Small fuses? Mastech HY3005

I have a Mastech HY3005 power supply (ex military). It's kind of cute. does both constant voltage and constant current and could be
used for plating, etc.
It seems to be fine, except that it is missing a fuse. I tried puching in a regular Buss fuse and it would not fit. I think that it uses some smaller fuses, not sure what kind.
So... What are those fuses that are slightly smaller than regular little Buss fuses sold at Ace hardware etc.
thanks
i
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3/8 inch ?
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meant 5/8 inch
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Let's say that I go to some store or try to look up those fuses on the web, what should I ask for? "Do you have 5/8" fuses"?
The power supply seems to work if I insert a nail in the fuse opening, but, obviously, it is not a good practice to use it that way.
i
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On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 16:59:45 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm,

Call Mouser and ask them or look them up online, Ig. http://www.mouser.com /
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Heart Attacks: God's revenge for eating his little animal friends -- http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development --
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Thanks Larry. Some people suggested to try 5x20mm fuses, I bought some at the nearby RadioShack, and will give that a shot today. This power supply could be good to do some plating.
i
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There is a 5 x 20mm variety. Radio Shack sells them if you can't find them anywhere else.
Best Regards, Keith Marshall snipped-for-privacy@progressivelogic.com
"I'm not grown up enough to be so old!"

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On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 16:42:07 GMT, Keith Marshall

Sounds about right, I will try to check out RS. Thanks.
i
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@NOSPAM.4546.invalid says...

There are also 5x25 & 5x30mm fuses. Not as common as 5x20mm, but check to make sure before you go shopping. If you have trouble finding them locally and/or aren't in a hurry, email me the amperage and if I have them I'll stick a few in an envelope. I used to use a lot of 5x25mm in control panels in modular fuse holders, but these days I can buy circuit breakers for only a few dollars more than the fuse holders.
Ned Simmons
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Thank you Ned. I already went and bought 5x20mm fuses at a nearby RadioShack. I will try them tonight.
i
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On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 16:29:02 GMT, Ignoramus4546

Chinese ex-military? (Mastech is Chinese!)
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wrote:

Yep, I can post pictures of this power supply with military stickers. I am surprised myself. I got it in a big pallet pile of power supplies (not the one with the huge 100A power supplies, but a different one).
i
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Ignoramus4546 wrote:

old number was probably an 8AG unless they were the foreign type.
John
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We used to call those 8AG (back when AGC-3 was 3AG). I don't know the current nomenclature.
Ignoramus4546 wrote:

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Thanks to all. I really needed 5x20 fuses. The ones I got yesterday were wrong size, but the power supply shows healthy signs of life.
i

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On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 17:22:20 GMT, Ignoramus26498

If it is prone to blowing, you can always outboard a 3AG inline fuse holder in its place. Hard to beat the price of 3AG fuses...
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If it keeps blowing, I will get the voltage and current meter out of the supply and toss it to garbage. I bought 2a fuses and I learned that I need 6a fuses (the 2a one lasted for a few minutes of messing around). I already bought the 6a fuses and will try them tomorrow, as today someone is going to visit me.
Does anyone own a similar power supply? I could not properly switch it to constant current mode.
i
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On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 20:27:59 GMT, Ignoramus26498

There is no switch.
Set the voltage to the maximum that is acceptable for your application. Turn the current knob all the way CCW. Then turn off the supply and connect the load. When you turn the supply back on, advance the current knob until current reaches the desired level.
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wrote:

Thanks Don. Worked great, with a resistor. I set current with the resistor in the circuit, then shorted outputs, and the current did not change but voltage dropped to almost zero.
So, I think, this supply is quite suitable for tasks such as plating small objects.
I appreciate your advice, it helped.
i
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On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 05:28:28 GMT, Ignoramus26498

Da nada.
Yes, that supply should work nicely for plating and anodizing small objects. Matter of fact, Caswell Plating sells Mastech supplies for that use. The integral meters are a nice feature. I don't know how well the Mastech supplies regulate current, but plating and anodizing aren't that fussy.
Constant current is definitely the way to go because current is the relevant parameter in these processes. Figure your surface area, dial in the appropriate current, look at your watch and go do something else while things progress.
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