Asking again



Adrian C
I thought that was what is needed; to be + and then - hence the *alternate* I think I need to get into how the power, the electrons, move through the system. req
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You can get 220 from one set of wires. A hot and a neutral. I believe that is how it works in Europe.
But in North America that is not how it works. Why? Because the 220 is derived from a center tapped transformer out on the power poll. I it is called single phase 220. With the single phase 220 there are two hots and a neutral, and the neutral is grounded. If you take just the two hots you have the same thing as in Europe, but you can not ground one of them like you can in Europe or you short one side to ground.
peace dawg
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

You can look at it the opposite way, too. 120V is the 240V service "split" in two by the center-tapped pole pig. It is called "split phase", BTW.
--
Keith

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

You can't run *ANY* circuit with one wire. It's called a "circuit" for a reason.

No. With only one wire there cannot be a "positive" or a "negative". Voltage is always referenced to another point.

Between positive and negative.

No, there is 110V from each to neutral. Neutral is fixed (or defined to be) in the middle, so there is 220V from one to the other.
--
Keith

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"Drain" is not a good analogy for the neutral. Even though the neutral is grounded, the neutral current still does not go to ground but rather back to the transformer supply.
RE

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Just want to thank all for the indulgence. I will read up on this and keep your explanations as a reference. I think I've got enough variances to get a grip on this subject. Once again thanks all. We can consider this thread in essence funeralised. Anymore thoughts will be appreciated but I think I've asked all I can, I'll get back when I (hopefully) have a full understanding. Thanks req
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That I can understand:
220 Volt Wiring Explained
I think its time for me to explain about 220 current and why it is so different from 110 volt service. First of all, it's twice as big. Secondly, it'll shock you more. Outside of that, 220 is really two 110 volt lines coming to your house from different parts of the globe. The up and down 110 comes from the northern hemisphere, and the down and up version comes from below the equator. Without trying to get technical, it all boils down to the direction water flows when it goes down the drain. In the top of the earth, it goes clockwise, while on the bottom of the earth it goes counter clockwise. Since most electricity is made from hydro dams, the clockwise flow gives you an up and down sine wave, while the counterclockwise version gives you a down and up sine wave. Between the two, you have 220 volts, while either individual side only gives you 110 volts. This is particularly important to know when buying power tools- which side of the globe did they come from? If you get an Australian saw, for instance, it will turn backwards if connected to a US generated 110 volt source. Sure, you can buy backwards blades for it, but that is an unnecessary burden. Other appliances, like toasters cannot be converted from Australian electricity to American electricity, without horrible results. I knew one person who bought an Australian toaster by mistake and it froze the slices of bread she put in it. If you wire your shop with 220 and accidentally get two US-generated 110 volt lines run in by accident, you can get 220 by using a trick I learned from an old electrician. Just put each source into its own fuse box and then turn one of the boxes upside down. That'll invert one of the two up and down sine waves to down and up, giving you 220. DO NOT just turn the box sideways, since that'll give you 165 volts and you'll be limited to just using Canadian tools with i
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<snip>
Drivel!
Bill
--
Private Profit; Public Poop! Avoid collateral windfall!

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reqluq wrote: snipped...
Glad you finally got it.
--
Benjamin D Miller, PE
www.bmillerengineering.com
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