Bare metal finish WWII US Navy aircraft

Now that I've got your attention...
I want to build an F4F Wildcat coming off the assembly line just before it was
to be
painted. Bare metal. Maybe just getting a coat of primer on some areas.
#1. Were the aircraft complete builds at this point or missing canopies, guns,
etc?
#2. Dioramawise, would they be sprayed inside the factory in a booth or outside
in the open
air?
#3. Would the surfaces to be painted zinc oxide already be painted before the
exterior paint
scheme was applied?
#4. If I go with a two-tone Navy scheme and wanted to focus my diorama after one
coat had
been applied, which coat went on first? Light to dark?
#5. What color primer would be correct?
#6. Would any panels be removed and the exposed area masked off?
Not looking for answers only from retired Grumman workers here ;-), anyone that
wants to
hazard a guess, suggest an idea or just throw something out there will be
welcomed too. See
where I'm going with this? Anything on how to setup a WWII paintjob dio would be
more than I
have now... which is nada.
This and the F4U-5 Corsair are my next two builds to keep me busy this winter.
WmB
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Reply to
WmB
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What you need are some photos of the assembly lines. My guess is that the subassemblies might have been preprimed, or even completely painted. I suggest this for two reasons--it might be a lot more efficient way to paint at least the primer, and I have seen photos of a Dauntless assembly line where the unmated wings already have full paint and insignias. Grumman's practice might of course have been different.
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert
you might see if you can find this book, "Forge of Freedom". I have it and it has lots of production line pics....
Craig
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Reply to
Craig
20 some years ago, when I was stationed with HC-16 at NAS Pensacola, I would spend some of my weekends helping out the "wrinkle necks" at MNA. (Museum of Naval Aviation). I.e. I cleaned corrosion, anyway, I remember one of the geezers telling me that the reason that why corrosion is such a problem on these was that when they were built, corrosion inhibitors and primers were not used alot, because chances are it would only be in service for a few months or maybe a few years at most.
J
Reply to
Longtailedlizard
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Hey thanks for tha heads up. I'm on it.
WmB
To reply, get the HECK out of there snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Reply to
WmB
OK... I meant places like the green landing gear wells and surfaces that are hidden like the areas where the folding wings join. Spray those first or after the exterior is painted? During sub assy?
WmB
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Reply to
WmB
hidden like the
It seems far more logical to do those before everything is assembled. Otherwise there will be places unreachable. Just my 2¢.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Bill Banaszak
Yeah I know. I clarified my original post just in case somebody was being a wiseguy (prime before paint).
WmB
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Reply to
WmB
In that case interior green before outer paint.
WmB wrote:
wiseguy (prime
Reply to
Ron
I have worked with aerospace parts for years. Almost all machined castings are coated prior to assembly. In fact it may be 100% of the parts. I can not think of a single airplane part that has bare metal exposed when assembled. Most have that yellowish-green flat coating on them.
Jeff
outside in the open
the exterior paint
after one coat had
welcomed too. See
would be more than I
Reply to
Jeff

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