Kurt vises fell apart....

Awl --
Yeah, so ahm doin a fixture that requires soft jaws on the back of the moveable jaw, so I said, Hmmm, what's this middle screw doin here?
and took it out. Yeah, hilarious.
So I discovered that hemisphere ditty, which presumably is how Kurt generates that downward force.
So I blew everything out with air, put shit back together, and the Q is: How tight should that set screw be? Very tight, and the jaw is difficult to move. So how tight? "Smooth" action? "Firm"?
Odd design, that moveable jaw, imo. I would have expected that hemisphere ditty on the rear of the moveable jaw, as well, or some kind of incline on the back to force the back of the jaw down, as well.
--

Mr. PV'd

Mae West (yer fav CongressShill) to the Gangster (yer fav Lobbyist):
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No man, that half ball is da bomb. Depends what your doing, but for doing average work, you should be able to life the end up on the movable carrage .100. If your doing some really rough stock milling, make it go higher. If your clamping on ground stock make it bearly move. But it has to move, it pushes your part into the vice in a downward way.
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You got it. Now how tight do you make the worm gear on a Tryoke cross slide turntable? Also the Advanced brand? ....................
\|||/ (o o) ______.oOO-(_)-OOo.____________________ ~ Gil ~ the HOLDZEM king
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If you leave it loose all kind of garbage will get under there and it will not sit down properly. I keep it just tight enough to move it freely without any gap. Jerry

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They recommend the O-Ring option to get that action correct when using parallels (User manual item #22 on the link I posted).
-- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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wrote:

o ring option? Plaease elaborate.
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    A pair of small silicone O-rings which lift the jaw a little, and which compress when the pull-down force is generated by clamping it tight.
    If you had followed his link, you probably could have read about it from Kurt's own website. The link was already edited out, so I didn't bother going there, since I knew about the O-rings anyway.
    My Kurt Anglock (bought new from MSC) came with the pair of O-rings and a work stop which fits onto the top of the jaws.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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http://kurtworkholding.com/downloads/pdf/D675%20VISE_MANUAL%20English.pdf
Page 7
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If you consider the cosign error that results from having only one end of the jaw forced downward, you'll realize that the amount is so trivial that it doesn't influence the vertical angle of the jaw's face in any significant way. Get that end of the jaw pressed down, and the job is done. And the spherical section is far enough from the jaw that it's actually developing some downforce even at the rear of the jaw, IIRC.
Kurt D-Series vises (the basic model) generates about a half-pound of downforce for a pound of clamping force. You probably can see the dynamics since you've disassembled it, but here's a drawing:
http://kurtworkholding.com/documents/Kurt_Productivity_Guide.pdf
It's a high-res illustration so you can enlarge the page to see it in detail.
Here are some torque specs for the bolts:
http://kurtworkholding.com/downloads/guides/D-Series_Rework.pdf
They called that central scew the "adjusting screw," so you probably don't have a fixed torque value to work with. Adjust until it works good.
Here's a blowup of the assembly:
http://kurtworkholding.com/series-vise-replacement-parts-replacement-parts-c-43_44_96_65-l-en.html
And here's some other stuff:
http://kurtworkholding.com/faq/index.php
When all else fails, give 'em a call:
763-574-8309 1-877-226-7828
I love their vises. I haven't talked to them for over 20 years, but they were always very helpful to me.
-- Ed Huntress
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http://kurtworkholding.com/series-vise-replacement-parts-replacement-parts-c-43_44_96_65-l-en.html
These old companies are almost always nice to deal with: Hariq, quincy, et al, even Fadal. You can tell there is an active Corporate Aesthetic in place.
Visavis modern companies who expend considerable effort to hide their phone numbers, or have useless phone numbers, with no chance of talking to management.
Try calling, for example, Bravo Entertainment to find out why they INSIST on poisoning every viewing brain in Merka with their Housewives of _____ series. Or your cable company, beyond the front lines. Or Norton Symantec, which should be boycotted by everyone. Or MicroShaft. Or Bowflex.
--

Mr. PV'd

Mae West (yer fav CongressShill) to the Gangster (yer fav Lobbyist):
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2009 21:20:16 -0400, "Proctologically Violated"

Kurt, D675 User Manual, English:
http://kurtworkholding.com/downloads/pdf/D675%20VISE_MANUAL%20English.pdf
[ 6. To re-assemble the movable jaw, apply a glob of grease to the under side of the movable jaw in the pocket. Place the spherical segment in the mating pocket and push into the grease. The grease will hold the segment in place when the jaw is turned over to replace.
7. Tip the jaw so the front of the jaw (the side with the jaw plate) is on the vise bed. Lower the jaw on to the bed so that the segment contact the hook part of the nut and rest the jaw on to the vise bed.
8. Tighten the setscrew to firmly contact the nut. Back off the setscrew turn (approx.) note: DO NOT leave the setscrew tightened firmly to the nut as this may cause improper operation. The movable jaw is designed to move slightly (pivot side to side) so maximum jaw plate contact is maintained when clamping out-ofparallel, sawed, or cast parts.
9. Your vise is now ready for use. Open and close your vise to check for proper operation. Center the part to be clamped in the vise and close. Your parts should be centered from side to side to insure proper clamping. (See Fig. below) ]
-- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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wrote:

Who'da thunk?????

Fuuck, now I gotta take'em apart again..... :)
--

Mr. PV'd

Mae West (yer fav CongressShill) to the Gangster (yer fav Lobbyist):
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On Fri, 19 Jun 2009 09:45:40 -0400, "Proctologically Violated"

It is a bit counter intuitive till you see how the vise works.
-- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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Proctologically Violated wrote:

PV, I keep mine fairly snug for the most part, but not so tight that I can't spin it closed with a 3 spoke type handle. If I'm doing two parts in soft jaws a loosen it up a so it will grab unequal size parts better. Loosening it a bit so you get side to side movement doesn't seem to affect lifting of the parts because of the hemisphere ditty.
Best, Steve
--


Regards,
Steve Saling
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Not just on soft jaws. On hard jaws as well. Anytime you are holding multiple parts the movable jaw should have a little play in it in case your parts are not the all same size. In addition, if I'm doing multiple smaller type parts I use a cut piece of file folder paper, a piece of rubber or a piece of plastic so that parts don't come flying out of the vise. Before putting the piece of cut file folder paper on the parts and against the movable jaw I wet it with coolant so it will "stick". This makes it easier for the paper to stay in place when I'm closing the vise.
Truly amazing that Mr P.V / Kriss Hogg. who claims to have "an extensive background in machining and manufacturing processes doesnt know this after all these years of machining. No wonder he has posted with his Mr. P.V. alias all these years.
http://www.aperfectdealer.com/nbnews/fall_04_vol3/story4.html
Kristofer Hogg holds degrees in physics, chemistry, and nutrition, is a Registered Dietitian, and has an extensive background in machining and manufacturing processes
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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On Fri, 19 Jun 2009 05:01:23 -0700 (PDT), jon_banquer

Can't remember ever having a part come flying out of a vise.
I have run multiple parts in vises using both hard and soft jaws but have never had to use paper, rubber or plastic to line jaws so they will hold parts and keep them from flying out of the jaws as you describe.

Defeats the purpose of putting multiple parts in a jaw if you have to cut and paste paper or a file folder to each part or jaw every time you want to load parts.
-- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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Procto wrote: " . . .jb actually makes a good, albeit stinging point about those effing degrees: The proof that they are/were absolutely useless is that I 1. share bandwidth with the likes of a diseased con artist like Jon Banuer, . . ."
PV'd, obviously well educated, knows not squat about communications or else he'd not make stupid, vapid and hollow remarks about "sharing bandwidth".
Bob (easily amused) Swinney
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He's a figurative kind of guy. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
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From the asshole who puts caps across L1 and L2 on a rotary converter, and can't explain shit about balancing the phases. goodgawd.
And writes an article on 3 phase interactions in complex algebra, without knowing de Moivre's theorem. Shades of jb's copying and pasting.
--

Mr. PV'd

Mae West (yer fav CongressShill) to the Gangster (yer fav Lobbyist):
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On Jun 19, 9:13pm, "Proctologically Violated"

This from someone who won't apprentice in a machining job shop to get the needed experience and expects to get it from a newsgroup. Hiding behind his degrees and posing as a machining expert won't make Kris Hogg a decent machinist.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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