thermite ain't that special. Iron oxide (rust) and aluminum powder. Let's see, girders and two passenger jets. After the thermite reaction and a huge fire, you'd just have iron which would probably then oxidize, and aluminum oxide. A perfect match to the combustion products of thermite doesn't prove a damn thing.
Pete Keillor > >Jim34 wrote: >> Professor Steven Jones presenting his X-ray spectrometry evidence from >> samples taken at the WTC site. They dramatically show a PERFECT MATCH >> for the highly specialized compound "thermate" (used for cutting >> through steel) found in the WTC debris. >> >>
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>> >> >> Look into it further: >> >> Watch 9/11 Mysteries: >>
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>> >> Visit Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth: >>
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>> > >
Reply to
Pete Keillor
I never really thought about it, but according to Wikipedia:
"Thermate is an incendiary pyrotechnic composition, a thermite-like compound used for military applications. Thermate, whose primary component is thermite, also contains sulfur and sometimes barium nitrate, both of which increase its thermal effect, create flame in burning, and significantly reduce the ignition temperature. Various mixtures of these compounds can be called thermate, but, to avoid confusion with Thermate-TH3, one can refer to them as thermite variants or analogs. The composition by weight of Thermate-TH3 (in military use) is 68.7% thermite, 29.0% barium nitrate, 2.0% sulfur and 0.3% binder."

DJ
Reply to
IdaSpode
Ever take an office complex and render it down to a mass spec ?
The plastics are filled with sulfur - the foams and rubbers. The rugs can give off arsenic and the varnishes... Talk to a fireman. Nightmare nowadays in a fire. A trailer fire is worse as the foam in the walls and massive plastic...
Then add the airframe material and internal hoses, chemicals used in control hoses and fuel and cleaning (blue ice..) The pool of chemical - and I don't want to think of the people in the mix.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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IdaSpode wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Add in all the chemicals found in the various janitors closets, restaurant kitchens, facilities shops... Not much of any compound you wouldn't expect to find in the combined pulverized debris...
Reply to
Pete C.

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