Re: Just bought an Ultrastick 60 size

I just bought an Ultra Stick 60, and I have two engines, a Saito 1.00
and a Magnum 1.08. The Saito is specified, but I live in Colorado,
where engines lose 30% of their power, and wings lose 30% of their
lift. The Maggie is heavier, but also puts out 3 b.h.p.
Any ideas?
--
cjbart
Chris Bart
Arvada, CO
"A mile up, it better fly well, or it won't fly at all."
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Thanks for the in-depth commentary. You make a compelling argument for the Saito 100, which is new, over the Magnum 1.08, which is used. I have been thinking a lot about the smoothness (or lack thereof) of the power curve on the Maggie, and was planning to put it on the test stand for some checks. Now I think I'll go with the Saito.
I have seen some of these built up with the servos mounted exteranlly, at the rear, a la the UCD3D, and I was planning to do that. I will run a five cell 1000 maH battery, and I thought I could move that and the receiver around until I got a good CG.
Thoughts?
Chris Bart
P.S.: Wish I had the Futaba 8-channel. I've got the six, and will be able to Micky-mouse some of the special features, but not all. My thought was to put the ailerons on one channel, and the flaps on two more, and program from there. Not the same as the 8-channel...
-- cjbart
Chris Bart Arvada, CO
"A mile up, it better fly well, or it won't fly at all." ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Posted from the RCGroups.com Discussion Forums. Visit us at
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cjbart
Yes you can, but with flaps fully deflected down and ailerons fully deflected up, when giving aileron input you are only reducing the deflection on one side rather than moving one side up and the other down. The crow was not meant for fast aerobatics, the whole point of it is to slow down the airplane by adding a lot of drag, but still maintain a lot of lift.
One thing you could do, if you transmitter is capable is to have the crow deflection decrease with increased throttle. So if you want to do a quick roll, bump the throttle and do your roll.
Reply to
Normen Strobel
I have the US 60 with the Saito 100 mounted. mounted the battery half way between the trailing edge of the wing, and the rear end. cut a compartment, in the bottom and made a tray to hold a 4 cell, 1500 ma battery. Built a little door held on with latches so that i can get to battery easily and quickly. it balances perfectly. no extra weight required. the servos are mounted in the normal place. i can tell you this is a good setup, power wise. The Saito 100 is awesome on this plane. it will hover at 1/4 throttle and then pull out of hover, .... straight up.....with gusto!!!.the US 60 is so stable ..... it will fly so slowly that it looks like it is going to fall out of the air.... quickly became my favorite bird. the Saito 100 is my fav engine .. very strong and reliable.
Bruce
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Reply to
Bruce_C.
I have the same setup, except I put one servo in the tail, and still had to add weight in the tail. I think this is because I used a heavy vibration mount which also pushed the motor further forward. What prop are you using, and are you using the stock motor mount?
Reply to
Normen Strobel
I am using a Top Flite 14x6 wood prop ... very light in weight. For a motor mount, I used a Great Planes adjustable fiber mount .. also light in weight. I put the motor as far back as i could. it just barely misses hitting the firewall. Also mounted the fuel tank as far to the rear as i could and still keep it in the proper compartment... the rear of the fuel tank is about even with the leading edge of the wing as far back as i could get it without rubbing on the frame.
Bruce_C
> I have the same setup, except I put one servo in the tail, and still had to > add weight in the tail. I think this is because I used a heavy vibration > mount which also pushed the motor further forward. What prop are you > using, and are you using the stock motor mount? > > -- > Normen Strobel > snipped-for-privacy@zoominternet.nospam.net
> > I have the US 60 with the Saito 100 mounted. mounted the battery half > > way between the trailing edge of the wing, and the rear end. cut a > > compartment, in the bottom and made a tray to hold a 4 cell, 1500 ma > > battery. Built a little door held on with latches so that i can get to > > battery easily and quickly. it balances perfectly. no extra weight > > required. the servos are mounted in the normal place. i can tell you > > this is a good setup, power wise. The Saito 100 is awesome on this > > plane. it will hover at 1/4 throttle and then pull out of hover, .... > > straight up.....with gusto!!!.the US 60 is so stable ..... it will fly > > so slowly that it looks like it is going to fall out of the air.... > > quickly became my favorite bird. the Saito 100 is my fav engine .. > > very strong and reliable. > > > > > > Bruce > > > >
> > > Thanks for the in-depth commentary. You make a compelling argument for > > > the Saito 100, which is new, over the Magnum 1.08, which is used. I > > > have been thinking a lot about the smoothness (or lack thereof) of the > > > power curve on the Maggie, and was planning to put it on the test stand > > > for some checks. Now I think I'll go with the Saito. > > > > > > I have seen some of these built up with the servos mounted exteranlly, > > > at the rear, a la the UCD3D, and I was planning to do that. I will run > > > a five cell 1000 maH battery, and I thought I could move that and the > > > receiver around until I got a good CG. > > > > > > Thoughts? > > > > > > Chris Bart > > > > > > P.S.: Wish I had the Futaba 8-channel. I've got the six, and will be > > > able to Micky-mouse some of the special features, but not all. My > > > thought was to put the ailerons on one channel, and the flaps on two > > > more, and program from there. Not the same as the 8-channel... > > > > > > > > > -- > > > cjbart > > > > > > Chris Bart > > > Arvada, CO > > > > > > "A mile up, it better fly well, or it won't fly at all." > > > > -------------------------------------------------------------------------- > --------- > > > Posted from the RCGroups.com Discussion Forums. > > > Visit us at
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> > View this thread at rcgroups.com: >
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> > > >
Reply to
Bruce_C.
So, here's the rest of the story...
I bought the Saito 100, put the servos in the tail, rudder servo o top, both in pull configuration, and put the battery back in the tail The plane flew well, but dropped the nose heavily in inverted flight and popped up when throttle was pulled back.
I corrected most of the inverted flight problem by putting the batter pack far back in the tail, and corrected some unintentional downthrus to fix the pop-up problem. The plane still requires substantial forwar stick when inverted, and drops the nose when power is reduced, so think it is still nose-heavy, even though I am now well behind th published CG.
The plane is a joy to fly. I have put 5 gallons of fuel through th Saito, and it is quite dependable. It does not have the performance yo sea-level folks talk about (we fly at 5700') but that is just fine. found that the Futaba T6xas can be coaxed in to doing most of the th tricks this plane loves, including crow, which is a crowd pleaser whe I land from hundreds of feet above the end of the runway.
Thanks for the tips, and any comments on the CG, or possibly win incidence would be appreciated. The plane still pulls a bit to th canopy on downlines
- cjbar
Chris Bart
Arvada, CO
"A mile up, it better fly well, or it won't fly at all. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Posted from the RCGroups.com Discussion Forums Visit us at
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cjbart

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