What kind of lock are these?

I bought a house which has an office which can be accessed from the exterior
courtyard and the office door is a commercial "store front" style door.
The door key is lost so I need to replace the lockset. But I am not
familiar with this kind of lock (these are not locks you find at Home
Depot). Here is a pic of the front of the door:
formatting link

and here is the back side:
formatting link

How can I replace this lock? What is it called?
Is there a way I can "key" this lock so that it uses the same key as my
other doors (standard residental door locks)?
Thanks,
MC
Reply to
MiamiCuse
Loading thread data ...
you need a mortise cylinder, keyed to match your house door.. go find a lock shop and tell him your needs..
HOW is the door shown locked? takes a key to do that..
--Shiva--
Reply to
me
Adams Rite deadlatch with either Schlage or Ilco standard mortise cylinders.
Take off the face plate, find the 2 tiny screws even with the cylinders and loosen them to unscrew the cylinders. Personally I'd install a thumbturn mortise cylinder inside for emergency egress, and a better grade mortise cylinder on the outside.
BTW you probably need shorter 1 inch depth mortise cylinders, easily measured once removed.
This is not a very expensive locksmith service call, and they should have a much better high security cylinder for ya. If you are keeping anything of value in your office, and this door is an example, you should consider upgrading your main entry cylinder(s) too.
Reply to
BogusID
I will add my suspicion that the door was locked in the open position as the pull handles have been removed from the door, and this allows one to open the door as it has something to grab.
When calling the locksmith, let him know you have an Adams Rite lock on your narrow style aluminum door and that your door pulls are missing. Often a locksmith may have some pulls from jobs that different types of hardware have been removed so that when he comes out to rekey your lock, he can bring some pulls if he has any.
I suspect that the door was probably obtained as salvage. This is not a bad thing, but might explain why the pulls and the keys were not supplied.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
Thanks. I think I would replace it since the cylinder is very old. However I am having trouble removing the lock. I have unscrewed everything and the lock would come out. I cannot figure out how the cylinder is attached if I can loosen that I think the mortise part will slide out. I do not see any screws to loosen the cylinder. For most locks there is a screw from the middle that holds the cylinder and once you unscrew it the cylinder slides out but this one does not have a middle screw. I am baffled.
MC
Reply to
MiamiCuse
has to be there..
SOME TIMES, it takes a pair of pliers to turn the cylinder, the threads get dirty and stuck --Shiva--
Reply to
me
also like to add, SOME TIMES one needs to slightly loosen the two screws that hold the latch body in the door cavity. I use to tighten on them just for extra security against the cylinder working loose.
my2¢
Reply to
Key
?????? I thought the trick was to insert a blank or a wrong key and use the pliers on that - unless the cylinder is going to be trashed.
Reply to
peterwn
that will work to a POINT.. HOWEVER, the 2 screws that mount the AR latch into the cavity CAN hold the cylinder VERY tightly.. and as Key said, need to be loosened a bit..nobody gets the dimensions precise.. unfortunately
By the looks of your picture the entire door is 'dirty' like its been stored.. therefore, I would pull the edge cover and spray at the top of the lock cylinder on the inside, some penetrating type oil.. PB BLaster or even WD40, and if ALL the screws are loose, 4 in this case, GENTLY take pliers and GENTLY try to turn one cylinder to loosen... We have a tool that will grab the cylinder smoothly that wont leave teeth marks on the OS of the cylinder made for this and I have had to use it MANY times..
IF, you are near the ocean, AND this cylinder is not a brass body, the 'pot metal' that they use, can corrode a bit and lock this up pretty good at times.. making it VERY hard to just 'finger unscrew' the cylinder
--Shiva--
Reply to
me
<snip>
Yes, this makes sense - sacrificing a cylinder to save time may well be the best option, especially if it was a cheap pot metal one to start with.
Reply to
peterwn
The cylinder will not slide out-it has to be turned out. The set screws are small-there is one for the outside cylinder and one for the inside. They are recessed and you will need either a small straight screwdriver or a hex wrench-and you may have to loosen them up quite a bit. Spraying some lube on looks like a good idea as crusty as the cylinder looks. You can try to put a blank key in and try to budge it-but I use the removal tool-or if cylinders gonna be trashed-big-ass pair of channel locks. Turn CCW.
Reply to
goma865
thank you thank you thank you I finally found the two set screws. I don't know how I miss them. I guess I was assuming the cylinder is one contigious piece with a screw in the middle, and now I realize it's actually two separate cylinders one inside one outside. Here is a pic after I took them apart:
formatting link
formatting link
The cylinder says "DORIO".
I assume I can get both cylinders from a locksmith shop. Question: Is there a way to not require a key on the inside? Can the inside be a latch (like a dead bolt) instead of a key?
Thanks for all your help guys!
MC
Reply to
MiamiCuse

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.