Mills and Drills

DoN. Nichols wrote:


Ok. I was finally zooming in on one of the wedge styles you have been discussing and now I have to investigate turrent tool posts. :-) I assume that one can be bought for a lathe of this type. In fact, here is one on eBay.: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemu88861302

I assume that the threaded hole you mentioned is different than that used for a traveling steady rest.
I will be looking for Digital or Dial Calipers, as well as Dial Indicators and Dial Test Indicators. I want to basically be able to mesure with a relatively high accuracy the I.D. as well as the O.D. when necessary.

That's why the key word is modular. :-) A table I can just bolt more plates to for stability, and can break down to multiple parts that I can be moved one at a time when I have to.(Perhaps that'll be one of my projects, but I suspect that it can only help so much with such a small lathe).
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    "Turret" -- also called "four-way toolposts. I feel the wedge style quick-change to be a better choice -- I was just mentioning an alternate approach to production setups just to be complete.

    Interestingly enough, the bottom-most of the cluster of photos actually shows a somewhat different style of quick-change toolpost where it is show turning some aluminum (I think) with a fairly shallow depth of cut.
    Most of the shots show it with a turret style toolpost (fairly bright metal), while this one shows a toolpost of black finished steel.
    The dovetails on it are backwards from the Aloris style (which is the most copied style), and each is clamped onto the tool holder by an Allen-head cap screw passing through the body of the toolpost. It draws the dovetail walls together, with the sides flexing at the vertical holes at the ends of the slots. It looks like a fairly reasonable design, except that you will be locked into one source for the tool holders, while with a Phase-II, or an Aloris, or any of a number of other makers -- all of whose tool holders interchange on their (and other maker's) toolposts.
    The main thing, before you order the toolpost, is to determine the height of the lathe's center above the top of the compound. Most of the makers provide a chart of the height from the bottom of the tool holder to the top of the slot which holds the tools. As long as this is at least slightly below the center height of the lathe, the adjustment of the tool holder will allow you to adjust any tool in the holder to the proper height.
    Note also that unlike most compounds (which have a T-slot to accept whatever toolpost is selected), this compound appears to simply have a threaded hole -- so you may have one of your first projects threading the proper thread (likely a metric one) to match the hole for the rod which secures the toolpost to the compound. (If you had the usual T-slot, you would instead be needing to machine the plate which comes on the bottom end of the rod to a proper fit in *your* T-slot, as different lathes have different sizes of T-slots.)
    [ ... ]

    Very different. The threaded hole I mentioned is on the right side of the toolpost, not on the carriage, which is the normal situation for mounting a follower rest. Many lathes have the mounting holes on the side of the carriage, but my Clausing has a pair of threaded holes on the top surface of the arms of the carriage (which have a flat top, and which move back on either side of the headstock -- a system which is not present on your indicated lathe, in part because the headstock occupies the whole width of the bed, plus a bit. The follower rest slides over a pair of studs threaded into the arms, and is held down by washers and nuts. I have both the official one from Clausing, and another one from an unknown maker which required me to make a pair of spacers for the feet to adjust the height of the back support. That one is a "telescoping" style, and is nicer for smaller workpieces.

    Note that calipers (digital or dial, or even the old vernier ones) are not as accurate as a proper micrometer for the OD measurement, and for really accurate ID measurement, something like a "tri-mic" from B&S (actually Tesa in Switzerland), but those are quite expensive. As a result, you might want to get some telescoping gauges, and learn to use them with a good micrometer. (By "good", I mean one which has the vernier on the thimble to allow reading to 0.0001" (tenths), instead of just 0.001".
    Note that the digital calipers will read to a *resolution* of 0.0005", but this does not mean that they are that accurate. You will want to check any which you have against a set of gauge blocks (even the cheap Chinese sets are accurate to 0.000050" (50 millionths of an inch), so they should be adequate for verifying the accuracy of the calipers. (And, in the process, you can learn how sensitive the calipers can be to the amount of force used to close them onto the object being measured.

    Oh -- I was mis-reading that as "nodular" -- a style of cast iron used for machine castings.

    O.K.
    Yes, that is so.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok. Then I can stop watching those eBay auctions. :-)

I wonder how plausible it would be to make one's own tool holders. I guess taht even good ideas sometimes run into compatibility issues with the established market.
Since there is nothing wrong with the Aloris design, perhaps patent(royalty) issues are the reason for this "new" design.

If only ebay auctions had all the necessary info to make these decisions. Case in point. I've been trying to find out what metal these tool posts were made of before the auctions ended: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemu88410341 http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemu87609273 http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemu89449665 http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemu89476660
Also, I was reading something about the inconsistency of tool holder height(between H.F., Grizzly, ect.) at http://www.tedatum.com/thms/ Tooling Up > Getting Started. It was about a recommendation to mill down the bottom edge of the tool holder if needed. Basically this is one of the subtle differences between the import lathes of this type.
Speaking of lathe mods. I'm reading something concerning reaming out the spindle bore. There are obvious advantages to doing this, but even though some have done it, I really don't know if it is a good idea.

It's like the makers of that tool post went out of their way to try something different(even though there doesn't seem to be an obvious need for their changes).

Ok, that means that the micrometer that I have will not be sufficient, and I'll have to get a good one along with telescoping gauges. I'll see if there are any pics on eBay. :-)

Ok, gauge blocks are now also on my list.
Outside of that, I need to find a way to measure circle concentricity.(Was that the correct way to say that?). So I guess one of those "plunger" type indicators would suffice.

You're a virtual metal working encyclopedia. :-)
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com writes:

Check the "Modifications" on the mini-lathe.com web site.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Yes.
    Plausible -- with some dovetail milling cutters, and a *hefty* milling machine. I'm not sure about with as small a machine as you are considering -- let alone attempting to do it on a lathe with a milling adaptor.

    This is simply cheaper to manufacture. Since Phase II is producing very close clones of the Aloris wedge style toolpost (along with the older Aloris "piston" style), I suspect that the patents are expired by now.
    The piston style is cheaper to manufacture than the wedge style, and this one is even cheaper.

    I'm not going to bother to visit all of the auctions. The first one is steel, and is a pretty close clone of the Aloris AXA size, which is probably what you will need for your lathe, though you *might* need the lower height compound.
    I have no idea how good the quality of the steel may be, nor where it was made. I suspect India as one of the lowest budget sources of tooling these days. If so, the metal is probably somewhat questionable, but until you try it, you won't know. Plan to replace the setscrews, in any case, with low budged tool holders.

    Note that your lathe maker offers a compound which has been milled down, to allow the AXA size toolpost and holders to be used, based on some other things which you have posted links to earlier. I consider it better to fit the single milled down compound, instead of having to mill the bottom of the rather hardened steel on each holder, (thus weakening them), and having to face doing it again every time you get more tool holders.

    It depends on how much meat is in the machine. And it *might* induce warpage in the spindle, if the existing hole is somewhat off center.

    That is not the tool post, but the design of the compound on your selected lathe. The T-slot is necessary for the old "lantern" style toolposts, which have fallen way out of favor. For the turret toolposts, and the quick-change ones, there is really no need for the T-slot, other than allowing a bit of adjustment to the side. And, a drilled and tapped hole in the top of the compound costs less (in machining terms) than a T-slot. (And, it can survive with a poorer grade of cast iron in the compound.)

    I would suggest a set from 0-6" (six micrometers) to cover everything which you could make on that lathe. For most things, a smaller set of 0-3" (3 micrometers) would suffice. (I've got a set of 0-3" with the 0.0001" resolution (vernier thimble), a set of B&S 0-6 with only 0.001" graduations (direct reading), and a collection of others to cover the 6-12" range for the maximum size of workpiece over the bed on my 12x24" lathe.

    They are useful. Be prepared to keep them coated to prevent rusting -- and to use something which does not leave a hardened layer of wax when they sit for a while, as that layer can introduce errors when working to those dimensions.

    The concentricity (at least as mounted in the lathe) is handled with a "runout" indicator, which is not as good for precise measurement, but is good to show centering errors.
    [ ... ]

    I've simply read a lot -- and absorbed a lot of what I have read.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com writes:

Thanks for this pointer. The non-anodized one is $25 cheaper. Does the Anodized version provide any benefits besides apparance?
BTW - I just uncrated and set up the MicroLux lathe. All checks out well, using the info on mini-lathe.com. but the compound slide was stiff. So I checked the cross feeding screw and it was off 0.003". I'll have to give MicroMark a call.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Yes -- especially if it is hard anodized (a thicker coat, IIRC). It reduces surface wear, though it adds little to the rigidity.

    O.K. Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

Ok, I'll use stainless steel as the extreme because I figure that if I can do it in stainless the softer metals should be no problem.
I don't know what the milling attachment for the lathe will allow me to do, but some things below may require totally different tools. Nevertheless, I still want to see how much I can get done on a lathe before I really need a dedicated milling machine.
I will need to: Bore 1/4" wide, 1/4" deep circular grooves in S.S. Turn down 7/16" diameter S.S. rods to 1/4". Thread S.S. rods to fit rod-ends, knobs, ect. Mill round S.S. rods into square rods. Tap 1/4" diameter holes into 7/16" diameter S.S.rods. Drill 1/8" diameter holes through 1/4" S.S. rods. Mill 3/4" wide, 1/8" deep grooves in S.S. plates. Radius corners to 1/2" in 1/16" thick S.S. plates. Mill out 1/4" diameter, 1/4" deep "cups" in S.S.
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action talog&Type=Product&ID710
    And -- it is still not at all clear that you *can* do SS -- depending on your choice of *which* of many Stainless Steels. Some of those are very nasty to work.

    Not much, in SS. SS needs lots of rigidity, and a milling attachment in a lathe normally lacks a lot of rigidity compared to a true milling machine.

    In flat SS, or in round stock? It sounds as though you are planning to do this in flat workpieces (races for balls, I suspect, from earlier postings you have made). And I presume that this means round profiles to the groove as well as a circle form to the groove.
    To do this on a lathe, you will need a form tool corresponding to the shape you need to produce, and that is going to be nasty to use. A quick calculation says that a 1/4" wide groove will need the tool cutting on a 0.3927" wide surface. I would not really like to do this on my 12" lathe, let alone your little 7" (IIRC) lathe. Most of my tools cut on (at most) a 1/8" (0.125") long edge before the power of my 1-1/2 HP motor gets to struggling.
    And you've been talking (in another thread) about rigidity not mattering as much on a small lathe. When you do something like this in Stainless Steel, you're going to need every bit of rigidity you can find. If you don't have the rigidity to take a reasonable cut, and the power to keep it going, the SS is going to work harden and then fight you all the way.
    On a *mill*, you would want a 1/4" ball-end mill, and a rotary table to turn the workpiece under the mill.
    And -- your talk of 1/4" deep as well as 1/4" wide says that the top of the balls will not show above the surface, so it will offer no bearing operation -- even if by some miracle you get a smooth enough finish to have the groove act as a reasonable bearing race. Your groove should not be that deep.

    How long? If the length is more than four times the diameter (final diameter, not starting diameter) and you are turning in a chuck, you will need a "traveling steady rest" (also called a "follower rest"). If it is more than double that, you will need the traveling steady even for workpieces turned between centers. (And you will need a ball bearing "live" center in the tailstock.)
    And again -- which alloy of SS?

    This also calls for a lot of rigidity. You will need either HSS toolbits ground to the proper angles for the threading (60 degrees for most threads these days), or insert threading tooling. I tend to use the latter most of the time. Your SS is going to make this more difficult, too.

    This, you could do in the milling adaptor on the lathe, with either some form of index head for the lathe's milling adaptor (probably difficult to find), or a collet block which will hold the workpiece. And how long do these square parts need to be? A milling adaptor in a lathe is not good for very long cuts.

    Here, you can drill the tap holes in the lathe. You will then probably start the tap in the lathe, but will then need to move the rod to a vise, and use a hand tap holder to turn the tap.
    If the rods are too large to fit through the spindle, you will need a fixed steady rest to support the rod out near the end where you are drilling.

    Drill press -- unless you are drilling from one end to another. And if so, how long is the rod? Drill bits tend to walk from a dead on-center position, so you need to come up with another means to drill it if the concentricity matters and the length is more than perhaps 1/2" (with a 1/8" drill bit.)

    Straight lines? Two flute end mills will work -- as long as the grooves are not longer than the travel on your cross slide (for doing it on a lathe).

    For this, you will need some kind of tiny rotary table on the milling attachment in the lathe. You would need one in a milling machine as well, unless you have a CNC milling machine, which can simply be told to cut the radius.

    Round cups? For this, you will also need 1/4" ball end mills. This is closer to drilling than to milling, as it is just a plunge operation.
    All of this is guesses based on what I remember of what you have said in the past. I really think that you will need a capable machinist to teach you how to do a lot of this, and to explain (and demonstrate) why some of the things you want to do are beyond the capability of anything that you can get up the stairs into your apartment.
    Good luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:

Thanks for the help, Don.
I found another one that's between the two prices of $75 and $300. I'd like to get your opinion on this one.
http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID"80
It's $155+$25 (for the new base). As I see it, the advantages are 1) It's steel, not aluminum 2) It comes with 5 tool holders, not 3. 3) It's compatible with Aloris, Dorian and Phass II toolholders. 4) It's wedge, not piston 5) I think it can hold 4 holders, not 2.
Of course, the best product in the world does me no good if it's not available.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    That looks good. And I see that they have provided for the problem which I would otherwise see with using an AXA size toolpost on a small lathe (that the tool would not adjust low enough to become on center). That is handled by the new base.

    Yes.
    Yes -- sort of. The knurling holder I consider to be a waste of steel. It could be used to hold a boring or facing tool, at least. For as small a lathe as you have, I would suggest a scissors style knurling system, not this (which is called "bump knurling", and which puts significant stresses on almost *any* machine.

    Agreed.
    Quite important.

    I don't think so. It looks like one of the standard Aloris clones, and those have only two dovetails -- but they don't *need* any more -- at least the way I use them. (Mine are BXA size, not AXA, as is appropriate for my size of lathe.)

    You noticed the "backordered" status. You could order one of the clones from other vendors, including New England Brass and Tool. I had not suggested that because I did not know of the modification to the compound base which allowed it to be used. I wonder who actually makes it.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am using a Dorian MD-20 toolpost on my Myford. It is wonderful for this size machine and I like it better than a very nice Myford clone I had before. I got it for $50 used, but the new price is probably more than your lathe.
chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rex B wrote:

@#$%!
I don't have a coupon because I'm not a company, and I also can only use money orders as payment, since I don't have credit cards.
So that deal won't happen. :-(
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    Given your problems with getting the machine upstairs to your apartment, I think that the Atlas benchtop mill may well do as much of what you need as you can manage in anything you can get up those stairs without someone who knows machines to disassemble it at the bottom and reassemble it at the top.
    I think that the Atlas mill is a better machine than the little Atlas lathes -- but even so, the 6x18" Atlas (or the Atlas/Craftsman) will probably work for you. *Absolutely* avoid the Craftsman lathes whose serial number starts with 109 -- those are the AA brand machines, and are very weakly built. The 6x16" Atlas lathes are weaker than most of the alternatives (I know, I have one, along with more substantial lathes), but a complete one (with full set of change gears) will allow you to cut threads, and otherwise will at least get you started. You *will* eventually discover that you will need a more solid machine, but for that, you will have to find someplace else to use it. Your apartment is just not right for the task.

    A nice machine -- but too much for him to get upstairs. Narrow, twisty stairs (based on his description), and no elevator. I'm not sure whether he has a safe place to disassemble a good lathe so he could carry it up the stairs one part at a time.

    Agreed -- *if* he could get it up his stairs.

    Hmm ... I'm not sure whether the noise will be another problem. I guess that it depends on whether his downstairs neighbors are deaf. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

@#$%!
Here we go again. I was zeroing in on a 9" Logan before the noise issue came up.
Is this a genral problem with Logans more than others?
Obviously swapping out the motor is way out of the question.(The Logan I was thinking about doesn't ahve quick change gears either, so perhaps this is for the best).
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    No -- it depends on the work you are doing. But any workpiece out of balance will transfer energy to the floor through the feet -- either of the lathe or the table on which you mount the lathe, depending on whether it comes with a stand or not.
    If the bit starts to chatter, that will probably produce some interesting sounds downstairs -- with *any* size and brand of lathe.
    Old belts can take a set, and introduce more vibration than fresh belts would. A gearhead lathe will probably generate a different kind of noise from the meshing of the gears -- but they would be to heavy to get up to your apartment anyway.
    Rubber pads between the feet and the floor will reduce that somewhat -- but will allow lathe bed warp from not having a rigid mounting. (Of course, your floor is not that rigid anyway -- a concrete floor would be better. But that slight inaccuracy probably won't be a problem with the kind of parts you are making.

    Huh? The motor simply provides the power, and assuming that it is properly balanced (including the pulley), it will generate less noise than the actual work being done on the lathe. Light cuts at the right speeds will be quiet, wrong speeds or too heavy a cut will lead to chatter, and that will transfer through the floor to downstairs.

    Quick change is convenient -- but it adds to the weight. The little Atlas (6x18) never came with quick-change. Larger ones had quick-change as an option.
    Really -- get something small and cheap, and start using it. You *will* need something better, but the only way to learn what you will need is to get experience doing *your* kind of jobs on it. For this, a small, used machine will hold its value better when you discover that you need more machine (and a proper place to *put* that larger machine), so you can re-sell it without a significant loss.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

Nope. Ok, fromthatprevious post it seemed as though Logans were just generally more noisy lathes. But as long as that's not the case...

I wa thinking that the motor and the specific matellurgical properties of the gears made the lathe noiseir than others. But again, wince what you mentioned applies to all lathes, then no problem.

Even though it wasn't spec, perhaps there is a way to add QC gears to the Logan in the future?(It's a Logan model 400).

Hmmm... That brings me back to the Microlux from Micro-Mark...
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    The noise which matters to you is what is conducted through the feet to the floor -- unless you have it close to a wall shared with another apartment.

    The connection from the motor to the rest of the lathe is normally V-belts, or flat belts on a really old lathe. The gears are mostly in the thread drive from the spindle -- at least in anything which you are likely to get up the stairs.

    I don't know. Check Logan's web site. See whether a related machine (same size) was available with a quick-change gearbox. If so, expect to have to change the leadscrew, and probably some other gearing in the headstock when you make the change. Or get another machine with the right setup, and sell this one.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    The noise which matters to you is what is conducted through the feet to the floor -- unless you have it close to a wall shared with another apartment.

    The connection from the motor to the rest of the lathe is normally V-belts, or flat belts on a really old lathe. The gears are mostly in the thread drive from the spindle -- at least in anything which you are likely to get up the stairs.

    I don't know. Check Logan's web site. See whether a related machine (same size) was available with a quick-change gearbox. If so, expect to have to change the leadscrew, and probably some other gearing in the headstock when you make the change. Or get another machine with the right setup, and sell this one.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

I'm not aware of a noise problem. My 9" Logan doesn't seem to be any more noisy than my 10" Enco, nor the last 10" Atlas. The gears were a little noisy until I found a good viscous gear lube.
At any rate, I don't think the noise level would be an issue in an apartment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.