Decent fuel pump

My current fuel pump (for pumping fuel from the can into the model's tank) leaks badly. When I bought it (at the LHS), I explicitly asked
if it was leak free. They confirmed.
This time, I want a good one. I don't mind spending a bit, as long as I get good stuff.
Any recommendations?
--
RoRo

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Which brand of fuel pump do you currently own? Sometimes the 0-rings dry out and need replacing. Folks here can confirm or deny that possibility and might be able to provide instructions for replacing the dried out culprits.
If no answer here, go to www.rcuniverse.com, www.rcgroups.com or www.rchangout.com and ask your question there. I'm sure you will receive an answer.
Ed Cregger
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 12:04:08 -0500, "Ed Cregger"
I am not sure. Possibly "Texson" or something similar. Looks like the kind of stuff that anybody can buy and stick their brand name on it.

It leaked from the very start. I wouldn't be surprised if there are no O-rings at all anywhere.

It was and is cheap in all meanings of the word. I don't want to keep it. I want a good one :-)
--
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wrote:

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I like the Sullivan electric pumps from a few years ago. I have always received long and reliable service from them.
Sometimes I use cheap Tower pumps and they need rebuilding right out of the package (its been a while since this has happened).
You can adjust the tension against the pump's gland seal to stop any leaking, usually.
I change fuel mixtures so often that it is difficult to put an expensive pump on every fuel bottle. Hence, I stick with the cheaper manual pumps on the less often used fuel mixtures and usually have good luck with them. Of course, this only holds true on a shipment by shipment basis of fuel pumps.
Good luck finding that which you seek. Come back and let us know what you have chosen.
Ed Cregger
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wrote:

I got so tired of leaking electric fuel pumps that I went mechanical. Then I got bored with always having to fix them. I finally resorted to gravity feeds which don't stress the mechanicals I keep as back ups for when it fails.. It takes a while with a big tank, but part of the fun at the flying field is visiting with friends.
YMMV
Jim Branaum AMA 1428
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"Six_O'Clock_High" < wrote

If you have 12 volts at hand for your starter, or field charger, or what-not, I may have another solution for you, and you will never have a leaking fuel pump.
I had a friend that flew a lot of gassers, and he had a novel way to get around the fuel pump problem.
He got a rubber air pump bulb off of a blood pressure cuff, along with the check valve from it, and the pressure release thumbscrew.
He had the pump hooked up to his one gallon fuel jug's vent opening, and when he wanted to fill up, he would pump a little air pressure into the tank, then open a small valve on the fuel line coming out of the tank, with which he could precisely control the fuel flow going into the plane. It worked like a charm.
I have always thought that if I did something like that, I would use one of those tire pumps that plug into your cigarette lighter for the air supply, and perhaps rig a small sensitive air pressure valve (perhaps it would not even be needed, since you can monitor the amount of bulge in the plastic gallon fuel jug) onto the gas tank to monitor the pressure. I think a few seconds of the pump running would probably fill it with enough pressure to fill the average tank, pretty quickly. Fish tank valves, tubing and check valves could be used, and if you have a spare tire pump sitting around, (seems like I always have at least two spare ones cluttering up the garage) the whole rig would be pretty darn cheap.
--
Jim in NC



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While that is all true; gravity is in my price range, doesn't take monitoring (other than for full tank), and has little risk of excess except for some wasted fuel. I started out using it on my gassers and then expanded it to my glow birds. : ^ )
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Wow. That puts new meaning to "thrifty.'
If you had the battery already, and had a spare air pump, the rest of the stuff couldn't run more than 5 bucks, and could be used on multiple fuels, all except the outlet valve.
Myself, I could not be bothered to monitor the slow process of gravity, for that long, or to stand holding up a fuel can, or else find something to sit it on to get decent height.
For now, my auto parts generic fuel pump works fine, but when that goes, I'll go to the pressure system.
But, different strokes for different folks is what makes the world go 'round.
--
Jim in NC



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wrote

Thrifty? Nah, just cheap!
Finding something to hold the can above the aircraft is fairly easy. Even top of the plane sometimes works.
I have all that stuff and it works, I just get tired of wasting precious flying and visiting time repairing it or building it. Call me lazy.
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I'm guessing hand crank here? I think Sullivan has a good one. I don't like hanger 9 or tower. The last one I bought has been good. I wish I could get the bulb kind. I do have one for GAS.(petrol) mk
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 12:40:26 -0600, "MJKolodziej"
No, 12V electric. Sorry I forgot to sepcify.
--
RoRo

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Goedendag Robert,
Go to your local junkyard and get yourself a Mercedes or BMW waterpump for windscreen cleaning. The make is VDO, excellent quality.
Most, if not all, waterpumps do not handle gas/petrol/benzine, whatever you name it, very well. The plastic dissolves.
Prettig weekend ;-) Ron van Sommeren www.rmvc-cumulus.nl near Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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Ooops, too fast,

I was referring to BMW/Mercedes gear-pumps, not hose pumps, in case BMW/Mercedes used those too.
Prettig weekend ;-) Ron van Sommeren www.rmvc-cumulus.nl near Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 10:56:12 +0100, Ron van Sommeren

Actually, the one I had before the cheap junk I have now WAS a VDO. It was from an Audi. The very reason I replaced it, was that it leaked. It was very old, though, so a newer one might be better. I opened it, and it seemed the rubber parts were disintegrating. It leaked less and was a lot more powerful, so the replacement was a total disappointment.

I don't have any petrol models (yet), only methanol. But I guess both methanol and nitromethane can be aggressive to some types of plastic. Since windshield wasing fluid also contains spirits, that should probably be OK. But what about rubber parts and oil. I know rubber and petroleum based oils don't go well together. What about the type of oil we have in the fuel?
--
RoRo

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wrote:

Not nearly as bad as petrol Robert. A windscreen washer pump will last for years and they're probably the least expensive way to go.
I've had a VW washer pump for 15 years or more and it still pumps without leaks.

Not a problem unless you try pumping petrol. That stuff will eat a washer pump for breakfast and another for lunch.
--
Beav

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Beav wrote:

do washer pumps work ok in reverse?
--
Kevin R
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Kevin wrote:

Yes, no problem.
Vriendelijke groeten ;-) Ron van Sommeren near Nijmegen, Netherlands http://home.hetnet.nl/~ronvans /
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Ron van Sommeren wrote:

I tried one years ago that had a rubber impeller that refused to run in reverse
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Kevin R
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On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 13:49:04 +0100, Ron van Sommeren

Not necessarily. Most of them are gear pumps. They work well both ways and are also able to pull a little vacuum, so they can lift the fuel out of the can.
But some washer pumps are centrifugal pumps. They have to be mounted below the fluid level and they pump only one way. Here's one example: http://www.biltema.no/products/product.asp?iItemId 323 (you can click the picture to get a slightly larger one).
--
RoRo

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wrote:

Mine does, can't speak for all of them though.
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