Havn't seen anything like this for a while....

Back in the 60's, market stalls sold cheap far eastern tools that were useless, but these days in my experience most Far East stuff is adequate. To
make up my last Screwfix order they had a cheap toolbox with some basic tools on offer (to be left somewhere which isn't particularly secure, so I didn't want good stuff). Most of them are fine particularly for the price, but today I used the junior hacksaw, and after about six strokes on a bit of studding it didn't have any teeth left.
On investigation, the blade was dead soft so I wondered charitably if it had missed the heat treatment. No: quench from red heat, and it's still soft, obviously mild steel! So someone is actually making fake junior hacksaw blades, blued to look just like the real thing. I find it quite surprising that there is a market for them.
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were
adequate. To

basic
secure, so I

price,
a bit of

if it had

soft,
hacksaw
surprising
It's probably been case hardened, but the case is too thin - I had some 12" blades like that a few years back. Screwfix are very good with refunds or replacements - give 'em a call.
AWEM
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newshound wrote:

I bought a bow saw that was cheap and Chinese made. Impossible to do a straight cut with it so useless on branches above an inch thick - you start out cutting them across and by the time you're half way through the blade has moved through 90 degrees so you're cutting the branch down it's length. Threw it away and bought a Stanley one for 5 times the price. At least it works. The difference in the blades was very noticeable. The Chinese one was really thin and also not very wide, teeth the back, compared to the Stanley one.
Also had a staple gun that was crap and ended up in the dustbin - made in China.
I've had several disastrous purchases that on subsequent inspection turned out to be Chinese and complete crap. Now I always look at the label before buying anything. I treat "Made in China" as a hazard warning label and never knowingly buy anything Chinese made.
--
David in Normandy.

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I'm wondering what you might actually have bought then
--
geoff

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writes

My impression is that Chinese industry now is sort of comparable to Britain in the height of the Industrial Revolution, except that they have embraced Japanese quality control along the way. In contrast to Hong Kong half a century ago, I think they take a genuine pride in producing good products at keen prices. I mean, they don't *have* to include a spare set of brushes with electric tools, but they almost invariably do. Presumably they expect to get a long and hard life out of them in their domestic market. OK, for the bargain basement stuff they don't spend a lot of time in finishing and I wouldn't buy a cheap cordless drill because the batteries won't last so well. But I have a little two stroke genny and a two inch petrol water pump and they are very well made and have been totally reliable. Like a Velocette, but without the oil leaks.
It's interesting, too, that the West is obviously fighting back in what would once have been a Far East preserve: I recently bought a couple of basic Nokia phones and one was made in Hungary, the other Romania.
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newshound wrote:

A mate of mine works in auto engine development and mentioned that some of the production is done in former eastern Europe as the manual labour is cheaper than robots to do the assembly.
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Maybe when they are building for, or are a subsidiary of, a Japanese company. There's a lot of crap made in China by Chinese companies. The trouble is, some of us are only too willing to buy it.
MBQ
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wrote:

Nah, if it doesn't work, they expect user to dismantle and replace brushes, thereby invalidating the guarantee. No complaints about the stuff I buy from Aldi, at a tenner for a small angle grinder and three years guarantee' If it fails I just ship it back to them and get another. If they really wanted to help, then a spare pair of bevel gears would be much more useful.

I can find plenty of uses for the geared motor from a cordless with knackered batteries. One of them opens and closes a half ton sliding door for me, helped by the worm gearbox from a knackered Belle concrete mixer.

Regards,
David P.
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On Sat, 09 May 2009 22:51:57 +0200, David in Normandy

Generally agree with that sentiment, but we bought a 2-ton folding engine crane this week to change a Discovery V8 engine, and although it was cheap and obviously Chinese, the basics were fine, it does the job and for 139 collected, was significantly cheaper than the same thing sold by Sealey/Clarke/Machine Mart etc.
The main 'improvements' would be nylocs on the M16 pivot bolts and more flat washers on the fasteners, but it is fine 'as is' for the occasional job.
We do have other lifting tackle BTW, but they are all at the house and the Disco is at the factory.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk http://www.oldengine.co.uk
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On Sun, 10 May 2009 07:23:55 +0100, Peter A Forbes wrote:

I don't mind cheap stuff at all if I can see the construction and assess how long it'll last. The problem I find is with the 'complex' stuff, or where you can't see under the covers at the shop - I tend to avoid those like the plague and will rather go with something that has a good reputation. But if I can see how it's built, there are good and bad Chinese products - just as with items closer to home - and so long as physical shops still exist I can go take a look at the item and make a judgement based on that.

But the nice thing is, you can do those upgrades yourself quickly, easily and cheaply, so it's an all-round win. No point paying lots extra for a 'brand' in that particular case.
cheers
Jules
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On Sun, 10 May 2009 13:43:20 -0500, Jules

Yes indeed.
The place we collected it from was full to the (factory unit) ceiling with imported stuff, generators, shot blasting cabinets, and so on. They probably buy by the container load at a pretty good price.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk http://www.oldengine.co.uk
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<perk>
I keep thinking I need a shot blasting cabinet in my life. Was this place cheap, and are you prepared to name them?
--
Nigel

When the only tools you have are an X3 mill, a
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On Sun, 10 May 2009 22:57:00 +0100, Nigel Eaton wrote:

How practical is it to make one?
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On Sun, 10 May 2009 19:43:23 -0500, Jules

I've seen reasonable small work done in a cardboard box with a polythene window!
--
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "There *must* be an easier way!"
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Easy - BTDT
But Nigel's only 15 minutes down the road from me if he needs to use one
I think he's more interested in buying a new toy
--
geoff

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On Mon, 11 May 2009 20:10:39 +0100, geoff wrote:

Hmm. I've got an air compressor on the way, you see... and it might be fun to rig up some sort of shot/grit/sand blasting cabinet :-)
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Is it a hobby compressor or a bit more serious - sandblasting will give it a good workout
Mine is based on a single drainer sink unit in a speaker cabinet
The blast gun came from machine mart, its worth going th extra mile and getting a hardened nozzle
If you're interested I can give you a supplier for glass beads
--
geoff

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geoff wrote:

I'd be interested in a glass bead supplier. Have been meaning to get some, possibly from Machinemart, but if you know a better supplier that would be useful info.
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Machinemart ?
don't be silly - a small tub for a lot of wanga
email me at snipped-for-privacy@cetltd.com

--
geoff

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On Mon, 11 May 2009 22:25:02 +0100, geoff wrote:

Hmm, 30gal tank, 2HP motor and rated at 135psi max - I'm not sure of cfm figures yet. I'm guessing it's more 'small workshop' than 'hobby', but I've no idea if that's enough grunt for blasting....

Urgh, those folks have been spamming me for several years, even though I never bought anything from them (and efforts to tell them to stop worked for a while and then they seemed to find me again) :-(

Afraid I'm on the wrong side of the Pond these days :) Assuming the compressor's up to the job though there are a few engineering places in the nearby town, so I'll ask around and see if I can source from them or find out who their suppliers are...
cheers
Jules
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