Need advice on rebuilding drill press

Hi
I bought this Rexon drill press at a reasonable price but it needs
some serious work - I think it may well be the most abused drill
press in the whole world !! ( but its a stout one so it is worth my
while to rebuild it) Considering the shocking state of the table and
handle section I cant understand how they did not break the elevating
rack !!
The table is full of holes - what can be done ?
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the table spigot is fast on the arm - don't think it was ever
moved - how can I get it loose ?
Can you please offer some advice on how to repair the hole through the
pinion shaft - it is very worn at the one end
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thanks
Tim Nash
South Africa
Reply to
Tim Nash (aka TMN)
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back with a piece of copper, then fill holes with weld, grind to match ( a cup grinder in the chuck works really well for this :.) )
or fill with milliput for a quicker, untidier fix.
3-in-one oil. or heat it up.
weld it closed, rebore or (again) milliput and rebore
or: (since I'm not familiar with this drill) can you just make the hole bigger, and use a bigger pin?
Reply to
bigegg
cover.http://www.workshop-projects.com-> Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
or: (since I'm not familiar with this drill) can you just make the hole bigger, and use a bigger pin?
sorry - I meant to say that is pin that retains the handle on the pinion shaft
Reply to
Tim Nash (aka TMN)
cover.http://www.workshop-projects.com-> > Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
After re-examining the parts I think it was a taper pin that held the handle on the pinion shaft (although the one side is butchered it explains the size difference between the two sides). Don't know if I will get such a pin here.
Tim
Reply to
Tim Nash (aka TMN)
ver.http://www.workshop-projects.com-> > > Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
As far as the table is concerned, welding, if done well, would certainly be the best solution. However, I had good results on a rather less butchered drill table using home-made metal filler. I mixed up some standard two-pack epoxy resin (Araldite), and gradually added clean cast-iron filings until I got a stiff paste. I packed this into the cleaned and thoroughly degreased holes in the table, then faced it off when it had set hard. 5 years later it's still in place and barely noticeable.
HTH Mike
Reply to
mikecb1
Does it taper enough so that if you file the hole smooth (possibly ream out the hole to be circular again), the pin will fit, just further in?
Reply to
bigegg
--Howzabout making a top plate? It could be more versatile and you can customize it for special purposes.
Reply to
steamer
cover.http://www.workshop-projects.com->> Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
Failing a bigger pin, could you not drill and ream a new hole 90deg to the original in at least the shaft, possibly both the shaft and handle? Taper-pin reamers are pretty easy to come by.
Richard
Reply to
Richard
cover.http://www.workshop-projects.com-> >> Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
All things considered I think a top plate is the best option for me.
I hauled out my small taper reamers (imperial - I have never used them, got them as part of complete lathe setup - coincidently from the estate of a gentleman named Tom Gardner who wrote some articles for ME) and the taper matches a 7/32 but the remaer comes out at quite angle, not perpendicular to the shaft.
So I have deiced that I am not going to slavishly try get it back to its original look - I am going to make a new handle assembly and forgo the gruaduated collar ring that would necessitate me using the original hole in the pinion shaft.
PS any body know how to get the pulley (aluminum) off the top of the spindle ? I was wondering if I could knock the whole spindle and pulley up from the bottom through the hole vacated by the quill ?
Tim
Reply to
Tim Nash (aka TMN)
make or buy a gear puller - percussive maintenance tends to break pulleys, especially the edges.
Reply to
bigegg
cover.http://www.workshop-projects.com-> Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
I was really concerned about this part but it turned out to be dead easy - I put my 3 arm puller over the pulley and turned up the tension and used a heat gun to heat the pulley after a few minutes it literly popped up.
Removing the table spigot from its bracket was a cinch (ha ha) - It was so simple - use the cinch bolt in "reverse" to open the bracket a fraction.
It is sometimes good to leave problems stew in your head for a while and not just have at them!
Tim
Reply to
Tim Nash (aka TMN)

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