Axminster instructions

I have an Axminster drill grinding attachment that was in a box of stuff
from my father's tools .Unfortunately , I don't have the instructions ...
I can probably puzzle out how to use it , but would prefer to find a copy
of the instructions - so far the only thing I know for sure is that it is
supposed to work on the side of the grinding wheel . If anyone has a set of
the instructions , I would really appreciate a copy . I did already google
for the info , and came up dry .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
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Upon further searching without limiting the search to Axminster , this unit could be any one of a handful of brands (Axminster was the first hit on a google images search ... but they all look almost exactly alike) . The instructions for a General #825 are very concise , and will be what I'll use to set it up . At last , a sharp drill bit with flutes the same length !
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Good Afternoon :)
Try the following Axminster download URL
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Hope this helps you find what your are looking for :)
Regards, Bob rgentry at oz dot net
Reply to
Bob Gentry
Thanks for the link , Bob . I was unable to find a manual there , but not to worry , several others make units that are virtually identical , and I have downloaded and printed one fro General - their #825 is a dead ringer . And for all I know , this is one is another brand - Axminster was just the first hit on a Google Images search .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Note that this grinder requires rather precise adjustment of the distance from the wheel to achieve proper clearance angles along with feeding. There are some examples on the web showing the grinder on an adjustable slide mount. You probably will not get a good drill the first time but it is possible once you get it sorted out.
Don Young
Reply to
Don Young
Thanks Don , I kinda got that impression from the instructions . I'm probably going to build a dedicated grinder set-up for it , and since it seems to be missing part of the base , I'll probably get to do a bit of aluminum casting . More fun !! I have a "spare" 3450 RPM motor that will make an excellent grinder with a cup wheel , which would seem to be the best choice for this project . Gotta beat my hand-sharpening technique ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
I have a General 825. Where did you find a copy of the manual? Lots of ebay "for-sale" ads, but little else on Goo.
Joe
Reply to
Joe
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Click on the Instructions/FAQ tab and there's a "Download" button at the bottom of the instructions.
Best Regards, Keith Marshall snipped-for-privacy@progressivelogic.com
"I'm not grown up enough to be so old!"
Reply to
Keith Marshall
One home-brew example here:
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I wouldn't bother trying to replicate your missing base. All you should need is a vertical hole the proper size in the new adjustable block. Note how the old base really serves little purpose anymore...
Reply to
Leon Fisk
But the "hole" is actually a vee with a sprung pressure plate and is NOT vertical.
That is assuming that we are discussing the same hole
Richard
Reply to
Richard Edwards
Like Richard said, the hole where the post/stem is secured in place is not vertical.
This angle is important to the design, not that it needs to be exactly perfectly duplicated, but the post/stem angle is necessary for obtaining a proper point angle while resharpening.
I don't know where my General drill grinding fixture is (also made with the Sears Craftsman label on them), but maybe someone can measure that angle for Snag.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I've been thinking of building a setup to rough sharpen drills using a 4.5 inch angle grinder. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
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Yup , Kieth nailed it .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
I think we're talking apples and oranges here . There is a "base" part , which holds the rotating assembly and has a slot to bolt it to a horizontal surface . What I was referring to is a "sub-base" that will have a square protrusion on top that will fit the slot in the "base" part and let me slide it towards/away from the grinding wheel . The part I was referring to may not actually be on the original attachment - but seems like a good idea to keep the whole thing from rotating .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 21:25:43 -0400, the infamous Gerald Miller scrawled the following:
Heck, Gerry. Just lay the thing sideways on the bench with the trigger locked on and have at it. It works as well as a grinder or belt sander. (I use my 1" belt sandah most often, though.) In the field, I have used a DA sander. _That's_ the tricky monster. ;)
Terry just doesn't get enough practice, ah betcha.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I have a Drill Doctor for sharpening but when I have collected enough abused bits, I prefer to grind the evidence away by hand and save wear and tear on the diamond wheel. I do have a home built pedestal grinder that has served me well for 45 years - double shafted 1/4 HP motor shrouded with sheet steel and with cobbled together tool rests. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
And you'd be right . I seldom have to sharpen , and when I do I have problems keeping the flutes even and the angles correct . But my bits are all getting dull , and I'd like to at least try to do it right - and can't afford the Drill Doctor 750 I'd really like to have . A short period of unemployment followed by a 20% reduction in pay has really raised hell with my plans for tooling and shop expansion to hold them . I've had this thing for years , it was in a box of stuff from Dad's tools when he passed . Figgered I'd dig it out and try to set it up .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Well, there is a cheap adapter to use an angle grinder as a cutoff saw, I suppose you could use it to thin the point if you wear the face shield and body armor from your riot gear.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 05:21:11 -0500, the infamous "Terry Coombs" scrawled the following:
A quick tip for hand-grinding is to use a magnifying headset to bring the work a bit closer to our old eyes. I happily keep one of these in the bathroom for splinters and one in the shop for close work.
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$8 investment (when bought on sale.)
Reply to
Larry Jaques
The two I have, cost me ~$30 each some 30+ years ago. My shop safety glasses are the same as I wear for the computer - upside down bi-focals with a small mid distance (24") lens top centre in reading glasses (12"). With the "opti-visor" in place, I end up working at about 3". Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller

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