What is it? Set 468

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2719 Tender for a miniature train. The pictures seem a little dark this week. Maybe it's my eyes.
Reply to
G. Ross
Posting from my desktop PC, as always.
2719, too dark to get much an idea what we're seeing. 2720, broken porcelean from a spark plug. 2721, too dark to see. 2722, no clue. From the picture of the old vehicle in the background, something vehicle related? Acetylene gas generator? 2723, no clue. 2724, pictures too dark to see well. Maybe a bottle corker.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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I need some help with the last one in this set:
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Rob
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
2722 -- Martian Big Four crystal radio from about 1923. I can't conceive why they made it like that, but they did. Frequently appears on e-bay. The Martian Special shown on the page below seems far less common.
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Northe
Reply to
Northe
I lightened up the first, third and last photos, I guess my monitor settings are different from most, they looked ok on my screen. Thanks for the feedback.
Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
My guess on 2724 is that it's a reloading tool, looks like a shell would fit into the top part, no idea what the fork at the bottom is for.
Reply to
Rob H.
Used to press the primer out? The fork allows the primer to go through?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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My guess on 2724 is that it's a reloading tool, looks like a shell would fit into the top part, no idea what the fork at the bottom is for.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
2720: ceramic insulator of a now-damaged sparkplug
2721: no idea
2722: an early radio (sparkgap transmitter? crystal receiver?)
2723: some kind of hole cutter; start with a pilot hole, this scores a large-radius circle with two hardened cutterwheels
2724: there's a piston missing, I'm thinking this is a rivet press, like for staking the rivets in Levi's jeans. Or, rhinestones, or snaps.
Reply to
whit3rd
I think 2724 is a press for covering buttons for upholstery and clothing. Sans the form and die.
Reply to
aasberry
Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2719) Perhaps a coin box for some kind of transportation setup, like a horse-drawn trolley perhaps?
2720) A screw-on insulator of some sort -- perhaps old post and stud house wiring, or perhaps telephone wiring from the telephone pole.
2721) It looks like the top of a fence post -- with holes to allow two rail fences to meet at right angles. And perhaps specifically for horses with riders to jump over, before they started making them with rails which were easy to knock off.
Perhaps sawn off to use as a guide in making a replacement corner fence post.
2722) It sort of looks like a holder for a galena crystal and a catwhisker (in the ball-socketed arm above) for a crystal radio.
Is there a coil wound around the barrel? Too late at night for me to take time to save an image and brighten it up.
Or perhaps there is a coil inside it, given the springs to make it easy to take apart.
2723) A tool for making round holes in thin sheet metal. You drill a hole to pass the screw, select the right size backing plate to go on the other side, tighten the nut, and then turn the upper part with a wrench and tighten the nut as the rollers force a groove into the metal.
2724) Perhaps a tool for loading wads and shot into a shotshell and crimping it closed.
Also -- with additional parts -- for pushing out the spent primer.
Time to go to bed. I'll read the other suggestions tomorrow sometime. A busy day today.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
2721: I don't know how they wired temporarily in the knob-and-tube days. To provide power for a construction crew, this could have kept two circuits from touching where they crossed. Ceramic insulators may or may not have been put through the four holes. On each side of the block, you might put a spacer to keep the two conductors in a circuit farther apart. You'd thread the conductors through the block and spacers, hoist it up where workers wouldn't hit it accidentally, and pull the conductors tight.
Reply to
j Burns
It isn't for holding conductors, this would be a difficult one to guess, but long pieces of wood (possibly bamboo) were held by this item.
Reply to
Rob H.
------------------------------------------------------ "Rob H." wrote:
---------------------------------------------------- The Greenlee "Radio chassis punch" marked a significant advance when it came to punching large holes in sheet metal.
Lew
Reply to
Lew Hodgett

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