Nikola Tesla



I have two things to add.
On my soapbox I declare that inventors and authors, although supposedly specifically benefited in the US constitution, get the short end of the stick. In that clause no mention is made of corporations or employers. Nevertheless, Congress. in its wisdom. Except for a very small number of inventors, it is the inventors' employers who get the benefit outlined in the Constitution. Have you ever tried finding employment without have to give up ALL of your patent rights. Moreover, many of those one-sided contracts also want to claim rights to any invention developed by their inventor employees. It seems that whenever a literary work with any profit potential is about to go into the Public Domain, Congress extends the length of copyrights.
One thing about old Bell Labs is that they were not strong enforcers of their patent rights unless those rights impinged on the telephone business. At old Hughes Aircraft, many business were allowed to start up when Hughes held patents that Hughes did not want to develop.
It was Steinmetz who may have been most instrumental in making knowledge of alternating current analysis widespread. By that time alternating current had prevailed even at GE. The essence of phasor analysis dates back at least as far as Rayleigh if not before. It derived from the attempts to find particular solutions for linear differential equations with constant coefficients.
Bill
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An old man would be better off never having been born.

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wrote:

You have the right not to work for them and they have the right not to hire you. It really is that simple; contract law.
The copyright thing is a problem, though Disney is often cited, I don't think there should be a limitation on Goofy trademarks. ;-)

I don't understand the relevance of the last paragraph.
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"Live better electrically"
--
The first use of an electric chair was horribly botched.



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wrote:

What you say is essentially what I remember. I don't remember older EE texts giving a great deal of time to history and it certainly was relatively late that Tesla was honoured by having a unit given his name. I know of no unit called the Edison. I had read about Tesla well before university and I recall a book "Men and Volts" which, although published by GE, gave Tesla his dues, along with an early biography of Tesla. Certainly others who contributed greatly were not generally mentioned, Brush, Elihu Thompson, Gaullard & Gibbs- all of whom contributed as much or more than Edison. Edison is often called the "father of the modern electrical system" - he wasn't.
Westinghouse and Edison were better known-because they were good promoters and established companies .
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Don Kelly
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You mean "Eddie currents" weren't named after from Edison?
Perhaps his middle name was "Phill(ament)"
LOL
Edison is often called the "father of the modern electrical system" - he wasn't.
Westinghouse and Edison were better known-because they were good promoters and established companies .
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Don Kelly
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What Edison did that earned him the "father" title was to put together an NTIRE electric lighting system. This included the lamps, generators, metering, conductors, protection agains shorts, and probably many other things.
Bill
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Salmon Egg wrote:

Another of his contributions was that he 'invented' the research lab. He would set about to find a solution to a problem, then systematically find do just that.
Menlo Park's sole purpose was to do research in finding new inventions.
daestrom
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...

Westinghouse bought most of Tesla's AC power/motor patents and started building AC systems. There was a significant royalty per HP to Tesla. Later, in Westinghouse economic difficulties, Tesla waived his royalties to help his friend George Westinghouse. Had Tesla's royalties remained in effect he would have been a rich.
George Westinghouse eventually wound up forced out of his company (which was originally based on a major innovation - railroad air brakes).
Edison Electric became General Electric, and Edison was forced out of that company.

Best post so far, bud.
There is widespread of misinformation about Tesla and it is almost impossible to clear it all up.
I have written a very short Tesla bio at http://home.pacific.net.au/~gnb/ants/teslabio.html that covers some of the information presented in the posts so far.
The 2006 movie "The Prestige" has a very mystical appearance by Tesla at his Colorado Springs lab, played by David Bowie. Check it out. I have visited the lab site. Today it is in the middle of the suburbs of CS, where a house now stands.
Glenn.
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On Sun, 8 Aug 2010 16:59:34 -0700 (PDT), glenbadd

That's funny. The Discovery channel states that his lab grounds are now owned by a company, and they showed video of them exploring the actual lab portion, which was left undisturbed, right next door to the manufacturing company's current operating facilities. It was a pretty cool little piece of video. Then, they stepped outside. The plot that the original tower was on is still there, and is bare now, save for the footer stones.
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FigureItOut wrote:

The Discovery channel was Wardenclyffe, on Long Island. It included the building (laboratory and transmitter equipment) and a massive antenna structure for wireless transmission of power and information. It was funded partly by JP Morgan (mentioned in a previous post). It was never completed. <
http://www.kerrydean.com/pictures/nikola-tesla-wardenclyffe.jpg
The Colorado Springs lab was an enormous Tesla coil for experimenting with wireless transmission of power. There is an often reproduced photo of Tesla sitting in a chair reading, just inside the primary of the Tesla coil, with high voltage streamers everywhere. Unfortunately it is a double exposure. <
http://educate-yourself.org/fe/teslaColoradoSprings1899.gif
<
http://www.pikespeakradiomuseum.com/images/Local%20History/Tesla/Tesla%20Colo%20Spgs%201.jpg
--
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The Discovery Channel piece was AT the COLORADO "transmitter tower" location, goddamned it. They were, in fact, all over the place, but the portion of the show that was about the Colorado location was... ABOUT THE COLORADO LOCATION.
So, any "there's a house there now" claim you have about him is about a DIFFERENT facility, because the one where is lab was is STILL there.
You are not the only one that ever followed a person's life, idiot.
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On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 13:16:34 -0700, FigureItOut

You can just feel the love in this group. Can't you?
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FigureItOut wrote:

I saw the program. The "actual lab portion" in your first post is the Wardenclyffe lab, at the left on the picture of Wardenclyffe I furnished. It is still standing. There is nothing remaining in Colorado Springs - no "actual lab portion".
The octal base is the base of the Wardenclyffe tower, which can be seen at the right in the picture I furnished.
But FigureItOut is a sock puppet of alwayswrong, and reality doesn't matter. Just goes to show - alwayswrong is always wrong.
--
bud--

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They are referring to his lab on Long Is, NY. Its still there in bricks and mortar. There is a 2009 photo on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wardenclyffe_Tower
The earlier CS lab was wooden and was probably knocked down after he left at the end of 1899.
Glenn.
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On Mon, 9 Aug 2010 17:55:12 -0700 (PDT), glenbadd

Sorry, but the tall tower had stone, octal foundation and was in Colorado, and was the one I refer to and the Discovery Channel referred to.
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On Sun, 8 Aug 2010 16:59:34 -0700 (PDT), glenbadd

That movie gets pretty good ratings. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0482571 /
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Technically those handheld units are Oudin coils. They work because gas leaking into a vacuum will ionize and glow when exposed to the RF field produced by such a coil. As the pressure drops, so does the voltage required to ionize the gas, until the pressure is low enough that there is too little gas left to ionize.
It's similar to how a neon or fluorescent tube works. If you filled a tube with neon near atmospheric pressure it would take an extremely high voltage to light it, but pump it down to a vacuum and then let a small amount of neon or argon back in and it will glow brightly at a relatively low voltage.
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