Annealing Oven for Acrylic / PMMA / Perspex / Plexiglas - Searching for Parts

I'm looking to build an annealing oven for Acrylic / Perspex / Plexiglas / PMMA. Nothing fancy just functional, I'm intending to use
MDF to create a box structure to which I will add a hinged door and some heating elements. The annealing process is only to about 80C/175F so I'm happy that the wood will do the job.
I initially considered buying an old oven and ripping out the elements/thermostat, however for safety reasons I'm not too keen to do this (The parts are sure to be over powerful), hence I'm trying to find a supplier for the heating elements/thermostat and controller. I would happily receive any information anyone could give... even where to search.
I am based in Europe; a supplier in the UK or France would be most suitable.
Many Thanks Grant
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G'day Mate, Depending on the total size of your oven, a hairdryer may be enough to provide the heat required. If it's slightly larger, a fan heater can be adapted to suit. The fan heater may already have the required thermostat in the air inlet (or between the fan and the element) and on many models can be readily adjusted to suit the temperature range you desire by turning the fitted temperature knob.
You would may want a metal duct to feed the warmed air to the oven, and recirculate the same air to the fan's inlet. A couple of baffles once the air enters your oven box could be easily designed in, or if the box is made a little larger, the fan heater may be simply placed on a shelf inside.
If you want to scale up the unit, it can be easily achieved by simply adding a couple more fan heaters. Even if their thermostats are not at exactly the same air temperature, they will still settle to a stable oven temperature after a suitable warmup time. If you drill a couple of holes in the top or the side, you can insert a thermometer into a range of different points to check the temperature at a number of locations. It may take a half an hour of playing with the knobs, but you will be able to achieve a very even temperature. The fan forced oven will also have a more even temperature gradient from one end of the box to the other compared to an old oven element.
I think I would add a smoke detector and not use it unattended! Firbeboard sheet is also cheaply available from your local hardware, and if you used a product like you would line the wall behind a fireplace with, it would allow for higher operating temperatures if later required for another project.
You can pick up the heaters brand new for less than a carton of beer in most larger villages!
:<)
Hope this helps, Peter

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[Hobby group trimmed out]
This is about as good advice as you will need to do the job...
Brian W
On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 18:59:41 +1000, "Bushy Pete"

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