Found an American made item

Just got my new cell phone holster. Made in USA. Pennslyyvania even. Very nice spring steel clip, you can flex the heck out of this thing
and it snaps right back.
www.ripoffs.com
One to fit my phone is rather old, I found it on ebay for 8 bucks. Kind of wish it had a magnetic closure instead of velcro, but this velcro seems nice, we'll see how long it lasts.
Randy, from Allentown PA.
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
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Just bought (yesterday) two new pairs of New Balance sneakers. Made in USA
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I've noticed it's not too hard to get made in USA footwear. I've not had luck finding jeans from here though. Over the past 13 or so years carharrt jeans went from made in USA to assembled in mexico with "components" from the the US to just made in mexico.
There's no question the older jeans held up better, but the current ones are still acceptable. The stitches are still OK, just the fabric isn't the way is used to be. I dug some out of the rags pile to actually compare.
most of my shoes are new balance (not the chinese ones) boots are Carolina or Matterhorn Cocoran has some nice shoes too.
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Cydrome Leader wrote:

I bought a couple of "Made in USA" plastic buckets from WalMart a couple of weeks ago. Neither one lasted a week. Both split their bottoms.
--

Richard Lamb
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb
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wrote:

Hmmm. An injected-molded plastic holster for a sophisticated piece of electronic hardware made somewhere else, and plastic buckets that split...
Are we trying to recapture the bottom end of manufacturing? What's next, clothes pins?
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Ed Huntress wrote:

Have you noticed what a large portion of our manufacturing economy is represented by AR15 variants and accessories? A lot of small US companies producing stuff in the US.
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wrote:

Actually, I haven't noticed that, no. I don't usually read those articles in _American Rifleman_. Let's see, the AR-15, which was the original designation for the proto-M-16, was developed in...was it 1958? Armalite sold it in 1959, so it must have been around for at least a little while before that.
Yup, we're right on top of things. <g>

Yes, I've read the M2 reports for around 35 years. It's true that there's a lot more manufacturing going on in the US than many people realize. Aside from cars, though, we lost the volume of business in most consumer products.
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I doubt that small arms manuufacturing and sales amounts to even a small fraction of a percentage of the US GDP
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PrecisionmachinisT wrote:

I think most people today care more about employment than GDP.
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It's all crap anyway. The garment industry in Taiwan leaves one stitch not completed in the clothing item and sends it over so it can say "Made in USA". The little old woman that puts the last "American" stitch in has a Pakistani citizenship, anyway.
-------
"Pete C." wrote in message
I think most people today care more about employment than GDP.
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Okay, then I'll word it differently.....
I doubt that small arms manuufacturing and sales amounts to even a small fraction of a percentage of the total US employment.
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That's because many or maybe most of the military small arms weapons used in the USA are manufactured in Kitchener, Ontario,Canada by West Heights Manufacturing and divisions of the same company, under different names.
-------------------
"PrecisionmachinisT" wrote in message
Okay, then I'll word it differently.....
I doubt that small arms manuufacturing and sales amounts to even a small fraction of a percentage of the total US employment.
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On 6/24/2011 3:53 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Except for some minor parts, springs and pins and stuff, the current M4 has changed quite a bit from the first AR-15. That doesn't necessarily mean improved...

Which reminds me of something that I've been pondering.
What is this all powerful gun lobby that gun controllers seem to fear so much? Where's the power?
What tiny percentage of the nations output does the firearms industry represent? I'm not talking about F-22s and aircraft carriers, but Kel-Tec, Ruger, S&W and other companies catering to the citizen shooter. I've seen a couple of these companies and they don't seem to take much space or employ a lot of people. Most of them together would probably fit in the local (Wauwatosa) unused Briggs & Stratton building. I don't know what square footage it had, but when I worked there, shop floor management moved around in bikes and golf carts if they had to go any distance.
So how do these compare to Big Oil and Big Pharm and other big US industries?
David
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NRA/ILA's political power has three prongs: Money from manufacturers, money from members, and direct influence over members' voting. Taken together, they are very powerful.

I'm leaving for a few days or I'd look it up for you. If you want to see for yourself, you'll find all of the manufacturing data you could want on the Commerce Dept.'s website. It's not easy to dig through it; sometimes it's on the BEA subsidiary site.
If you want me to dig up the numbers, ask again around the middle of next week and I'll get it.
--
Ed Huntress

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On 6/25/2011 8:13 AM, Ed Huntress wrote:

It seems you're back and I'm still curious! :^)
David
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I was hoping you were away on vacation. d8-)
Ok, let me get you some good data sources here, without burying you in detail...
The drill-down tables published by Commerce look like the best deal now. You want NAICS Code 332994, for small arms manufacturing, and 332992, for small-arms ammo.
Here's the full table:
http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-_skipp0&-ds_name=AM0931GS101&-_lang=en
Here's an easier-to-read output summary:
http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-_skip '00&-ds_name=AM0931VS101&-_lang=en
They show somewhat different results; I didn't check to see what measurements were different. The full table says small arms, $3.3 billion. Ammo, $3.2 billion. Taken together, they're roughly equivalent to the US production of mayonnaise and sauces (NAICS 311941) <g>.
If you want to see how this compares with US totals in manufacturing, and general manufacturing trends, see this Excel table:
http://www.bea.gov/industry/xls/GDPbyInd_VA_NAICS_1998-2010.xls
Happy number-crunching.
--
Ed Huntress




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Ed Huntress wrote:

I dunno, Ed. We have already have won that race...
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On Fri, 24 Jun 2011 16:29:39 -0400, "Ed Huntress"

Hand sown nylon. Watched them being made on the PCN channel. ( Pennslyvania Cable Network) they showcase manufacturing in PA with factory tours every week.
http://www.pcntv.com/shows_tours.html
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CaveLamb wrote:

I was talking to an old gent, who had worked in manufacturing all his life, back in Wichita around 1982 and he said that the US made some of the best stuff in the world but went on to add that the US was just as capable of making shit as the next guy. Likely that still hold true.
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On 06/25/2011 06:37 AM, David Billington wrote:

I got into trouble at one worksite where the foreman was complaining about some shoddy work and claimed my crew did it.
I replied: "Can't be us, our shoddy work is a good as our good work."
technomaNge
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"Everything is changing. People are taking the comedians seriously and
the politicians as a joke."
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