Engine clean up

In my haste to cleanup an OS 61 engine I applied oven cleaner, turning the aluminum parts black. I know this was stupid since the products
says don't use on aluminum. Any suggestions on how to clean this mess up? I am cooking the parts, as we speak, in the "crock pot + anti-freeze" in the back yard. My wife has suggested use tomato juice or tomato sauce in the crock pot. BTW the antifreeze does a nice job on the baked on crap but so far (1-hr) has not touched the ugly black stains. I'm sick about this!
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The only way I know of to restore the finish is to have it Glass beaded.
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Houston Hobby wrote:

Soak it throroughy in some more, till its all black, and sell it on e-bay for $1000 as 'factory finished in matt black for performance enhancment - very rare collectors item' and then buy a couple of brand new ones?
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LOL , Great minds think alike:) rick markel
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hehe LOL THats sounds like ebay...

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Houston Hobby) wrote:

Some alternate cleaning methods can do damage to the items being cleaned. Oven spray-on cleaner turns aluminum black or dark gray and causes etching of the metal. Water and detergent discolors aluminum by turning it a light gray to medium gray mottled appearance that cannot be removed. The chemical dips can do the same thing, but usually only if left in the dip for a couple days, this problem can also occur with certain, other than Prestone, brands of anti-freeze.
Charlie
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I did the same thing and we're both stuck with it..There's nothing you can do but live with it. Lesson learned.... Good luck.
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| In my haste to cleanup an OS 61 engine I applied oven cleaner, turning | the aluminum parts black. I know this was stupid since the products | says don't use on aluminum. Any suggestions on how to clean this mess | up? I am cooking the parts, as we speak, in the "crock pot + | anti-freeze" in the back yard. My wife has suggested use tomato juice | or tomato sauce in the crock pot. BTW the antifreeze does a nice job | on the baked on crap but so far (1-hr) has not touched the ugly black | stains. I'm sick about this!
If you have a compressor, Sears sells a decent little home sand-blasting unit for under $70. It's the only way to turn your engine silver again, but be careful and don't eat away too much material..
Kev
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If that sand blaster from sears could use glass beads it would be safer. The glass will remove the corrosion without removing material.
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Normen Strobel
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| If that sand blaster from sears could use glass beads it would be safer. | The glass will remove the corrosion without removing material.
I believe it can use beads. The ceramic tip has a 1/4" opening. I've never actually used beads in mine, but I see no reason it couldn't be done, if they were small beads. Now I have a question, and don't think I'm just being facetious, I honestly don't know. Just how is it that beads do not remove material? The beads are going to slam against the surface and turn to sand, are they not? Surely this would cause SOME material to be removed, after all, it's just sand with VERY large grains?
As an aside, the OP could use, say, Walnut Shells to blast off the corrosion. There are many blasting materials that are commonly used for softer work. Some don't remove any material at all, depending of course on the piece being blasted.
Kev
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| If that sand blaster from sears could use glass beads it would be safer. | The glass will remove the corrosion without removing material.
I believe it can use beads. The ceramic tip has a 1/4" opening. I've never actually used beads in mine, but I see no reason it couldn't be done, if they were small beads. Now I have a question, and don't think I'm just being facetious, I honestly don't know. Just how is it that beads do not remove material? The beads are going to slam against the surface and turn to sand, are they not? Surely this would cause SOME material to be removed, after all, it's just sand with VERY large grains?
As an aside, the OP could use, say, Walnut Shells to blast off the corrosion. There are many blasting materials that are commonly used for softer work. Some don't remove any material at all, depending of course on the piece being blasted.
Kev =========================I'm pretty sure any media that will remove corrosion will remove some base material.
The glass, plastic beads, and walnut shells should remove less material at once and would be easier to control than sand on items like RC engines.
I've seen cast iron automotive intake manifolds sandblasted and glass beaded. Both methods came out very clean. Sandblasting left a rougher, more pitted looking, surface on the cast iron. Material removal really was not an issue on the thick iron.
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Harbor freight tools have a sales all the time where you can buy portable sendblaster evel less then $70

don't
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