OT: VHS Copy Guard Defeat Hardware

Time to copy all my 400+ VHS movies to DVD. Most are recorded off cable, going back to 1985. Still have the first VCR I bought; a Fisher Studio
Standard FVH-720. Still works, too. $500 new :). Some are purchased movies. There are many different Copy Guard removal systems; I am considering this one: http://www.dimax.com.ua/dvd/dvdredpro.shtml Any experience with doing this, this particular hardware, or other comments? I'm not contemplating making bootleg copies for sale, just to transfer my own stuff for my own use. JR Dweller in the cellar
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JR North wrote:

I'm not either, but keep in mind that Macrovision is more of a collusion between the vcr makers and Hollywood rather than an effective copy protection scheme. It's easily defeated and chances are that any box you buy will work.
The amazing thing is that you can get a box. Macrovision patented most known ways to *break* Macrovision and hotly pursued the box people under patent infringement laws.

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It is obvious that you have a computer so I will offer another solution rather than going directly from a VCR to a DVD Recorder. I did the same thing with VHS tapes that I owned and got the copy protected message on the screen. I instead purchased a Plextor ConvertX PVR Model PX-TV402U Box that plugs into my computer. It takes any analog signal and converts it to digital. You can plug a VCR or Video Camera into it. It has a built-in TV Tuner. The beauty is that you can use it as a backup Digital Video Recorder (DVR) to record TV Programs to your hard disk. You can edit your recordings before you burn them to disc with the included software. With my DVR you can do some editing, but it is not nearly as easy or fast as using computer software. You can use computer video editing with a DVR but to get it to the computer you have to burn it to a DVD or hook your DVR up to your computer. Also if you have a long movie that won't fit on one DVD and your DVR only records single layer DVDs you will have to split the movie. Double layer DVD recorders for your computer are cheap so you can record longer movies on one double layer DVD. Many other companies make boxes similar to the one I purchased. Just food for thought
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Hum - been doing that for years - have hundreds done already. My Fisher a push down stack type - went the way. Such is life. Three moves did it in.
I have only had protection issues when I do a DVD and then try to copy it! Tape to DVD hasn't been a problem.
I use Philips DVD recorders and have liked them. Have a tape & dvd in one box that seems to be smart. Tape to dvd in one box.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
JR North wrote:

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