OT has anyone done a concrete counter top?

Anyone here done or know much about the concrete counter tops?
Reply to
wayne mak
Loading thread data ...
Hm, kind of a terazzo type technique? Sounds interesting. I wonder how many of those techniques would be helpful to you?
Reply to
Dave Hinz
I've got some buddies that are in business doing just that....what ya need to know ??
Jeff
Reply to
Never_Enough_Tools
I haven't done it - yet, but there is a Web article here
formatting link
also mentions an issue of 'Fine Homebuilding' magazine that really got my interest up.
My wife, however, was unimpressed so it'll just have to be a concrete ... something else.
Reply to
Fred R
Well, I'm interested, and I finally coughed up the $35 for the *only* book on the subject. The technique appears to be a closely-guarded secret. Anyway, it looks like a good way to start out is by building some concrete-topped workbenches. Ought to be a good foundation for a lathe. But I have not built one as yet. - - Rex Burkheimer WM Automotive Fort Worth TX
wayne mak wrote:
Reply to
Rex B
I did my concrete countertop. Formed it right in place on top of the cabinets. Wired remesh to screws in the base of the form (which stay permanently in place, only the sides get stripped). Mixed sacrete sand-mix in a wheelbarrow (with a bit of extra portland cement in the mix). Pigment mixed straight in. Trowelled finish in place. I was worried about the trowel finish, since it was the first fine concrete finish I'd tried! It wasn't that big a deal in the end, though it went through a nasty looking stage while I was working on it. Finished with Danish oil. We've been pretty happy, though I would consider an epoxy finish if I was doing it again. Been in place for four (?) years now, still looks good. The finish is sensitive to acid (like vinegar), shrugs off heat and abrasion. Nice thing about it is that the Danish oil refinishes pretty well if there is a spot that needs touching up.
I have some photographs of the process I could dig out if you're curious.
Lot! of labour in the forming. Materials were cheap. Probably took a full three work weeks, but the wrap around the sink and built in oven is pretty complicated. If the shape of the cabinetry is simple it would be a lot less work. And I formed in a lip that wraps the edge, which not every one seems to do, that definitely added to the work.
Ask questions, and I'll try to answer. I don't think there *are* any secrets. Just like any craftsmanship: think it through, visualize the steps, take some care. I read all of my back issues of Fine Homebuilding on trowel finishes and concrete slabs before I got started, that definitely helped. The concrete countertop articles were also some help (though not much, since they were configured around pouring top down and moving the cast pieces in place, which is a very different way of doing it).
Adam Smith, Midland, ON
Reply to
Adam Smith
I'd love to see that. If you don't have a webserver, I'd be happy to put them online for you to share if you want; my email address is real. I need to do an island, and if I can show SWMBO some cool pictures, she might go for it.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
Sign me up also. I have a bathroom redo that might be applicable.
Reply to
Rex B
Ok. I'm not in the same spot as the photographs at the moment, and I have a nasty feeling that they may have been shot on film not digital, so I may have to scan them. I'll be in touch in the next day or two.
Adam
Reply to
Adam Smith
I bought this book from Lee Valley Tools by Fu-Tung Cheng on making concrete countertops.
formatting link
Reply to
Buy_Sell
On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 15:51:03 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, Rex B quickly quoth:
$35, huh? The book goes for under $20 on Amazon.
formatting link
the secret worth $23 and change?
- This product cruelly tested on defenseless furry animals - --------------------------------------------------------
formatting link
Web App & Database Programming
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I grabbed the book from the library, I also found an eBayer that sells supplies, it sounds like you can grind to a nice finish. I am making a floating island (metal work is the frame) the bolted in cabinets will have a more standard top. I MADE all the cabinets.
formatting link
that shows the uppers i made and put in, the floor will be ready at the end of the week and then the lowers go in. Its been a LONG winter of WOOD working.
Reply to
wayne mak
The Fu-Tung Cheng book ?
Actually he has (at least) two books on the subject. This one's less on technique, but good on ideas
The Jeanne Huber book is more about how to buy one than how to make one
Reply to
Andy Dingley
I saw several done on TV - maybe DIY has some info. I want to say it was this old house.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Dave H> >
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I've done one in my wife's pottery studio. Pretty plain. Pictures available if you want to see it. Lot of heavy work, no matter how you do it.
Also, several years ago, I got the bug to do countertops in the kitchen. I envisioned a counter cast top down with a nice half-round bullnose on the front. I actually made a small piece using a 2" PVC pipe split in two for the bullnose form. Looked pretty good, about 2 1/4" thick. The piece I made was about 36" x 30" and weighed 180#. I never could get the corners worked out to my satisfaction and was under pressure from my wife, so I moved on to another type of counter.
Reply to
Gary Brady
i made a throwing table for my wife's ceramics work too. rolled edge, flat top that is smooth were design criteria. the edges look rough, so you'll want to think about that in your planning.
you can use air or water powered tools to polish the top. calibre stone tools has a center feed water tap air grinder using diamond pads for not too much money. look into headstone supply places for other places.
look around on here for some tools:
formatting link
regards, charlie
formatting link

Reply to
Charles Spitzer

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.