Seltzer Bottle adaptor?

Anyone ever consider making an adaptor for a seltzer bottle so it can be
charged from a real CO2 cylinder? These little ISI cartriges are
starting to cost as much as the cheap Scotch I drink.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
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Do a websearch for "airgun bulk fill adaptors" There are a whole pile of variations on the theme.
Some here
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Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
Glenn, Save your CO2 money and buy better Scotch. Pour generously over ice and let sit a few minutes. Buy one of those Glenn-something single malts and you won't want soda again.
P.S. -when are you going to finish your boat?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
By all means check out Richard Kinch's carbonator page and do exactly as it says. I did (well, I left the Schrader valve cores in and he didn't) and my carbonator works *perfectly*.
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Grant
Glenn Ashmore wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Just silver-braze a Schraeder valve into an empty sparklet, bulb, cartridge or whatever you call it. Fit a tire-inflator head and short hose to your CO2 regulator on the big bottle. Set the regulator to about 50 PSI. or calculate what the pressure would be when you add 8 grams of CO2 into the free space in your seltzer. You can then charge the seltzer bottle from the big tank.
I made several strong bottlecaps (machined out of delryn) that fit 1-liter plastic soda bottles. There's a brass disc and a hose washer inside. A Schraeder valve is brazed into the disc and protrudes thru a hole in the top. I can then "recharge" my tonic after a gin 'n tonic and it'll be at "full fizz" next time I want one.
If anyone does this, be sure to drill a hole thru the next-to-bottommost thread. Then when unscrwing it from a bottle that still has pressure you hear a warning PSSSSS rather than a "THOCK" as the cap bounces off your forehead before denting the ceiling. That really smarts!
I can also make oxygenated water in one of these bottles. Tawk about live bait with an attitude!
Reply to
Don Foreman
How about that! Here's how I did it:
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Mine depends on having the cores in because I leave the cap on the bottle so I can re-pressurize it to maintain the fizz in a mostly-consumed bottle of tonic.
Reply to
Don Foreman
I did something similar, but infinitely simpler. I went to the auto parts store and bought a set of 4 bolt-on tire valves, then drilled a hole in a standard 2-liter bottle cap and screwed on the tire valve tightly. It is very well made of stainless steel and its Schrader valve works perfectly. This only takes a few minutes and five bucks. I use a tire chuck on a hose to a regulator on a 20# CO2 bottle, and I charge cold water to near saturation point in about a minute, shaking constantly.
Grant
D> Just silver-braze a Schraeder valve into an empty sparklet, bulb,
Reply to
Grant Erwin
My old brass fittings sure look grungy compared to the nice stainless ones. I actually enjoy making things on a lathe so I still would make a robust cap that's easy to grab and definitely won't stretch and blow off under pressure. Now taught, I'd make a stainless disc and use the stainless Schraeder valve. I'll look for those stainless valves and make new guts for my bottlecaps if I find them.
Glenn may want to retain the squirt-on-demand feature that a seltzer bottle offers. I bet he has enough info now to make something that'll charge his bottle from a larger CO2 tank.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Ordinary blended Scotch 'n soda is not the same drink as 20-year-old singlemalt taken neat, but no less enjoyable if that's what one might fancy at a given moment. It's an American drink that can taste real good.
Asking for a wee dram of a good singlemalt over ice in Edinburgh or Glasgow would have earned a scowl not ten years ago, still does in neighbourhood pubs. I agree with you that a good singlemalt over ice is also a very enjoyable drink. Most of the best aged singlemalts are not exported but there are a few to be found here.
Reply to
Don Foreman
You made the cap, eh? How did you cut the inside threads? Did you have a spec for them or just improvise from measurements?
Good point about the gas vents on the threads. Point out the interruptions of the threads on a soda bottle cap to your friends, see how many can deduce what they're for!
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
I cut them on a lathe, turning the headstock by hand because it was a short blind inside thread. I just improvised from measurements. They're about 8 TPI. I bored the ID to the OD of the unthreaded part of a bottle (about .980 plus a little) and then just took passes at the thread until a bottle screwed in easily. It really only takes a few minutes.
I think I cut a relief zone at the bottom of the hole before threading, both as clearance for the threading tool and to accept the hose washer. .
They seal tight. There's a bottle of tonic water in the fridge I haven't used since last summer but there's no "squeeze" to it so I know it's still pressurized.
Reply to
Don Foreman
BTW (residue from previous thread) , I bought Fermi's book on thermodynamics. I'm only part way into it so far but he really does do a good job of explaining things clearly.
Reply to
Don Foreman
I've occasionally looked for a spec for a long time, but never found one. Likely it is metric, since the whole PET bottle system is metric. The fit it very loose and truncated by design, for easy venting if nothing else, so anything close should do. All you want is for the screw action to press the tip of the bottle neck into the cap gasket.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
What he said. Except I skip the ice. 18 yr. Glenfiddich. Or Glenlivet, Glenmorangie...
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Peter T. Keillor III
Yup. It could be 3 mm. The 8 TPI caps seem to work OK though. They only screw on about 1-1/2 turns before the washer engages the lip, maybe another 1/4 turn to compress the fairly thick washer.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Add the CO2 money to the Scotch budget and buy some decent Scotch. Single malts are nice. Mortlach is a nice one that isn't too pricey.
My hard licour rule is, "If it's worth drinking, it's worth drinking neat." Scotch and rum at room temperature. Vodka and good Danish snaps should spend some freezer time before serving. :-)
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
While I thoroughly enjoy a good scotch, my favourite drink is rum and coke except skip the coke and hold the ice. :-)
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Hard to argue with that! The only thing I'd do to improve on that advice is to splash a little water over it as well. I like my scotch a little weaker, so I can sip it longer and enjoy the flavor that everyone says is an acquired taste. Guess so, but if so, I acquired mine the very first time Dr. Tedrow handed me a glass of scotch and water. Loved it immediately.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Quit it, will ya? Sigh!! I used to enjoy it that way, too, but a bleeding ulcer will cure you of all kinds of things. I now take mine with water and lots of ice, enjoying the flavor and not taunting the old ulcer condition, something that seems to have a terrific memory. It still hasn't forgiven me.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
This is a common homebrewing item these days, if you want to save yourself the time (yeah, yeah, I know, its a budget thing!) you can buy them at any well stocked homebrewing supply store. It is a *great* way to share 2L of your latest batch with a friend who doesn't have a Co2 system at home, and you don't want to bother with bottling.
Example:
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-D
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Reply to
Dan

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