Tom Gardner Runs Ohio Bush Into The Ground

I know what you mean. The answer is: Practice! I think that's why I like to argue so much. To think of it, all my good friends are "sparing partners" and they have the same affliction. Another mechanism I use is to write stories, ones that no one will read but help me verbalize a situation or event. I dream of writing Science Fiction but haven't been able to mentally create an interesting situation.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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If you pay attention, Jon, you'll note that the things that keep get you upset and lashing out are your own words, tossed back at you.
Think about it and try chilling out, before trying to boost your ego by putting others down. Your little friends have archived enough to keep you lashing for a year. But if you stopped putting people down, they'd just fade away.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Is this the "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" "Please Donate Now" Wiki? I guess it is.
Eureka!
Sing along now, folks: "Welllllllllllll, I'd rather have a frontal lobotomy, than to have a bottle in front of me..."
Why does your statement end in a question mark, sir? ;)
No TV hookup here. (I'll have been free of it for a decade in a few months!) Is it available thru streaming? Hymie Rickover?
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Which one is it? Point and shoot me.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Botton line is that you have no idea what Tom was trying to influence, Jon. But no matter what, you're determined to be a prick about it, because that's what's happened to your personality after years of failure, bipolar troubles, emotional distress and the inability to get anything going for yourself except for a free forum for "industry leaders" to promote their products. They're using you for a doormat.
You bettcha, Jon!
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Or, they might just be people that worked harder, lived more frugally, invested better, stayed married and generally don't waste money on high status material possessions.
You might want to rethink your stereotype. Your not goiung to know who most of the millionaires are.
" PORTRAIT Of A MILLIONAIRE
Who is the prototypical American millionaire? What would he tell you about himself?(*)
*
I am a fifty-seven-year-old male, married with three children. About 70 percent of us earn 80 percent or more of our household's income.
* About one in five of us is retired. About two-thirds of us who are working are self-employed. Interestingly, self-employed people make up less than 20 percent of the workers in America but account for two-thirds of the millionaires. Also, three out of four of us who are self-employed consider ourselves to be entrepreneurs. Most of the others are self-employed professionals, such as doctors and accountants.
*
Many of the types of businesses we are in could be classified as dull/normal. We are welding contractors, auctioneers, rice farmers, owners of mobile-home parks, pest controllers, coin and stamp dealers, and paving contractors.
* About half of our wives do not work outside the home. The number-one occupation for those wives who do work is teacher.
*
Our household's total annual realized (taxable) income is $131,000 (median, or 50th percentile), while our average income is $247,000. Note that those of us who have incomes in the $500,000 to $999,999 category (8 percent) and the $1 million or more category (5 percent) skew the average upward.
* We have an average household net worth of $3.7 million. Of course, some of our cohorts have accumulated much more. Nearly 6 percent have a net worth of over $10 million. Again, these people skew our average upward. The typical (median, or 50th percentile) millionaire household has a net worth of $1.6 million.
*
On average, our total annual realized income is less than 7 percent of our wealth. In other words, we live on less than 7 percent of our wealth.
* Most of us (97 percent) are homeowners. We live in homes currently valued at an average of $320,000. About half of us have occupied the same home for more than twenty years. Thus, we have enjoyed significant increases in the value of our homes.
*
Most of us have never felt at a disadvantage because we did not receive any inheritance. About 80 percent of us are first-generation affluent.
* We live well below our means. We wear inexpensive suits and drive American-made cars. Only a minority of us drive the current-model-year automobile. Only a minority ever lease our motor vehicles.
*
Most of our wives are planners and meticulous budgeters. In fact, only 18 percent of us disagreed with the statement "Charity begins at home." Most of us will tell you that our wives are a lot more conservative with money than we are.
* We have a "go-to-hell fund." In other words, we have accumulated enough wealth to live without working for ten or more years. Thus, those of us with a net worth of $1.6 million could live comfortably for more than twelve years. Actually, we could live longer than that, since we save at least 15 percent of our earned income.
*
We have more than six and one-half times the level of wealth of our nonmillionaire neighbors, but, in our neighborhood, these nonmillionaires outnumber us better than three to one. Could it be that they have chosen to trade wealth for acquiring high-status material possessions?
* As a group, we are fairly well educated. Only about one in five are not college graduates. Many of us hold advanced degrees. Eighteen percent have master's degrees, 8 percent law degrees, 6 percent medical degrees, and 6 percent Ph.D.s.
*
Only 17 percent of us or our spouses ever attended a private elementary or private high school. But 55 percent of our children are currently attending or have attended private schools.
* As a group, we believe that education is extremely important for ourselves, our children, and our grandchildren. We spend heavily for the educations of our offspring.
*
About two-thirds of us work between forty-five and fifty-five hours per week.
* We are fastidious investors. On average, we invest nearly 20 percent of our household realized income each year. Most of us invest at least 15 percent. Seventy-nine percent of us have at least one account with a brokerage company. But we make our own investment decisions.
*
We hold nearly 20 percent of our household's wealth in transaction securities such as publicly traded stocks and mutual funds. But we rarely sell our equity investments. We hold even more in our pension plans. On average, 21 percent of our household's wealth is in our private businesses.
* As a group, we feel that our daughters are financially handicapped in comparison to our sons. Men seem to make much more money even within the same occupational categories. That is why most of us would not hesitate to share some of our wealth with our daughters. Our sons, and men in general, have the deck of economic cards stacked in their favor. They should not need subsidies from their parents.
*
I am a tightwad. That's one of the main reasons I completed a long questionnaire for a crispy $1 bill. Why else would I spend two or three hours being personally interviewed by these authors? They paid me $100, $200, or $250. Oh, they made me another offer--to donate in my name the money I earned for my interview to my favorite charity. But I told them, "I am my favorite charity."
Quoted from "The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of American's Wealthy"
When he says he didn't get rich, even the median millionaire household with $1.6 million, say with 1 million invested, earning (with a big stretch these days) 6%. That's only $60,000 a year. They don't consider themselves rich. Also, they worked 30 years for that stash, they aren't going to go out and live like they have $100 million, in fact they probably don't want to touch the principal of there investments.
I'd be fairly comfortable on $60,000. :-)
Mikek
Reply to
amdx
As I pointed out in a recent post, if you have a million in free cash to invested you would be very lucky to get $60,000 a year. That doesn't make you rich.
Reply to
amdx

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