Finally...

I just bought a used HB .61. I have wanted one of these special engines
since the early eighties and finally obtained one via eBay. Which engines
have you always wanted, but never got around to buying?
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
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For a long time it was the HP .61. Not sure now, maybe an old ignition engine, or replica, no particular brand.
Reply to
Sport Pilot
A friend of mine, Syd Clement (NJ), was the first person I ever saw fly with an HP .60. This was in the very late sixties or the early seventies. His was mounted on a Taurus. What was really novel was that he used a 10x6 prop to fly the model with that engine. Talk about scream!
I have always wanted one myself.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
Oh. I have that now. A worn out four bolt and a Gold Cup with slide carb. I think you can buy them new from Mecoa.
Reply to
Sport Pilot
Yeah, but it isn't quite the same.
I have lately discovered that some things are best left as dreams - unfulfilled.
No offense to Randy and his excellent efforts intended. His HP.49VT was a masterpiece and a fine running engine. As were several MECOA two-strokes that I owned and flew.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
Ed, pardon my ignorance, but as a complete neophyte to this hobby I can risk the embarrassment of asking what might seem like a stupid question. What is so special about the HB .61 and what does the "HB" mean?
I saw a beautiful engine by Fitzpatrick on Ebay several months ago. I don't know if their performance matched their aesthetic appeal, however.
You might also be interested in checking out the following article which includes a write-up on Miguel de Rancougne and some pictures of his famous model engine collection which was auctioned off at Christies for around $1,000,000. An HB 61 was one of those engines auctioned off at that time.
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Harlan
Reply to
H Davis
The HB.61 was, as far as I am concerned, the pinnacle of crossflow (baffled piston) model airplane engines. Schneurle ported engines (no baffle) then took over as the standard type of glow two-stroke model airplane engines.
The HB.61 was reputed to be more powerful than several Schneurle ported engines of equal displacement at the time. HB engines were offered with Perry Directional Porting (PDP), which further enhanced their power production.
HB stands for the manufacturer's name - Helmut Bernhardt (SP?) It is my understanding that the innards of the HB engines were actually copied, by contractual agreement, of K&B engines.
The first K&B Series 72 engines were very powerful. Later versions were made more economically and did not reflect the high power production of earlier versions. That is how I heard it, anyway. If anyone is more knowledgeable, please correct me.
The HB engines were prettier than the K&B engines they emulated with better looking castings, etc.
I owned and flew an HB .40 PDP for several years. It was easily as powerful as the other schneurle ported engines of the era. Its only flaw was that it was built in a heavier and larger .50 sized crankcase. The HB .61 was about average in weight and size. It also responded well to a tuned pipe. More than a few were campaigned as pattern engines.
Ed, NM2K
Reply to
Ed Cregger
Odd, but the HB was the last of the cross flow engines, and HP was the first of the schneurle ported engines.
Reply to
Sport Pilot
knowledgeable,
Yep. That's a fact.
I remember when the HP engines were rare and exotic. I'll bet that you do too.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
I hope you won, Kevin. Kevin? Anybody seen Kevin?
Chukka-chukka-chukka-chukka-chukka-chukka.
There he goes!
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
Got about 80 minutes until the drawing....
I wish... I can't even imagine winning 78 million dollars...
Oh, who am I kidding, I can imagine it just fine!!
Driving to my hangar in my Aston Martin Vanquish V12 and wheeling out rhe 407 to lunch with the wife in Tahoe at the top of some remote peak... lol
Reply to
The OTHER Kevin in San Diego

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