Excel die filer


I found a die filer at an auction today. I wasn't entirely sure what it was but
it didn't
look quite right for a jigsaw. A bit of googling confirms I was right, and that
it's
probably similar to one that made it's way from John to Tony to Tim to Charles
and
who knows where next ?
So ..
Charles, did you find any more information ? A source of files ? Another owner ?
(I think mine spent a few years in a shed in Biddenham, Bedford before it's owner
died or sold up .. so it's probably not the same actual machine).
-adrian

Reply to
Adrian Godwin
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but it didn't
Wish I could find one , not that I need one ,they are just one of those desirables that I desire. I'd Like a small shaper too. Probably will build one like the Harold Hall model in the last few issues of MEW magazine.
Reply to
Kevin(Bluey)
(I think mine spent a few years in a shed in Biddenham, Bedford before it's owner
So the original owner of the Die filer Died
Alan
Reply to
jackary
but it didn't
used to have a die filer at a previous employer, never did use it to file dies but it was very handy for filing stuff to shape. However its greatest use was for shaking aerosols of paint - we used to gaffa tape the can to the arm of the machine and leave it to shake and mix the paint for a couple of minutes - absolutley perfect for the job!
regards
Dudley
Reply to
Dudley Simons
was but it didn't
t, and that it's
Adrian
For files you're own your own - grind the tang down on a normal file and make it fit.
Info wise I found a manual for a larger Excel and a manual for a very similar Amercian made machine. I'll look them out later and send them over if you email me your current address
Charles
Reply to
Charles
was but it didn't
t, and that it's
Adrian
For files you're own your own - grind the tang down on a normal file and make it fit.
Info wise I found a manual for a larger Excel and a manual for a very similar Amercian made machine. I'll look them out later and send them over if you email me your current address
Charles
Reply to
Charles
I've found the Excel No4 manual, but I'd certainly be interested in the American one - there seem to be a couple badged, one's called the Butterfly.
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Address is in email.
-adrian
Reply to
Adrian Godwin
I'll know where to go when I need some workshop space then !
I had the same thought - I wasn't looking for one but saw it there and thought I'd regret it if I didn't pick it up (especially as it was listed as a fretsaw ..). Later, I realised it was just the thing as I've been intendeing to try making some punch tooling.
-adrian
Reply to
Adrian Godwin
I just picked up a filer - but there's not much info out there. It's listed in places as a 'sawing and filing machine' for medical equipment.
Reply to
Pete
There is a casting kit available from Martin Model in the US for the Hartford designed one.
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and then there is the MLA one.
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But unfortunately neither have any top support for the file.
Reply to
Kevin(Bluey)
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The smaller table top Excel die filer has an optional over arm with an upwards pulling spring that allows you to mount fretsaw blades, so to describe it as a fret saw doesn't stretch the truth too far!
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Andrew Maws>
Yes, that's the one I've got, complete with the arm. Charles' literature identified it as a size 0.
The spring arrangement seems a reasonable compromise for saws / small files without going to the complexity of a full powered support, and leaving it very easy to use single-ended if preferred. It would probably be possible to add a similar feature to the sets Kevin has pointed out. It has a stout cast arm, a dovetail slide for the support, and a long spring that's compressed into a pocket in the arm when the side is at the lowest point of travel. The arm can either be removed completely or merely swung out of the way.
The only problem I have with it is the motor, which seems to have the fan blade touching the fish paper in the windings. To fix this I need to :
Remove the endcaps - it's the type with a central band of laminated steel and pressed steel endcaps with bolts going from end to end. I can remove the bolts and slighty shift the endcaps. How can I get them right off without mangling them ?
Remove the pulley - it's rusted onto the shaft, and light hitting hasn't shifted it. I know from bitter experience that a gear puller is likely to break the flanges. I shall probably heat it but am not sure how hot I can get it without damaging the motor.
-adrian
Reply to
Adrian Godwin
Problem solved - it wasn't fixed as firmly as I thought.
-adrian
Reply to
Adrian Godwin
laminated
I had one a few years ago, and the only re-work I had to do was to make a replacement bronze sliding shoe that gives the up/down motion - it had worn 'orribly oval! It had to be disposed of in a down sizing, but I recently acquired a replacement now I've been able to upsize again - it's still in the cardboard box awaiting bench space!
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson

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