I want a pair!

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11501081 /
shockie B)

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I saw a replica of the fat boy at Oshkosh. those are too shiny!
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PMC!
--
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
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On 25 Feb 2006 16:45:49 -0600, kaplow snipped-for-privacy@encompasserve.org.mars (Bob Kaplow) wrote:

I don't think that qualifies. But on a historical note, what was the first missile to be armed with a nuclear warhead, Thor?
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writes:

thought it was the Redstone. atomic warhead with a range of five miles. your opinion?
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On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 22:30:23 -0600, "Tater Schuld"

Corporal was the first "guided" missile authorized to carry an atomic payload...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporal_missile
tah
--
Tod A. Hilty
Hilty Information Systems
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On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 22:30:23 -0600, "Tater Schuld"

My opinion is that all the missiles mentioned in this thread are better modeling subjects than gravity bombs, and in some cases are even good PMC candidates. Redstone had a range of about 180 miles. It was essentially an uprated V2. Thor was more of a clean sheet design IRBM with a range of about 1000 miles, and it later evolved into the Delta.
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<rant>
One of my pet peeves is about the way commentators (including Mr. Jones) wax so eloquently about the "horrors" of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I would remind these folks that dropping the bomb on Japan was perhaps the most humane act in the annals of warfare. These two bombs convinced a nation prepared to fight to the last man, woman, and/or child that they just might want to reconsider.
Mr Jones makes the mistake of thinking that the Japanese of WWII had the same values as we did. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Japanese Bushido code held that the greatest disgrace one could experience was to lose or to be captured in battle. A soldier should kill himself before surrendering, and any soldier (or for that mater, any civilian) who either surrendered or allowed himself to be captured was beneath contempt. (Just ask the folks who survived the Bataan death march.)
On researching the subject of the bombing of Hiroshima, I discovered the diary of a physician who survived the bomb and described the horrible aftermath. (I don't remember the name of the book, something like "Hiroshima Diary.") What I found most astonishing was that, even amid the carnage of a nuclear explosion, this doctor was devestated when the Emperor announced the surrender. How could he disgrace the Japanese people this way? Surely this was a mistake!
Look at it another way. The Japanese were a warlike military power determined to conquer the Pacific and eventually the world and wipe out all the Yankee Dogs they could in the process. Two nukes later, they were pacifists who wanted to sell us cars and electronics, and they are our best buddies in the world.
Condemn the bomb? Thank God for the bomb!
shockwaveriderz wrote:

--
Ad Astra!

Bill Sullivan
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I heard from a teacher in high school that the Japanese were about to surrender but the USA decided to drop the bombs to scare the Russians....
I kind doubt it because after seeming "The Last Samurai" I think most Japanese soldiers would rather kill themselves than surrender in battle.
Imp not sure if Taiwan being liberated from Japan is a good thing, some old generation said that we owe our higher education standards to the Japanese, and they said the KIT messed it up cause of the 228 incident...
-- TAI FU
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Nuclear tragedy? Poor taste?
Would he rather they make models of incendiary bombs? Aircraft carriers? How about that marvel of engineering known as the machine gun.
War is a horror of death and tragedy, the rest is just difference in delivery. The a-bombs were simply efficient at delivering that horror, because make no mistake, in one form or another that horror was coming.
--
Tweak

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Tweak wrote:

Not only that, the Japanese Themselves had a nuclear bomb program. They would not have hesitated to use it on Us. Had we not had the bomb, invasion of Japan itself was our next step and like You said, "in one form of another that horror was coming".
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plus didn't the fire-bombing of Tokyo kill far more civilians than both atomic bombs combined??
message

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Don't go bringing facts like that into the discussion.
--
Tweak

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...and far fewer than the numbers of innocent civilians throughout Asia that were slaughtered directly at the hands of Japan's military.
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