Carpet Redyeing

An advertisement shouting the praises of doing something with appearance damaged carpet has appeared in the local rag 'The Mail'
last Wednesday.
If you got to the website
http://www.4carpetcolour.com
they basically slag off everyone else as 'fly by nighter overextended cleaners' and claim their system with:
'the same dyes as as used in mills; a safe non toxic mix that is guaranteed for the normal life of the carpet.'
is the only way to go. However, I am suspicious of any company that claims to be the only outfit that can do a particular job. How much truth is there in thier claims? Has anyone had their carpet dyed that would like to share their experiences?
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No experience but I think it is possible. Nylon and wool are easy to dye but I doubt they can strip old dye first which means they are adding additional dye. There sample photos show going from a light, almost virgin fiber, to dark.
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I'm an engineer for a carpet manufacturer, and so I have a dog in this fight. Why don't you just go ahead and buy some new carpet? ;-)
FYI, when carpet is dyed at the mill the dye is "set" using a steamer to hold the material at 212 or thereabouts for 5 minutes or so. Then the carpet is dried using natural gas ovens, which also helps to keep the carpet and dye at a high temperature, further setting the dye. You're not gonna duplicate that process on the living room floor.
Overdyeing is a short term solution, and isn't going to give the same performance. Even if the dye holds up (not likely) most mill-dyed carpets have stain and dirt protecting chemicals applied (e.g. stainmaster, which is a topical anti-stain solution added during dyeing, and Scotchguard, which is an anti-soiling topical solution added later in the process). Both are applied after dyeing. I don't think the spray and pray guy is going to do that...

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Kyle Boatright wrote:

I thought 3M withdrew Scotchgard from the market, due to fears about perfuorooctanoic acid (PFOA).
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Mark Thorson wrote:

They are still selling. To consumers.
See website below....
I had heard a rumor of discontinuation of Scotchguard..... but it was certain spray products were being discontinued and newer ones replacing them.
http://www.3m.com/us/home_leisure/scotchgard /
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