Explanation of this figure set?

I'm guessing its troops talking to someone in England, before the invasion ?
Looks like a fun diversion diorama...maybe suggesting that the man not
fire his shotgun so near the british camps??
Craig
http://www.luckymodel.com/scale.aspx?item_no=MB-3533
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Looks more like some paras on a practice jump got a little lost and were asking the gentleman for directions.
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Musicman59 wrote the following:

http://www.dragonmodelsusa.com/dmlusa/prodd.asp?pid=MAS3533
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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thx for the dragon link. that is what I thought originally as I thought the red phone booths were strictly British. guess not.
Craig
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On what planet would a civilian be walking around like that in Nazi occupied Europe?
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Gray Ghost wrote the following:

The Netherlands, Northern Europe, on Earth.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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reminds me of the scene in Band of Brothers where they cut the wire setting loose the cattle... not knowing where they were..
Craig
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Musicman59 said the following on 03/04/2011 21:50:

Para exercises any time WWII England. Notice proper Harris Tweed jacket, not a cheap import although the shotgun is not 'broken' so not a proper gamekeeper or groundsman. Perhaps he'd just seen Went the Day Well! ;-)
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Musicman59 said the following on 03/04/2011 21:50:

I've just realised that I've seen this before and it's appeared in a couple of films about England and not just in WWII where locals act as scouts or members of the French Resistance and if given the right question, then give directions to their goal.
It's something I did as a teenage Air Cadet with the RAF on exercises around Brize Norton and it gives the proper military something to laugh about.
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Richard Brooks wrote the following:

That makes sense since all the road signs were removed to confuse the Germans if they invaded.
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Bill
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Hi there.
Masterbox made a mistake on the setting of this figure set.
The hunter can be removed from the set and the other three figures used for an Arnhem or vicinity setting.
The hunter is a very nice figure even by itself. His shot gun is in two sections and can be posed opened ready for re-loading or carried ready fro use. There is even a rabbit that can be added to the hunter or posed lying amongst cover.
Other than the misplaced locale of the artwork this is a very nice set of figures. The expression on the officer's face on the styrene officer's figure really shows the frustration. He looks a lot like Sean Connery too.
Cheers from Peter
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Sir Ridesalot wrote:

...the hunter is probably telling the officer to be "vewy vewy quiet".
--
- Rufus

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The hunter just doesn't have a British feel - I don't think we carry shotguns on slings usually, albeit some weapons may have been so equipped for use by the Home Guard/LDV, but I doubt these were still in use by 1943 when more military kit would be available. The headgear also appears more continental, as is carrying extra rounds on a belt rather than in the pockets. As for the availability of shotguns in occupied countries, I suspect as they are such a necessary part of agricultural equipment (and in that era unregulated) they would probably be tolerated, at least in rural contexts. They are obviously leathal, but a single or twin-barrel non-(semi-)automatic is of limited military utility. In the U.K. they certainly remained in the hands of farmers, who were (I believe) given an ammunition allocation. When my father was stationed in Scotland his duties frequently took him out of camp with little accountability for time thus spent, and as a result he was accustomed to supplementing mess rations with local wildlife. He borrowed shotguns from local farmers, and "traded up" their ammo chits by taking shells in less popular shot sizes. In the end he had a shotgun of his own, an ancient weapon he had borrowed and damaged, and had had re-stocked at the expense of owing a few favours to the armourers. When he contritely returned it, the farmer told him he shouldn't have bothered, and as he was so fond of the weapon he should keep it. He hung on to this until they moved to Yorkshire, when his customary activities caused problems. For his roving duties he simply borrowed what transport was available, and on one occasion this was a staff car. Some days later he was summoned to the C.O., who was annoyed that HE had been stigmatised by local society as a poacher... The upshot was he was told to get rid of the shotgun, which was done by trading it for drinks at the local pub. It didn't end his provisioning career, because I recall him telling me when in Europe after D-Day he had a small, short barrelled . 410 folding shotgun designed to be carried in concealment by poachers. This was purely for the wildlife, for last-ditch personal protection he had a small-calibre German Officers pistol, but he was as bad a marksman with a pistol as he was good with long guns. He didn't carry any standard-issue weapons usually, and after loosing a requisitioned truck (and it's driver) to shell fire he "borrowed" a motorcycle which remained his personal transport for much of the rest of the campaign, and aquired a tankers leather-bound helmet for headgear.

Cheers
Moramarth
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