Pistol Recommendations?

I stopped by a gun dealer yesterday on the way home, I'm looking for something for home defense before the Nazi's ban everything but caulk guns.
I'm trying to decide between two types of guns, one would be a compact concealed carry gun if that ever becomes legal in Illinois. The other I'm considering is probably a 45ACP, maybe a 1911 or 1911 Compact. The dealer had several 1911's, they had a Springfield 1911 in my price range and a "Mil Spec" that might have been a little cheaper IIRC.
So, would I be best off to get a full size 1911 and then buy a concealed carry gun later if the state allows concealed carry? Or would a 1911 compact possibly serve both purposes, shoot as good as a full size 1911 but be more "concealed carry" friendly? Is the Springfield 1911 a good one or is there a better option for the money?
I guess the reality of it is, the bigger the gun the less often I would carry it, I may be better off with a full size 1911 and get a concealed carry gun later if/when Illinois permits it.
Thanks!
RogerN
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you are not a recreational shooter..Id go with the smaller compact weapon that you can go CCW with, or simply tuck it away on your person. Full sized 45s are fine, but for most folks ..it tend to be a bit Iffy to be trying to conceal.
We have never met or even spoken, so I have no idea bout your familiarity with handguns or even your body size.
Does it need to be a self loader? There is absolutely nothing wrong with a good 3-4" .357 double action revolver in stainless, such as a S&W 586/686, Ruger GP 100s and so on and so forth.
And right now..they are selling for cheaper than "self loading combat guns" A good used wheel gun can be had pretty darned cheaply and they tuck away quite nicely.
How much "no bullshit" experience have you with handguns in genera? We can probably suggest some arms for you to take a look at.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, January 10, 2013 8:45:08 AM UTC-5, Gunner wrote:

ns.

'm

er

"Mil

but

or

I agree on the wheelgun. Think hard about what you're likely to face in a h ome-defense situation. Are you fully awake? When did you last handle the gu n? What condition is it in?
With a 1911, which is a fine handgun, you'll have to think about these thin gs. Is there a round in the chamber? Do you have a clean grip to work the g rip safety? Is the hammer back? Don't forget the thumb safety! That's a lot of quick thinking in the foggy middle of the night, under stress.
Is anyone in the house who might need to shoot it left-handed? If they are, do you have an ambi safety on the gun? Does whoever else might shoot it kn ow about all of the things above?
I favor a wheelgun for home defense. Pick it up, pull the trigger, and it g oes bang. Glock fans will probably weigh in here to argue for their favorit e gun, but for the money and for simple shooting, the wheelgun is the best choice, in my opinion.
Scraper
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMHO, due to exactly those considerations, it's probably best to store it with a full magazine, an empty chamber, and the safety *off*. When you're under that kind of duress, you probably won't have the fine motor control needed to disengage the safety -- but you will have enough to rack the action and chamber a round.
And if the only members of the household are firearms-savvy adults, there may not be a need to store it with the chamber empty -- as long as _everyone_knows_ the gun is loaded and not safed.

Another reason for storing it as I suggest.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

A cheaper DAO plastic frame pistol will put just as many holes in the perp, has no safeties to think about and the cost savings can go towards more good JHP ammo.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The various plastic frame guns are "good"..but..there comes a point where unless you really really work at it..the recoil becomes so severe..the "bite" so rough..that you will develop a flinch. Guarenteed.
I often suggest a good used Colt Detective Special in 38. One can load Plus Ps with a 125gr JHP and have a full six shots that are very easy to control in an expectionaly well made steel weapon that has a very good DA trigger pull... That particular model along with the 1911..are the only Colts I personally care for. And have multiple versions of both. Dont bother with a .357 Magnum load in a snubby. Seriously. They are very difficult to control, to shoot well and frankly...for up close and personal..not needed.
38 Specials are cheap, you can spend a little money and learn to shoot a LOT with them. All of which is whats needed to get to know the feel and shooting skills with any short pistol or revolver.
Btw...if you can find these...
http://www.federalpremium.com/products/details/handgun.aspx?id 8
Probably the best 38 snubby load ever made.
They were discontinued, then brought back, then one couldnt find them..then you could..then you couldnt...
If you see em..snag em. Ill buy em.
" nyclad" 38 Special
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A chambered round is hazardous in a fire, when firemen could be in any direction including on the roof.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An unlikely event, multiplied by another unlikely event, is a very unlikely event.
And anyway, if the weapon is intended for use as home defense, it's going to be some place where the homeowner can easily grab it on his way out of the house if there's a fire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

That, and consideration can be easily given to the storage orientation of the firearm. The 9mm by my bed is down in a little quick access safe at floor level and the muzzle faces the exterior wall which has full dimensional brick, and about 10' out from the house the land slopes up a good 4' as well. It would take quite a while to get that gun at floor level hot enough to cook off a round, and even if it did the bullet wouldn't be going anywhere problematic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 12:18:17 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Is that a common sense thought, or do you have cites for firemen getting shot (unintentionally) during saves, Jim?
--
I started out with nothing and
I still have most of it left!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

The leader of a motorcycle gang lived two doors from my dad's house when I was in high school. I saw flames & called the fire department, but they had to let it burn to the ground because of all the ammo going off in the basement. They refused to get close enough to fight it, with rounds bouncing off their fire truck, out in the middle of the street. The fire marshal said there was over 50,000 empty pieces of brass after he investigated the fire. He reported that someone had set a booby trap, and the residents had left on vacation two hours before the fire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Terrell" wrote:

Research has shown that unchambered ammunition does not pose any risk to firefighters. It has been proven that the bits of shrapnel tossed around by those uncontained bursting cartridges has energy equivalent to a BB gun at most and will not penetrate standard firefighter turnout gear. Hopefully by now that knowledge is well disseminated to the fire departments.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pete C." wrote:

They stood there for over two hours while it all cooked off. Considering who owned the house and what was happening, they weren't taking any chances. It was an all voluenteer department back in the '60s. What are the chances anyone had told them it wouldn't hurt them?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Terrell" wrote:

I'm pretty sure the research on it was done later than the '60s. Hopefully current firefighters know about it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pete C." wrote:

I no longer know any firefighters. The last ones that I knew were part of my company (Headquarters Commmand) at Ft. Greeley Alaska in '74.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pete C. wrote:

True, BUT if you're hearing ammo cook off do you KNOW what else may be in that fire? How about that can of black powder the owner has for his muzzle loader? Or the reloading supplies cabinet with 20 pounds of powder stored in it?
In the above case I would have dumped water on it from the street and protected the exposures.
It comes down to what you have for equipment, training and information on scene.
If I have a homeowner standing there to ask what do you have in ammo/powder/primers/whatever else. Then I can say, yes let's go in an attack the fire OR no the danger is to high to warrant that, stay out and surround & drown the place. If there is nobody around who lives in that home to answer those questions then you stay out and dump water from a distance. You don't go by the neighbors or friends words either. They may not KNOW what is actually in that house.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 15:03:06 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

I'm sorry. I thought when you said "chambered round" you were discussing concealed carry + firemen. Never mind. (rolls eyes)
--
I started out with nothing and
I still have most of it left!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

When they heard the shot they backed away and let it burn.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Wilkins wrote:

I can think of three ammo related injuries to firemen in the past 2 years. These were local to me so I would bet there are others.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What were the injuries?
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.