Simplex latch bolts

Hey, my friends. I've got a spot. I've been asked to install three (count
'em, 3) Simplex 7000 series deadbolts on Pease doors.
Those of you who are familiar with these, they have a crack down the center
of the door edge. Not too bad for installing RFL/ drive latches. But a
complete pain in the drain to try to install mortise latches.
Someone out there might know. Thier latch bolts have got to be identical
with some other brand. I'm wondering about Arrow. There has just got to be
some other brand of latch I can get three of them in 2 3/4 RFL, and it will
save me a pile of labor.
But what brand? Who has faced this?
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
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Use the squeeze play tool w/a board clamped on either side to stop the door from deforming & you're in like Flynn!
Or, use alum door bridges.
Or contact the company that makes spl ones for steel doors & cut out face w/a dremel tool.
Newnsie
Reply to
UPUHRS5437
I like the Dremel tool idea. I've been in the locksmith biz for, lets see (countin backwards on fingers and toes here) 18 years, and I've never had the excuse to buy a Dremel.
The last one I did so many years ago, I marked around the face of the latch with a pencil, and then took out some metal with hammer and cold chisel. Looked pretty awful.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
there are cut off wheels for a dremel tool, thin and THICK (fiberglass reinforced) GET THE THICK, and a FULL face shield.. small rectangular file and a bigger one as well, like a 6 and 10 or 12" --Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
Wow who'd have thought that with such a sophisticated technique a consumate pro like you would wind up with yet another butcher result.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
Use this excuse! :-) Seriously a dremel with cut-off wheels is terrific. But you need to get used to them as they are quite brittle. (I'm referring to the ceramic ones I like - the fiberglass ones aren't so brittle.) You need to have a light touch and *never* twist them in the groove.
With the cutoff wheel you can follow a thin line, and not distort the metal on either side of the line.
Reply to
Henry E Schaffer
Sounds like a whopping heck of a lot better than the hammer and chisel I used last time. I'm sold!
And a big thankyou for the counsell on not twisting blades. I'll be careful.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Dremels are fine but my preference is for a flexshaft like Foredom. It has much more power and a selection of hand pieces for various applications. Also on the thin aluminum oxide or silicon carbide wheels, try stacking two or more on a mandrel. This reinforces them a bit against breakage. And, yes, the face shield or other protection is a must.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey snipped-for-privacy@noyahoo.com -no,no,no
Reply to
Edward Hennessey
go look at the Sears catalog for a 'die grinder'... mine will accept the Dremel tools, but it is made for 1/4" shaft tools as well, and has (at least mine) variable speed and POWER. far better than the Dremel tool size.
--Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
I've got 3 or 4 pneumatic die grinders. Top speed is more like 25-30K. Maybe you meant 20K above? That's about all most of the cutting and grinding media is rated for. The cut off wheels for these are also all of reinforced construction and are really not that easy to break. When they do they usually lose a chip not shatter. Typically they just wear away and become too small in diameter to be effective. The attachments are also a lot larger. 3" being a common size for cutoff wheels since the tools develop considerably more power than most of the small electrics. A comparable electric operated tool will typically run you well in excess or $100.00 not $30.00 bucks or so like most of the dremels and similar.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
I.e., the surface speeds decreases.
Right - and we've been talking about 3 different power ranges - Dremel at the low end, a Foredom in the middle and the die grinder at the high end.
A good quality Dremel (variable speed, 5,000-35,000 rpm) in a box with a small assortment of wheels, mandrels, etc.) costs $64 in the Lowes on-line catalog.
I took a look at that interesting URL - note that most of the bits for this have a diameter of under 0.1". The largest in that catalog is only 0.29" in diameter. So the surface speed is approx the same as for the 3" dia wheel in the die grinder.
The Dremel (which I recommended) has a number of advantages - power not being one of them. :-) This is the standard tradeoff - and what you get should depend on how much you'll use it, what work you have for it, etc. I'm still happy with mine (an *old* single speed unit) but I do have other rotary tools for larger and heavier work.
Reply to
Henry E Schaffer
It looks like the attachments for use with this would be very small diameter and consequently not subject to much stress from centrifical force. As far as catastrophic failure the thing to remember is that all things being equal the material at the edge of a large diameter rotating object is traveling at much higher velocity than the same material of a small diameter object. For example the material at the outer edge of a 3" cutting wheel running at 22K rpm or so (22K is what most of the run of the mill pneumatic die grinders are advertised at at 90psi but most people myself included tend to run them, at least until the pressure drops, at 100-120 psi which is the max for most single stage compressors which tends to result in a higher rpm which is why I posted 25-30K) is traveling at roughly 17,270' per minute or 288' feet per second. The material at the outer edge of a 1/4" diameter object spinning at 300K rpm is traveling at roughly 19,625' per minute or 327 fps. Catastrophic failure of either will produce similar results all other things being equal. To put it in perspective velocity of 1000 fps is approaching the high end for a pump type .177 cal air rifle but still fairly common for such a weapon. 327 fps is very low velocity for any modern airgun design (think cheap CO2 pellet pistol). An object of relatively small mass traveling at 327 fps is probably not going to do much serious tissue damage but you had damn well better wear eye protection.
I'm guessing that the high speed of the tool you linked to, which I admit I was unaware of, produces a very fine finish on the workpiece.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
P:
It can. And you will make more headway than a fellow with the same bit at 10K rpm. Using just the dedicated bits for the tool, you ought to be fairly safe since any experienced person knows a light touch is critical unless one wants the diamonds to prematurely spall. I guess it was the inevitability of a some stupid human trick brought to mind the image of the unfortunately picturesque calamith that would ensue if someone chucked a composite grinding disc into the unit and leaned on it.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
snipped-for-privacy@noyahoo.com -no,no,no
Reply to
Edward Hennessey
Absolutely. This is one reason I like the very thin ceramic cutoff wheels for the Dremel. They are thin and so remove less metal and so work faster (measured in linear progress) that a thicker wheel would with this amount of power.
Amen! I much too often see craftspeople ignoring eye (and ear) protection.
Certainly - choose the tool to match the job. However it can pay to be patient useing a Dremel for a job which comes up once in 10 years, rather than paying more for a larger, heavier, bulkier tool. Once in a while I get almost to the point of buying a Foredom - but I've always managed to get through the job without taking the plunge!
Reply to
Henry E Schaffer

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