Nikola Tesla

On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 13:37:05 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"


I still cannot believe that you even respond to the inconsiderate, top posting, Usenet abusing bastard.
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The ones you really need. Not the ones the pharma giants con your doctor to give you, but that's another story...LOL
Which one? The diabetes medicine or the high blood pressure medicine
Josepi wrote:

?
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Josepi wrote:

So, you're a 'Laughing Old Loon'? No wonder you think other people need medication.
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Top posted deliberately to annoy TheGlimmerMan
Actually you are talking about consumer products (and the old Westinghouse did make some good ones-maybe before your time) but Westinghouse was quite active and made good stuff for the utility industry- as well as providing students with free copies of the "Westinghouse Transmission and Distribution Book" which was a very useful and practical reference.
One thing that made me scratch my head was their putting HV air breakers into "oil breaker" tanks -more to do with image than need or practicality.
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Don Kelly
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I serviced Westinhouse transformers built in 1955-8 era right up until retirement two years ago. meanwhile many other brands (Pauwell = Federal Pioneer) have been replaced two and three times since 1970s (new). Westinghouse made very reliable, overbuilt transformers that are still in service from the 50s.
You weren't refering to the OJCB (sp?) oil filled Westinhouse outdoor breakers, were you? I rebuilt about 30 of these units in the late 70s.
Top posted deliberately to annoy TheGlimmerMan
Actually you are talking about consumer products (and the old Westinghouse did make some good ones-maybe before your time) but Westinghouse was quite active and made good stuff for the utility industry- as well as providing students with free copies of the "Westinghouse Transmission and Distribution Book" which was a very useful and practical reference.
One thing that made me scratch my head was their putting HV air breakers into "oil breaker" tanks -more to do with image than need or practicality.
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Don Kelly
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No, these were Westinghouse's first attempts at air blast HV breakers in response to the influx of European breakers (Asea, Brown Boveri, etc) which were lighter, cheaper than any of the North American Oil breakers as well as being modular. The last generation of Westinghouse HV oil breakers was good but was no longer competitive. The Westinghouse tank contributed nothing but bulk. GE caught on a bit faster. There were some interesting "fights" in AIEE transactions (later IEEE PAS)
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Don Kelly
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wrote:

You do not annoy me. You just make me wonder sometimes if PROTURDEUS wasn't right about you on at least one of his retarded rants.
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Don Kelly wrote:

I had a new Westinghouse 900 W microwave oven sitting here, still in the sealed carton. I unpacked it and plugged it in. I had only used it a couple times when it tripped a 20 A breaker, and the power cord was too hot to handle. The Westinghouse of years long gone is gone, for good. :(
A microwave that dies before the first splatter is crap, no matter who made it.
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-----------------
my main experience with Westinghouse products was in the 75MW +range. I also had one of the old Westinghouse front load washing machines (50's-60's era) which was very good and ahead of its time.
So- my experience differs from yours- fair enough!
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Don Kelly wrote:

Yours was with their industrial line. It was well built and made to last for decades or longer.
The slogan "You know if it's Westinghouse" was intended for it's consumer products, and Westinghouse hasn't made any in a long time.
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"You can be sure, if it's Westinghouse" was always the joke slogan over the electric chair.
That and "Live better electrically" was another.
Yours was with their industrial line. It was well built and made to last for decades or longer.
The slogan "You know if it's Westinghouse" was intended for it's consumer products, and Westinghouse hasn't made any in a long time.
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Don Kelly wrote:

<snip>
Not to mention about half the nuclear power plants in the country are Westinghouse design, and many of the nuclear submarines from the sixties and seventies were powered by S5W plant (the 'W' stands for Westinghouse).
daestrom
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From my student days, I remember visiting some thermal power plants. IIRC they typically had a mixture of GE and Westinghouse equipment. I think it was as much because of a desire to keep two suppliers in business as for any other reason.
Bill
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An old man would be better off never having been born.

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Salmon Egg wrote:

They, along with RCA were involved in the construction of the 500 kW WLW transmitter in 1933.
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They had some good ideas. They "pioneered" the consumer version of the front loading washing machines, for example. But their consumer stuff (then made in the USA) had quality control problems back in the 60s. I briefly worked for them then and they sold at a discount some of their consumer stuff to the employees. Even with the discount the employees soon learned to buy any other brand.
By the 70s much of the consumer stuff was spun off. I had a front loading washer/dryer combo (stacked) that came with my condo I bought in 1977. It was the "White-Westinghouse" brand. The washer lasted about 17 years with only minor repairs but then was "condemned" by the repairman.

Again, in the 60s they got into trouble in the electrical "switchgear" business. Rather than compete honestly, their executives engaged in price fixing with the competition. C. 1966/67 a handful of Westinghouse executives went to jail for 30 days. It was a relative slap on the wrist but usually such cases were settled by a fine.
They still made money with their nuke plants and tended to provide "turnkey" nuke power plants. But the events at 4 mile island destroyed that business.
I think the Westinghouse name on "consumer" products is the same as the "General Electric" name. It has NOTHING to do with the original company. That the folks who "own" these names don't bother with decent qualify tells you how much they value the name.
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Essential reading on the battle between Edison DC and Westinghouse AC systems, and a new method of execution: "Edison & the Electric Chair" by Mark Essig, Penguin Books, 2003. Review http://www.fredbortz.com/review/EdisonandElectricChair.htm
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wrote:

Understood. You said (it would have helped if you hadn't trimmed so close) that Tesla got hired by Edison, then switched to Westinghouse paid him no royalties. Confusing.
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Westinghouse pioneered Tesla's AC technology while GE was Edison's company pushing DC.
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Fine. Now read the top to paragraphs (together) again.
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Salmon Egg wrote:

From What I have read Edison pretty much stayed in the background, but at least partially paid someone else who used Edison's labs for experiments and advocated for the electric chair.
The first use of an electric chair was horribly botched.
The "war of the currents" was a big deal before AC was picked for the first big generators at Niagra Falls.

There were what I believe were hand held Tesla coils where I was a lab tech. You run the high voltage tip along the glass and to some extent it ionizes the low pressure air remaining inside the system. If you get near a leak, there is a definite streamer of ionized air inside the system that goes to the leak and connects through, via air, to the Tesla coil outside.

The versions I read was that Tesla fixed (and maybe improved?) equipment and Edison reneged on a reasonable preagreed payment.

Westinghouse bought most of Tesla's AC power/motor patents and started building AC systems. There was a significant royalty per HP to Tesla. Later, in Westinghouse economic difficulties, Tesla waived his royalties to help his friend George Westinghouse. Had Tesla's royalties remained in effect he would have been a rich.
George Westinghouse eventually wound up forced out of his company (which was originally based on a major innovation - railroad air brakes).
Edison Electric became General Electric, and Edison was forced out of that company.
In addition to AC systems and the induction motor, Tesla has original patents on radio (at least in the US). Marconi infringed on them. Tesla is even less recognized for radio than AC/motors.
I never heard of Tesla (other than tesla coils) while going through an EE degree. One of the Tesla biographies suggests that the absence of Tesla in texts was the result of Tesla's patents essentially covering all forms of induction motors. It was not in the interest of other companies to give Tesla any credit while those companies were infringing and trying to break the control of the field by Tesla's patents. In particular, one of the early very influential electrical engineering texts was written by Charles Proteus Steinmetz, who was an engineer at General Electric.
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