GE 3 and 5 KVA transformers

Hello Experts,
I have just tracked down a source of GE transformers at very reasonable
prices.
Here's the info:
"GE has the best pricing and features (50/60 HZ is a "beefier design than a
60HZ).
The 5 KVA version is aluminum windings with dimensions of : 10.75 W X 14.5 H
X 11.2 D and 115 Lbs. Technically the aluminum has better electrical
characteristics; The amount of aluminum is equal to 120% of copper.
GE pricing is: 3 KVA general purpose single phase wall mounted- $ 244.19
each net plus tax
5 KVA - $ 339.93
each net plus tax"I have not heard of 50 / 60 Hz trafos and I don't believe
that al has better electrical characteristics than cu but it sure is a lot
less dense. I have seen a 5 KVA for sale that weighed 160 lbs.
Al cabling is used as a substitute for cu and I know it works quite well.
But in trafos?
Comments really appreciated.
rf.
Reply to
RedFox
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Larger cross section of conductor needed, more care with joints (i.e, avoid crimped connections) but cheaper and lighter than copper. It comes down to costs in the long run as the main weight component of a transformer is its core.
Overhead cable is a different animal as weight is very important. Alumnum cable steel reinforced (ACSR) has definite advantages in terms of weight, strength and cost with respect to the once used copper cable. --
Don Kelly @shawcross.ca remove the X to answer ----------------------------
Reply to
Don Kelly
| I have just tracked down a source of GE transformers at very reasonable | prices. | | Here's the info: | "GE has the best pricing and features (50/60 HZ is a "beefier design than a | 60HZ).
This just means it won't saturate as easily. You can boost the voltage 20% higher when running at 60 Hz (if the insulation can also handle it).
| The 5 KVA version is aluminum windings with dimensions of : 10.75 W X 14.5 H | X 11.2 D and 115 Lbs. Technically the aluminum has better electrical | characteristics; The amount of aluminum is equal to 120% of copper.
Maybe better thermal characteristics. The windings will be larger and as a result can dissipate the heat better. Generally the sizing is selected to get about the same resistance whether aluminum or copper. Check the transformer impedance if this is really an issue.
| GE pricing is: 3 KVA general purpose single phase wall mounted- $ 244.19 | each net plus tax | 5 KVA - $ 339.93 | each net plus tax"I have not heard of 50 / 60 Hz trafos and I don't believe | that al has better electrical characteristics than cu but it sure is a lot | less dense. I have seen a 5 KVA for sale that weighed 160 lbs.
The lower the frequency, the more readily the core will saturate at a given voltage. A higher frequency can generally be used on a transformer up to a point given other factors in the design. But 60 Hz should run fine on 50 Hz transformers, and possibly at a higher voltage.
| Al cabling is used as a substitute for cu and I know it works quite well. | But in trafos?
It makes them lighter in weight, and spreads the heat out better. Using aluminum in a transformer winding is fine as long as the terminals are attached to it correctly.
Look at 3 kVA aluminum and 3 kVA copper and compare weights and sizes.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
> > | I have just tracked down a source of GE transformers at very reasonable > | prices. > | > | Here's the info: > | "GE has the best pricing and features (50/60 HZ is a "beefier design than a > | 60HZ). > > This just means it won't saturate as easily. You can boost the voltage > 20% higher when running at 60 Hz (if the insulation can also handle it). > > > | The 5 KVA version is aluminum windings with dimensions of : 10.75 W X 14.5 H > | X 11.2 D and 115 Lbs. Technically the aluminum has better electrical > | characteristics; The amount of aluminum is equal to 120% of copper. > > Maybe better thermal characteristics. The windings will be larger and > as a result can dissipate the heat better. Generally the sizing is > selected to get about the same resistance whether aluminum or copper. > Check the transformer impedance if this is really an issue. > > > | GE pricing is: 3 KVA general purpose single phase wall mounted- $ 244.19 > | each net plus tax > | 5 KVA - $ 339.93 > | each net plus tax"I have not heard of 50 / 60 Hz trafos and I don't believe > | that al has better electrical characteristics than cu but it sure is a lot > | less dense. I have seen a 5 KVA for sale that weighed 160 lbs. > > The lower the frequency, the more readily the core will saturate at a > given voltage. A higher frequency can generally be used on a transformer > up to a point given other factors in the design. But 60 Hz should run > fine on 50 Hz transformers, and possibly at a higher voltage. > > > | Al cabling is used as a substitute for cu and I know it works quite well. > | But in trafos? > > It makes them lighter in weight, and spreads the heat out better. Using > aluminum in a transformer winding is fine as long as the terminals are > attached to it correctly. > > Look at 3 kVA aluminum and 3 kVA copper and compare weights and sizes. > > -- > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reply to
RedFox
transformer
This was the answer I had to my qery about the model # and specs:
The 5 kVA model # is 921B1055G02
The 3 and 5 kVA spec's are the essentially the same except for the dimensions/weight and the kVA rating/impedance.
Seems good to me.
rf
Reply to
RedFox

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