What do you call this?

My front door has a bolt on top and bottom that penetrates the door frame
above and the floor. See this picture:
formatting link

I need to replace the one at the bottom since it's not working (missing
pieces)...but what do you call this? Is this something that is standard I
can order parts or do I need to take it all apart to take to a locksmith for
a special order?
Thanks,
MC
Reply to
MiamiCuse
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This is called a flush bolt, and they are often stocked at your local locksmith.
If he doesn't have it he should be able to get it quickly.
Did he swap out the trim rings for you?
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
Flush bolt - got it!
No, I went to two locksmiths and they don't have the right "thickness". I have a thick one and a thin one and I need one somewhere in between. I am going to leave the turn thumb sticking out a bit for now until I find something. I did some search online and nothing.
Thanks,
MC
Reply to
MiamiCuse
?Is this something that is standard I
MC
A good door dealer will have what you need. Where I live I can think of several places to go. Like a builder or commercial hardware place. Let your fingers do the walking.
Bob AZ
Reply to
Bob AZ
It's a flush bolt and it's usually used in commercial applications. Go to a locksmith that advertises commercial work. You may still need to describe it before they know what you mean.
Reply to
Steve
I took the bottom part out and it seems to be rather tricky so I will have to take it to a locksmith to get a match most likely a special order. Thanks.
MC
Reply to
MiamiCuse
What is so tricky ??? It is a piece that gets screwed to the edge of the door into an area that has been chiseled out to receive it (the part where you flip the latch with your thumb) connected by a threaded rod to a little bolt piece that protects past the top/bottom of the door aligned by a little plate with a hole (which often has a plate with an elongated ellipitical hole to receive the bolt) that matches the shape of the bolt piece held on with three screws... The "trickiest" part of installing one of these is to make sure the little guide plate is in the correct location on the top/bottom edge of the door to properly align the projecting bolts with the holes in the top frame/header of the door, and the floor/bottom sill of the door so that they will actually work...
I forget the size of the threaded rod (I'm sorry its been over seven years since I have worked on doors that use such things) so I can not specify exactly what you need to fix it if the rod is missing... The bolt pieces and guide plates come with a new unit in the box... (A commercial locksmith may have some extras laying around from situations where the flush bolt latch assembly on the edge of the door was broken beyond repair so you might be able to find some if you ask around the right lock shops)...
However, if your wooden door has the guide plates missing and the screws included with the replacement flush bolt won't hold you will either have to find screws that can do this or repair the edge of the door in some way so that screws will hold...
Often in commercial metal doors these screws will get broken off when the door gets hit by something large enough to do damage and it is real fun to have to take down the entire door and lay it on its side to repair those three little screws...
I hope this information describes exactly what you were looking for, and I feel much more justified in what I posted in your other topic since Christopher A. Young also sees through your little charade as well...
Evan, ~~ formerly a maintenance man and now also a former college student...
Reply to
Evan
Take the flush bolts you have off the door and bring them to the lock shop.
If the bolt at the locksmith is the same brand, It is quite possible that the broken part can be supplied from the new one if you do not wish to wait for a new one.
The bolt itself is threaded on to the end of a rod, connecting it to the actuator.
The usual cause of failure is to not get the lever flipped all the way and to slam the door and bend or break the thing.
Not all builders hardware companies have web sites, but the lock shop has probably dealt with this problem before.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
I wholeheartedly agree with your assessment of MiamiCuse...
I fear he thinks he can analyze his way into fixing his problems without any intuition at all into how to deal with small adjustment or alignment issues...
He doesn't get that at some point simple possession of knowledge diverges from practical experience and that simply looking up instructions on how to do something without having any basic context as to what they mean or how to use them in relation to other factors of the project at hand is pretty much worthless unless you are one of those few people that knows everything... (In which case it could be asked why you had to look anything up)
Not only that -- he likes to hound his contractors and whatnot with incessant questions as they go about doing whatever work he has so diligently figured out he cannot do himself and therefore hired them for so next time he may not have to hire them... I wonder how many times he hires the same contractors (which would solve the timing issues he brought up as a contractor returning to work with a pleasant customer will often go out of their way to tell the person when they will arrive since they understand who they are dealing with the second time around with a repeat customer, or if the customer was less-than-pleasant the contractor may politely say he or she is already busy that day with other clients as a way to gently encourage the person to find someone else to do their project or service call)...
Such questions are cute when a little kid starts asking what you are doing but entirely pathetic when an adult does the same thing... There is a difference between that curiosity of a child wanting to learn something and an adult wanting to be taught how to do something so they don't have to pay to have someone else do it for them again... Ask most professional tradespeople if they will teach a customer how to repair something so they don't have to come back and get paid to fix/repair it again -- you might get taught how to do it, but I bet the price of the repair will usually increase, as the technician knows you don't want him to come back out to fix the problem again because you are too cheap to pay someone to do it and want to be able to do it yourself...
Evan, ~~ formerly a maintenance man and now also a former college student...
Reply to
Evan
Whereas by contrast you don't study a damn thing and simply proceed under the policy of: If it isn't broken when I get there it will be when I leave, and I hope they never find out.
Reply to
Steve
Other than (and some irony here) over-anylizing the situation at hand I don't see where either of you get this from. He asked clear concise questions and...holy crap....actually provided good pictures.
Reply to
Steve
LOL... Ok... When you add up all of the recent questions that MiamiCuse has asked on the various topics he has posted questions on throughout many UseNet groups it is not "over-analyzing" to call him out on his hidden agenda of wanting FREE advice so he doesn't have to pay someone who possesses such knowledge to complete his projects for him...
But I guess you either don't remember postings from two or three weeks ago or don't care to do a simple search to see if the question has been asked in the past...
I'm the type of person that doesn't mind teaching someone something if that is what they are asking me to do and we have reached some form of accommodation that we both agree to in return for that teaching...
But for someone to go through a project in such a way that they are asking for what boils down to step-by-step instructions on how to do something they should pay to learn how to do...
That I have no tolerance for...
Especially when the person asking the questions is claiming to be asking them ONLY so he can use the information to determine whether or not to hire someone else to do the work...
Evan, ~~ formerly a maintenance man and now also a former college student...
Reply to
Evan
Umm that's why Usenet exists.
Umm again, because maybe you are a bit slow: That's why Usenet exists: To exchange FREE information. Shocking isn't it?
Then my advice is to get off Usenet because that, by and large, is what it's for.
Assuming he even made that claim, so what? Try to get it through your head: Usenet exists to ask questions and get FREE answers. A shocking, and perhaps frightening concept to you I'm sure, but none the less Usenets inherent purpose. Last but not least, less you think I fell for your subject changing two step, what does anything you wrote here have to do with the claim I responded to, specifically that MC is over analyzing, which, apparently, you and Stormy feel engineers do? Any answer on that or you just totally gave up on that argument without even trying? That would be your best course because it's pretty obvious you had no clue what you were talking about and still don't.
Reply to
Steve
Evan,
Ease up a bit, MC seems to be trying to solve real problems and is not out of line trying to analyze his problems. After all analysis is the first step to understanding, and even if you guess wrong, you are likely to realize the mistake and never make it a second time.
Did you graduate, or are you taking a break?
Reply to
Roger Shoaf

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