B-10

Respect has to be earned, and the Japanese as a nation and culture have so far not met the requirements for that. Individual Japanese are of course a different matter, and are entitled tot he benefit of doubt like anyone else.

Rob

Reply to
Rob van Riel
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Since I am the guy that opened my big mouth and started all this, I have been most tempted to just keep my keyboard quite with regards to this continuing conversation. But it appears at least some of you share my thoughts;

Mark pretty well said what I had on my mind.

Since a good many of you were born long after the end of the Second Great Hate, I suspect your all -to- apparent prejudices are learned rather than earned. Most of us old farts learned a long time ago that that type of assumed hatred is not particularly useful or healthy.

I am sure that it is convenient to be able to hide behind a cute handle and make all kinds of radical statements, as there usually are no consequences involved. But along with the no consequences, there usually is a big dose of "no attention" and "no credibility".

If you were meeting a mixed group of strangers in a public place, I really doubt if many of you would refer to members of the group with most of the terms you seem to want me to accept as socially acceptable.

Good manners have NOT gone out of style. But they sure have become a good deal more difficult to find.

Norm

Reply to
Norm Filer

Well since I have some Welshmen here I have a question perhaps you can answer. Is there any port in Wales that has locks that take ships up to the harbour? If not now were there any during WWII?

Bill Banaszak, MFE

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

tactics, etc of the military and don't think of the misery that the Japs and the Krauts brought upon the world.>

I usually don't weigh in on crap like this, but... I, for one, think about this rather frequently, basically every time I watch something on the History Channel, or Discovery Wings, concerning the ETO in WWII. I am one of the oddballs who had relatives on both sides in Europe, probably shooting at one another. My grandfather was an officer in the German army, his son, my uncle, was a 109 pilot. My other uncle was in the US Army. USAAF bombs ripped open and crippled the arm of the little girl who would one day become my mother. My brother was born in Germany, I was born here in the States (had I been born on time, I too would have been born there). Ok, so which side do I cheer for and which do I despise? Sure as hell both sides committed various dirty deeds, Germany having the dubious distinction of being overtly genocidal. The U.S., however, was apparently being kind by nuking Nagasaki and Hiroshima into oblivion, turning children into piles of dust? It did, after all, end the war, saving millions of lives, right? We designed, built and used the weapon that would forever change the world; from those days on the entire planet lives in abject fear of it being used again. But we're the good guys. It's time to get over it and move on. Build the models because they, whoever 'they' might be, had interesting equipment and leave the politics out of it. And yes, I put a swastika on the tail of every Luftwaffe plane I build, because it's historically correct, not because I support what it stood for.

When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. --Leonardo Da Vinci EAA # 729686 delete the word spam from email addy

Reply to
TimeTraveler658

Hi Bill, I'm afraid it's not a subject I know much about. I will ask my father next time I see him, it's the sort of thing he might well know, Cheers, Bill.

Reply to
Bill Davies

Bill Banaszak wrote

Not Welsh myself, but I was sent there to do some computer work at Aberthaw power station, which is close to a place called Barry; I never saw them, but my boss claimed there was a lock to get into Barry harbour, and that it was extremely difficult to get into.

There's a plethora of pictures of Barry and its surroundings - all of which make it look nicer than when I was there - at

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Reply to
Rik Shepherd

Thanks, Rik. I'll have to look at it some afternoon as it's taking some time to load. My dad's Liberty Ship came into Wales and he was sure it was Cardiff but I've never heard of locks there. For those who'd like to know the ship was the Susan B. Anthony and she probably looked better than her namesake. ;)

Bill Banaszak, MFE

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

Hi Bill, Barry is geographically very close to Cardiff, so that would make sense, Cheers, Bill.

Reply to
Bill Davies

Where's the monkey on his trike and what's he gonna do to the Wiliam's Bros. kits this time!?!?!

He is going to take the 1/72 C5 retracts and work them into it :-)

Reply to
Charles Ryan

I watched a program the other night about the raid on a Japanese death camp near the end of WWII.

I knew from Japanese exchange students that we had hosted that none of the horrors that Japan visited on the world is discussed in Japanese schools. I did not, however, know that one of the worst murderers went unpunished and was elected to office after the war.

To date Japan has never appoloigized for the Bataan death march, the butchery of Nanking, the treatment of Allied POWs or much else that they did.

Of course. There isn't a thing to be done now, so many years later.

Tom

Reply to
Maiesm72

They still don't talk about unpleasant things. It's a cultural thing I suppose. My niece came back from Japan with a little 'something extra'. Had she mentioned it to the family she was staying with they would have sent her home before her year was up. However, Jared is a cute little guy and I think she loves him dearly.

Bill Banaszak, MFE

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

I for one do not build any IJA/IJN subjects for precisely the reasons stated above, they won't own up to what they did.

Reply to
Ron

But they made beautifull seaplanes...........

Reply to
AM

Both can be satisfied with simple green&white surrender markings painted over the meatballs, and think of USAAF drivers in the pilot seat post-September 1945.

Or some of the ones in full US markings used in tests

Or put French markings on for the craft they used in Vietnam for awhile, same for using Royal Thai paintjobs.

** mike **
Reply to
mike

Also captured and flown in the markings of China, Indonesia, UK, New Zealand, Australia, Manchuoko...

and not a meatball in sight.

Tom

Reply to
Maiesm72

They still do...

Jon.

(Who spent a very nice day at the Iwakuni JMSDF open house watching Shin Meiwa US-1As doing a three ship formation then taking the locals for pleasure flights last summer.)

Reply to
Jonathan Stilwell

I know a guy who married a Japanese girl against her families wishes. They had a child who was handicapped. When they divorced later, the girls father took her back in and she moved back home to Japan, but the family would not let her bring the handicapped half american child to Japan due to the shame involved. So my friend is raising the child without a mother here in the US.

The modern Japanese we see so often projected to us by bus> Maiesm72 wrote:

Reply to
old hoodoo

Maybe hiding? Ask any Korean that's been to Japan and they'll tell you the japanese are the most racist people on earth.

Reply to
Ron

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