OT Regrowing lost limbs

Research is ongoing that could turn on genes that would regrow lost
limbs.
To the topicpolice amongst us, this is of obvious interest to those of
us who are not careful around metalworking machinery.
Funded by DARPA to help a unusually high number of Iraq war survivors
who lost limbs.
formatting link

Reply to
Ignoramus22416
Loading thread data ...
Can they regrow brain to help reading the charter of that group and help finding the right group to post to? That would be great!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
Something interesting from that article
``Badylak said DARPA became interested in regenerative medicine because of the massive increase in the ratio of wounded military personnel. In all wars from the Revolutionary War up to the first Gulf War the ratio of wounded soldiers to those killed was 2.5 to 1. The early '90s saw a dramatic change with the advent of body armor, which protected the torso and head but left arms, legs and neck exposed. In the Afghanistan and Iraq wars the ratio of wounded to dead is 9 to 1.''
This means that if the modern medicine and body protection did not make such wonderful advances, the losses among the US soldiers would be (9+1)/(2.5+1) = 2.9 times higher. That means that without those advances, the number of dead would have been approximately 2,600*2.9 = 7,540 soldiers.
The total number of US dead and wounded seems to be 2,600*
10 = 26,000 soldiers. This could involve some double counting if wounded soldiers return and are again wounded or killed, but probably not much.
The number that I recall about Soviet losses in Afghanistan, is that during the entire 8 year war, the Soviet Union lost about 15,000 soldiers (IIRC). Assuming that the Soviets had a 2.5:1 ratio of wounded to dead, the total Soviet casualties were 37,500 soldiers dead and wounded.
In three and a half years in Afghanistan, on a pro rata basis, the Soviet loss would have been about 6,562 killed soldiers and 15,406 total casualties.
In three and a half year in Iraq,, the US loss is 2,600 dead soldiers soldiers and 26,000 total casualties.
That means that we are in a shitty situation in Iraq.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22416
"Ignoramus22416" wrote: (clip) Funded by DARPA to help a unusually high number of Iraq warsurvivors who lost limbs. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ So we can thank President Bush, not only for protecting us from terrorism, but for stimulating medical research.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Without any irony, yes, such research is very valuable if we expect it to bring results.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22416
Lets see, 20 people reply to the $1 million idea, and thats OK, but 1 person posts an interesting topic to this group only, and he's spamming. I think your taking this "Net Nanny" job way to serious. gary
Reply to
Gary Owens
I mostly react on off-topics that are new and are posted by the most wellknown members of the OT-gang here. And what is interesting for this group is defined in its charter and neither by iggy nor you:
1. The following is the original rec.crafts.metalworking charter, for reference.
Charter -------
Charter -- REC.CRAFTS.METALWORKING
The USENET newsgroup, rec.crafts.metalworking, is a newsgroup which discusses various aspects of working with metal, such as (but not limited to):
machining, as on a lathe, milling machine, grinder, etc.; numerical control of such machines; welding, whether by gas, arc, mig, tig, thermite, or other methods; Metal joining, whether welding, brazing, soldering, riveting, screwing, folding, etc. (this section was added during the discussion) casting various metals by various methods; hardening/tempering various metals; blacksmithing/forging; spinning and hammer work; sheet metal work; jewelry-making; purchasing and/or reconditioning metalworking tools and machinery; interesting projects; books on metal technologies and history;
Example areas of interest:
knife/sword making; automotive repair; steam engine (model/scale, though full-sized discussions are welcome!); art work, such as bronze castings and sculptures; gunsmithing; toolmaking, such as for woodworking, further metalworking, etc.;
While the bulk of the discussion will probably be directed towards small-scale "home" shops, industrial/production discussions are also quite welcome.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
formatting link
Can they increase the growth of existing "limbs"?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Compared to previous wars, 2,600 dead would be a one day event. I'd rather be dinged than dead. As far as shitty, all wars are and all wars will be. When you lose a war the shitty spreads to the civilians standing on the sidelines.
The Iraq theater of operations has been going on long enough that any service person involved has had time to not re-enlist. None of these fine people that have served were drafted.
To refresh your memory, we had more than 2600 innocent civilians killed on 9/11.
But back to regeneration. If DARPA funding could have success then it would be a wonderful benefit to society.
Wes S
Reply to
clutch
formatting link
>
Sure they can. I get several emails a day with updates. I'll forward them if you like. :)
Reply to
Rex B
It's no secret that wartime is when a great deal of scientific research happens. It's also no secret that said research has side-benefits which have a staggeringly positive impact.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Müller) wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@yadro.de:
In your case it wouldn't help at all: DARPA is only studying REgrowth of previously existing tissues.
Reply to
Eregon
Dave Hinz wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@individual.net:
Nuclear Energy: WW2's most lasting advancement in Physics.
Mass-produced anti-biotics (including Penicillin): WW2's most lasting advancement in Medicine.
Synthetic Fabrics (including Nylon): WW2's most lasting advancement in Chemistry
The "fallout" from the "Space Race" is still occurring and, possibly, will continue for many years.
Reply to
RAM³
Ok, still off topic, but I saw a recent documentary - its not just lost limbs...apparently the "IED" roadside bombs are creating havoc with head injuries/brain damage - the vehicle protects the soldiers from direct blast damage, but they get thrown around the inside violently.
Modern field medical practice means that a lot of people who, in previous wars, would have died on the battefield or soon after, now get home to be horribly injured for the rest of their lives. Bugger of a situation, irrespective of the politics involved.
And, on a pessimistic note, I wonder how long before the Afghan poppy harvest starts being pushed to disenchanted soldiers in a pretty awful seemingly unwinnable conflict...shades of Vietnam all over again...
Andrew VK3BFA.
Reply to
Andrew VK3BFA
Yea. BUT only if it dosen't involve stem cells. :-( ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
Yup, and countless other technologies.
And yet we still have idiots complaining about "all that money being spent on the war / shot off into space on a rocket". They just don't understand that that money employs people in high-tech jobs, and furthers research that has unanticipated benefits. Ah well...
Reply to
Dave Hinz
He hasn't banned research, he's just of the position that federal funds shouldn't pay for it. There's nothing stopping private or otherwise funded research. But of course, you know that, right?
Reply to
Dave Hinz
I believe the term is "Spin-off technology".
And very true
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
The American Civil War, like most of the European wars, resulted in vast numbers of amputees. The single biggest killer in most wars through that , including the American Civil War, was infection/disease, followed by the bayonet. Family and other group photos for many years after the Civil war showed significant numbers of males missing one or more limb. For those of you who are old enough to remember WW1 vets...raspy breathing, rhumby eyes and missing limbs were very common..the result of gas attacks and the machine gun..but still, infection and disease was one of the biggest killers..but because of the huge artillery barrages...fewer survived traumatic injuries. WW2..the same. If you survived the initial injury..your later years were spent in more comfort..so to speak.
Vietnam was the turning point in medical survival rates. Horrendous injuries that at any other time in history that would have gotten you a #3 triage...were survivable..and survivable with little obvious note in later years. I can give you many examples of faces blown off, skulls blown away etc etc and yet today the survivors lead generally mostly normal and mundane lives. Plastic surgery, facial reconstruction and rapid advances in neuro techniques are keeping people alive long after historically they should have been a guest of graves registration.
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
Bush increased funding for stem cell research by an order of magnitude.
Are you not aware of this?
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.