Re: UV Coating of CAB

Hi:
> There have Cellulose Acetate Butyrate (CAB) sheet from Eastman
> Kodar, however the hardness of surface is not enough only about 2H, as
> well as scrap resistance is not enough. I like to UV coat on the surface
> but fail, because Eastman coated it before sell, I don't know what it
> is, therefore we can do nothing on this surface, I tried to use solvent
> to destory the surface but fail, because too slow is still can not
> production. Plasticizer no work too. Does any one can give me suggestion
> how to treat this surface in order to adhesion UV resin. Thanks > everybody.
Corona or flame treatment are some easy options that should work with
any film.
However, I am worried about how well this will work. If there is
already a coating, that coating does not seem to have good mechanical
properties itself, including adhesion. Any UV coating you add may not
stick well since it is sticking to the Eastman coating, not directly
to the CAB.
You could also try to crosslink the CAB with the coating by using
e-beam or maybe a chemical crosslinking reaction (peoxide maybe?)
John
Reply to
John Spevacek
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leechyun wrote in message ... Hi: There have Cellulose Acetate Butyrate (CAB) sheet from Eastman Kodar, however the hardness of surface is not enough only about 2H, as well as scrap resistance is not enough. I like to UV coat on the surface but fail, because Eastman coated it before sell, I don't know what it is, therefore we can do nothing on this surface, I tried to use solvent to destory the surface but fail, because too slow is still can not production. Plasticizer no work too. Does any one can give me suggestion how to treat this surface in order to adhesion UV resin. Thanks everybody.
Chyun Lee
Are you sure that it is coated? I'm not familiar with CAB sheet, but I've worked with cellulose acetate- and it's often very heavily plasticised. The resulting greasy surface might seem like a coating, and can give problems when trying to apply coatings on top. Which solvent are you using to 'destroy the surface'?
CAB itself should be quite friendly to stick to, as CAB when used as a coating has good adhesion to a number of surfaces.
-- Anton
Reply to
anton
Hi: Thanks for your interesting in my problem, I have two kinds of sample, one has been hard coat the other are not ( Eastman said), Eastman sell only hard coat product on the market, you can never see non hard coat product on the Eastman catalog, due to the business political, this product only sell to the big customer, small company like us, sorry. Two kinds of product have very different surface property, it is a big different you can dip it in methylene chloride about 20 seconds, surface of non hard coat, it looks like glue, because CAB solute and swell, it is very easy to wet of UV resin, but hard coat sample, after 20 seconds it etching the surface only, looks like "mountain hill", you can use nail to scrap, it still hard. Therefore UV resin can not adhesive because leave in the surface is inactive, as well as surface is not flat. You can easily coating on CAB which surface is not hard coat, There is no worth to discuss here. High shool boy can do it after I teached. It is easy. I can understand there are much plasticiser in the CAB however I tried UV coated on soft PVC before, it still can adhesive and has elastic, as you know there are much plasticiser in soft PVC, the principle is some component of recipe can "eat"plasticiser, it is not a big problem. I tried to find one solvent or plasticiser which can swell curing parts of CAB quick, I used methylene chloride, MEK, acetone, ethyl acetate, n-butyl acetate, DMF, cyclohexanone, THF, toluene, DOP, DBP, triphenyl phosphate as plasticiser, most of solvent can solute CAB of course, but still no work because surface is destory,leave inactive parts. The more difficult the more interested, otherwise no need research,we do nothing,this is what kind of world.
Chyun Lee
Reply to
leechyun

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