The Maytag Man came by again

Motor bearing (or bushing?) got noisy about 4 months ago and was replaced under warranty. It's doing it again and another new motor (made in China)
is on the way. This dishwasher is only 10 months old, not only do I expect better utility from the thing, I'm pissed because I just sprung for the 3 year extended warranty ($140) and I never buy extended warranties. The repair guy said he wouldn't know what to buy nowadays as it's all crap. Brian, in Cedar
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Brian Barnson wrote:

Just be glad you didn't buy an early Neptune washer.
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I have an older Neptune. What is the problem with them? Mine has been repaired once. Is there an ongoing problem.
Barry

replaced
China)
expect
3
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BP wrote:

Shorted wax motor blew out $300 control board, had to install "mold kit" to prevent moldy smell.
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the shorting wax motor is a well known problem, I called maytag and then send me the mold kit, a new computer with a different program that changes the wash cycles slightly, and a new wax motor, all no charge. And the "blown" $300 circiut board is trivial to repair, you need to replace a 5 cent resistor and a 15 cent triac. I don't see this as a serious problem.

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On Fri, 28 May 2004 05:56:52 GMT, "william_b_noble"

Perhaps not to a techie, but to Mrs. Neptune Owner, it would be a real nightmare, especially after having paid over a GRAND for the bloody thing.
- Yea, though I walk through the valley of Minwax, I shall stain no Cherry. http://diversify.com
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Larry Jaques wrote:

That's the point. And as I said in an earlier post, it took me a whole Saturday to reduce the problem down to a resistor and triac, after which I posted the solution to an appliance forum, which is why it is now not a serious problem to some of us.
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NONSENSE - Maytag offered to send a repairman to replace the computer, the door liner, the seal, and everything, FOR FREE. I chose to do it myself because it's easier for me (I don't have to wait around) - I don't see how you could ask for more - there were some flaws in the first design, they were repaired, and the repair kit including installation was offered FREE to the buyers of the early version. What more would you want Maytag to do?
The washer is well designed, and so far, quite reliable, once the upgrade was installed.
by the way, if you need a computer board for the Neptune, I have my old one, repaired and working (I fixed it while waiting for the kit, and used it) - make me a fair offer and it's yours
stated wide-eyed, with arms akimbo:

then
changes
problem.
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william_b_noble wrote:

I would want Maytag to do what they offered to you. Fix it for free. Like I said, I was quoted $300 for a new control board. I was also quoted $60 for a new door lock when it was repairable with just a $11 wax motor. I was not given the option to have it replaced free. I was not informed of the mold kit until I started digging around on the internet. I installed the mold kit myself because I could not wait around for the repairman.
The issue here is buying the most expensive consumer washing machine available, based on the Maytag name reputation, and finding that it had 2 correctable design defects, one of which Maytag was unwilling to correct at their expense.
You are free to believe anything you like about your washer. I am too. I was disappointed with both the reliability and the support and a quick google search will show that I'm not the only one.
Calling my post nonesense was uncalled for.

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what I meant to call nonsense was the "ms maytag owner" part - your disappointment is real enough, I wasn't happy at the time either. And, I went out on the great wide internet, found the appliance repair discussion list for neptunes, read up on wax motor problems etc. you are right that I shouldn't have had to do that, nor should you, but the company did the right thing in the end. That's far more than you get from many companies. And, the wax motor was available from a nearby maytag place for about the price you paid - it might have been $12, I don't remember - So, no, I don't feel cheated or abused. And yes, I still have a maytag dryer and washer from the early 60s sitting here that works perfectly, should I ever need to switch back.
stated wide-eyed, with arms akimbo:

the
5
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Living in a cave makes me unfamiliar with the term "wax motor". Maybe a little explanation here?? Ken.
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Ken Sterling wrote:

Imagine a cylinder closed on one end, half full of wax and the rest of the volume taken up by a moveable piston. Heat the cylinder with an electric heating element and the wax expands, driving the piston further out of the cylinder.
That piston extending is what locks the door during a spin cycle.
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Sounds like a rube goldburg design. Why not use a solenoid?

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Charles A. Sherwood wrote:

Gee, that was my very first thought when I figured out what a wax motor was.
Nonetheless, solenoids have their drawbacks as well. They need lots of power for lots of force, and they generate a huge back emf pulse when they are turned off. The wax motor can exert a large force but the power needed to do it is integrated over a long time so there's no big surge.
It seems that wax motors are used a lot in space craft for opening doors and moving levers. They work well in vacuum and their power requirements are well suited to the job.

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Okay, I understand the operation, and the application, but I don't necessarily agree that this would be the best engineered solution. I have a tendancy to agree about using a solenoid. To simply throw a lock pin to keep a door from opening could use a very *small* solenoid with a small pin, and I would imagine the "drawbacks" of using a solenoid would disappear. I don't know how quick acting the wax motor is, but the solenoid would be almost instant. A small solenoid probably would do the job, at a lot cheaper price, to keep the price of the entire unit lower. It sounds like the circuit in your car to make the dome light slowly dim until it's out - totally unnecessary as a regular ol' switch for off & on would do the same job at a lot less money, but then you wouldn't be paying $40K for your car. What ever happened to the "simple" rule. Are these young kid engineers designing this junk so use to playing video games that they just have to throw in all this extra stuff because they have nothing else to do? Ken.
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Ken Sterling wrote:

If you could see the wax motor and driver triac, I think you'd agree that it's a cheaper solution than a solenoid and driver. Not better, mind you, but cheaper.
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there are a couple of reasons for using a wax motor: 1. it's a thermal device - it will not release immediately upon power failure - that provides added safety in a consumer appliance. 2. as pointed out by others, a simpler driver can be used (also, much less power) 3. delayed operation is a safety feature also in this case. 4. once the bad thermistors are removed (that were blowing the traics), it's a very reliable device - probably more so than a solenoid. 5. it's cheaper than a solenoid (no copper coil)
I believe the dominant design consideration is #1

SNIP
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Thanks for asking I was wondering too. Its like a waxstat unit in a car thermostat with a heater added. Clever.
Ken Sterling wrote:

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expect
Maytag washing machines used to have a very good reputation. Many years ago Vance Packard in his book 'The Wastemakers' mentioned them as an example of a consumer item that was designed to last.
Leon
--
Leon Heller, G1HSM
http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
  Click to see the full signature.
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replaced
China)
3
ago
of
My 20 year old MT washer was the easiest thing to work on. 2 belts and everything a separate component. Had a pressed steel pulley go bad so just stuck a cast one on. 10 minute repair. The water pump was just as accessible. The tranny was leaking fluid as evident by the streak on the wall, but was still running fine when we donated it. Not sure if they're still using that 'newer' simplified transmission that only used 2 gears. Saw it on a demo machine and since the gears were that nyloplastic I wondered how long they'd last.
Joel. phx

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