Degree symbol °

Ever want to use the degree symbol instead of typing the word "degree"?
If yes:
With "Numlock" ON. hold down the alt key and type 0176 (USING THE KEYPAD).
°
°
°
°
Ha!
Pete Stanaitis
--------------------------
Reply to
spaco
Loading thread data ...
Take a gander at this for a lot more. A little tricky to start but comprehensive at the finish.
formatting link
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Reply to
Edward Hennessey
It can also be done without the numlok. °
j/b
Reply to
jusme
Thanks for that 2¢ worth of information, Pete.
I've used those alt nnnn for some time now. Very useful!
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
spaco wrote in news:2pqdnYysZty9y_DanZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@bright.net:
Also....
Ø = Alt 0216 ² = Alt 0178 × = Alt 0215 ± = Alt 0177
Reply to
Anthony
On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 11:27:54 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, "Edward Hennessey" quickly quoth:
Why not just use the built-in Windows Character Map? Start/All Programs/Accessories/System Tools/Character Map But first figure out what font you use in Usenet. I use Courier because of its easy reading and monospace (fixed-width) style. (When someone posts an ascii graphic, I can see it right away.)
-- Once we believe in ourselves, we can risk curiosity, wonder, spontaneous delight, or any experience that reveals the human spirit. --e e cummings
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Also ALT 248 ° JR Dweller in the cellar
spaco wrote:
Reply to
JR North
Of course -- there are other problems which can result from this. That is part of an extension to the ACSII character set (the standardized part is all with the parity bit clear, and the character which you generated has the parity bit set. (Octal code 260 for that,)
With a plain ASCII terminal set to ignore parity (as is common) that would display as '0' (the numeral zero).
With various other systems (including Windows boxes with different charactersets selected, including different national charactersets), it is possible that you will get other characters displayed.
And to *generate* the character on different keyboards, and different systems, you use different methods. For example, on a Sun keyboard, you hit the "compose" key, followed by an underscore '_', followed by either an upper case 'O' or a lower-case 'o'. (Yes, they both generate the same character.
Interestingly enough, the character 'º' in *my* system is a different code -- octal 272, decimal 186, or hex BA. *That* shows as the degrees symbol in my eiditor, while what you entered displays in the editor as \260, the code for part of the non-printable range. It *does* show as you intended in the email client and pager, but not in the editor which I use.
It is for reasons like this that I normally avoid posting to usenet using *any* character beyond what is found on the keycaps. That way, I know that everyone will see it the same.
When I post -- I want *everyone* who is interested to be able to read what I've posted -- not to show off tricks at the keyboard for generating characters outside the range of standard 7-bit ASCII.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Gee, guys, I didn't mean to stir up a hornets nest on this! I just thought this was way for me to dress up my own Turbocad drawings, Excel spreadsheets and Word documents. I meant the information for those who aren't already as advanced as you guys are.
Pete Stanaitis --------------
spaco wrote:
Reply to
spaco
"spaco" wrote: Gee, guys, I didn't mean to stir up a hornets nest on this! (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Don's post was not a slam at you--it was a very helpful admonition to people like me, who learn a little, and find themselves worse off.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Be aware too that the IBM extended ascii character set may not display as intended on computers of recipients living in countries outside the USA (for the reasons Don mentioned). My experiences with this date to the 1980's but it caused me to just get out of the habit of using the extended ascii set. Here's more than you ever wanted to know:
formatting link
David Merrill
Reply to
David Merrill

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.