AA battery hack secret

Dave Hinz writes:


Some 9-volt batteries consist of 6 AAAA (yes, quadruple A, http://www.google.com/search?q ªAA+alkaline) cells inside.
I know this because when laser pointers were new and cool in the early 1990s I had a very thin pen-styled one that took AAAA's, which were very hard to find, and had to resort to dismantling 9-volt batteries to get them. They used spot-welded tabs to connect, but so small that you could pull them off.
Sometimes I would open a 9-volt battery and find that it was a stack of 6 little sardine-can-shaped cells instead of AAAA cylinders. I forget nbow which brands were one type versus the other.
I still have that laser pointer. Even though they're cheap nowadays I've never seen one that thin.
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    Perhaps not now -- but I have a Geiger counter (Navy surplus) which requires:
1    15V cell (for bias)
1     135 V cell (I made an adaptor for two 67-1/2 V cells, which     are now quite expensive and difficult to find on their own).
2)    F cells in series for the filaments for the tubes.
    I suspect that portable radios in the past (tube days) used F cells more commonly than today, which is why the 6V lantern battery was designed to be just the right size to hold four F cells.
    Anyway -- I've used 6V lantern batteries as sources for the size 'F' cells for this in the past, and I hope that most vendors still make the lantern battery from 'F' cells.

    I wish that I could *see* the video. Even with flash installed and turned on, I can't see it on a browser running in my unix system, which makes me think that it is yet another web site tailored to depend on the unique bugs found in Internet Explorer, and it just won't run on anything other than a Windows system. (Just like the system run for patients to check up on their status with my doctor's group -- it won't work fully on anything other than a Windows system.
    Can anyone tell me what brand of battery is being disassembled in the video?
    Thanks,         DoN.
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On 24 Sep 2007 01:10:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

The "F" designation was for "F"ilament use. Lots of old batteries had 1.5 volt filaments in the rectifier tubes, so you had an "A", a "B" and an "F" battery.

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clare, at, snyder.on.ca wrote:

Wrong. The 'A' battery supplied the filaments. the 'B' battery supplied the plate, or B+, and the 'C" battery supplied the grid bias. Some radios used a separate 'C' battery, and there a re reports of fifty year old 'C' batteries still supplying the full terminal voltage. They had no load when the radio was turned off, even though they weren't switched.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

YEP. The "C" negative term went to the grid resistor and thence to the grid with the input coupled via. a capacitor. Hence no circuit path. No current drain. ...lew...
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clare at snyder.on.ca wrote:

And "C" for bias voltage. I can remember a few that had them. ...lew...
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On Sep 24, 5:02 am, clare at snyder.on.ca wrote:

Now you are pulling our legs. You have a " B " battery for plate voltage and just why do you have a rectifier tube?
The confusion is that there were A , B and C batteries for filaments, plate voltage , and grid bias. But then there is also AAA, AA, C, D, and F cells where the letter designates the size. I can't readily find any source for the size designations, but it must be in some NEMA standard.
Dan
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On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 17:43:24 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

Well, I've worked on an old battery set that, like a car radio of the time, had a multivibrator to make the high plate voltages from a lower battery voltage. IIRC the main battery was 12 volts. Most of the "valves" or vacuum tubes ran on either 12 volts or six (2 in series) but the rectifier has a 1 or 2 volt filament. It used an "ignition" battery - one of those that used to run doorbells, fencers, and battery ignitions on some stationary engines years ago. It was called the "F"ilament battery. I think it was some sort of "farm" radio.
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clare, at, snyder.on.ca wrote:

I worked on hundreds of old radios in the '60s and '70s, and still have a lot of service data. The people on news:rec.antiques.radio+phono have a lot more.
All I have ever seen used in a car radio was the 0Z4 gas rectifier, or a regular 6 or 12 volt filament regulator like the 6AX4 and 12AX4. A very few used a synchronous vibrator, and eliminated the need for a rectifier. (Till the contacts welded).

Farm radios were 32 volts, to run of the winchargers used to charge the batteries for lights in a farmhouse.
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On Tue, 25 Sep 2007 00:34:04 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

I thought they were 48 volts? Hence our telephone systems still run 48 volts talk battery.
Gunner
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wrote:

Nope...32 volts. I have my grandmother's 32 volt Delco radio. Still works! They had a wind carger, and shelves of glass-jar batteries in the basement...before REA came through.
Ken
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Gunner Asch wrote:

Can't say about ALL, but the one I remember was 32V. Boy what an impressive bank of glass batteries with charge indicator balls in each one. ...lew...
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Right on. My great uncles lived on a farm with such and I spent lots of time with them while a kid. in the early 40s. In fact was there on the infamous Dec day. ...lew...
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clare at snyder.on.ca wrote:

They wer not "multivibrators" just vibrator. there were the single and "synchronus" varities, (which eliminated the need for a rectifier). Then there were the rectifiers that didnt need fil. voltage ( OZ4 or some such it's been a way to long to remember). I had been playing around with such in the early 40s. Anything else you would like to know about vibrator power supplies? ...lew...
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    [ ... ]

    Well ... something else to *add*. The typical automotive vibrator ran somewhere near 60 Hz (since there were lots of 60Hz transformers around), but I had (and may still have somewhere) a special vibrator and matching transformer which had the reed weighted to lower the frequency to 20 Hz, and it was used to generate the ring signal for small telephone exchanges -- from before the Sub-Cycle passive devices to do the same thing by dividing the 60 Hz power line frequency by three. (I never have been able to find out exactly how they did that, but I have two sealed units of that type -- different load capacities.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 26 Sep 2007 21:14:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

I remember the vibrators being something like 255 hz. High frequency is easier to filter, and works just fine on lower frequency transformers.
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According to <clarence at snyder dot on dot ca>:

    [ ... ]

    O.K. I can accept that. I never bothered to check the frequency (I didn't have a way to do so back when I had normal vibrators. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

No scope? :)
Someone scanned the Mallory vibrator data sheets and posted it on alt.binaries.pictures.radio a while back. I saved the images to my hard drive, but it must have been before the first of the year, and on my old WIN ME computer that isn't available at the moment. There were several frequencies, from 60 HZ, up The 60 HZ were common in ham radio and CB gear, so you could use the same power transformer for AC or DC operation. I think that a lot of car radio vibrators were 115 HZ, which would cause about a little 230 HZ ripple. I'll see if I can find those images. There are a lot of collectors on news:rec.antiques.radio+phono if anyone has any serious questions, or needs help finding parts and information on old radios.
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    Not when I was playing with vibrators. Once I had a scope, I had no vibrators left (except the 20 Hz one), nor any real interest.

    O.K. So I could have encountered 60 Hz ones. The ones which I got all came from a surplus place in Cambridge Mass -- Eli's.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Wed, 26 Sep 2007 21:17:01 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

You are correct - it WAS 115hz, with a 230 hz ripple to filter out, now that you mention it.
I used to put one on an ignition coil and hook the secondary to a foil tape over a mylar tape on the bottom of the leading edge of the hood of my old Valiants and Darts to keep curious fingers at bay. When the hood came up 1/2" the leading edge was live. I forgot to turn it off before checking the oil at least twice ---- Sure charged up the old bateries!!!!!!!
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