Iron pour tomorrow, Atlanta

Red Top Mtn. State Park. We're pouring skillets, Noon. Be there early ..10 ish..
Dave, The Smith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, someone's gotta do nightside. Pouring a skillet involves exactly what? Well, we all have skills, built over time or not so little time.
In general, I don't look up anything that a local person has a good explanation for. - the entire bush family excluded.
Metal melts under heat. How do you make a skillet with raised sides?
Anybody mentions China will have a bad day.
TheNIGHTCRAWLER
Smaller government and massive legislation = Dictatorship The complete and total loss of personal freedom, initiative, and growth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

He is going to cast the iron in a sand mold. A pattern is made in the shape of the object desired, then the pattern is placed into a box that is then filled with an oily sand. The sand is then tamped firmly into the pattern and then the pattern is removed. A hole is cut into the block of sand called the sprue to pour the molten metal in, and another called a riser is cut to allow gasses out. Sometimes channels are cut also to facilitate the flow of the metal to different parts of the casting.
The iron is melted in a fire-proof pot (a crucible) and then it is poured into the sprue until it comes out the riser. When the metal cools and hardens, the sand is knocked off, the sprue and riser is cut off and the little crusty bots are ground off.
This is the short version.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roger Shoaf wrote:

Isn't it simpler just to go to a store and buy one?
--
If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing
- Anatole France
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, shore, but that takes all the fun out'v it! :)
Kinda like forge-welding a chain saw chain or a motorcycle into a knife blank, it's easier just to go buy a pattern-welded blank, but that takes all the fun out'v it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Johan wrote:

You make knife blanks out of entire motorcycles? Doesn't the aluminum in the engine and transmission cause problems, not to mention all the plastic and rubber and stuff?
--

Tim Wescott, who seems to be a smartass tonight
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, the plastic, paint, oil and whatnot would burn off. Most of the aluminum would run off, but some of it would remain and probably embrittle the steel. Rest of the stuff is going to be high carbon AFAIK (forged crank and camshaft, lifters, valves, gears, etc.) so ought to forge into a really neat bit of stuff, if you can fold it over a few times without all the parts falling out when you smack it!
<g>
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, you have to kinda squish all the parts back into the billet every heat or so 'til they stick. If you take a high enough heat, the aluminum just kinda runs out after a while.:)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yepper, that's been the problem with 'em, all that aluminum and stuff makes them hard to weld. But they sure are pretty once you get 'em done up.
You can get a lot of blanks out of one Harley! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.