Hawker Hunter Intake Colour Question

I am about to fit the wings onto the Revell 1/72 Hunter F6 and I now
realise that I don't know what colour to paint the inside surfaces of
the air intakes. I need to do this before I fit the wings. Does
anyone know what colour they should be?
I've been slightly disappointed by the fit of the parts in this kit.
Has anyone else encountered problems with this or have I clumsily
misaligned the fuselage halves and caused the problem myself?
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
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They were intake colour. ;-)
I don't know the correct name for it, but it is a very light creamy grey (almost white) that has a sort of silvery tinge.
Also bear in mind that many Hunters were repainted later in life when the intake interior colour became dependant on the undersurface colour of the aircraft. This was certainly the case with 237OCU Hunters in 1983. Those that were overall Light Aircraft Grey had LAG intakes and splitters. Those that were camouflaged overall Dark Green/Dark Sea Grey had DSG intakes and splitters. The lone camouflaged aircraft with LAG undersurfaces had LAG intakes.
When I build a Hunter, I use very light grey if the aircraft has silver undersurfaces and LAG if it has LAG undersurfaces.
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
Enzo,
Wow, that was a quick reply!
Thanks a lot for the information. What would those of us who model the RAF do without your first-hand knowledge?
Despite the dificulty I have in keeping up with aircraft and vehicles, I'm now trying to resist being bitten by the railway bug. I was foolish enough to think that there would be no harm in buying a few cheap second hand books on British locomotives. Now, I'm going back through Airfix Magazine to look at the railway articles. Fortunately, I can't possibly accommodate any kind of layout but the odd static locomotive on a small diorama base is becoming a temptation.
Thanks again for your help with the Hunter and Jaguar colours.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
Oh, you're in for a rough time. When that railway bug bites it never goes entirely away. I try to stay away from new issues of model rail mags as I can feel the disturbance brewing deep in the psyche. I wanna build a layout, I wanna paint locos, I wanna paint rolling stock, I wanna....... No! Down, down, down! There, that's better. Phew!
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller
You're right. I keep building Stanier coaches even though I have more than thirty of them and I will never have a layout large enough to use them all.
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
Bill,
I think you may be right.
For years, I carefully avoided getting interested in ships and railways because I couldn't possibly take on any more subjects. A few years ago, I gave in and began buying books on ships but I've managed to resist the temptation to make ship models although 1/1200 scale periodically beckons. This year, I bought a few small, cheap books on British locomotives. It seemed harmless; I could give them up any time I liked. Now, I keep thinking of country stations with a foot or two of track and a local freight train. It would make a nice diorama. Perhaps a Black Five would be make a good locomotive model on a small base by itself. I wonder if rehab is the answer.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
To have any visual impact it would need to be pretty big, at least 7mm/ft. Alternatively you could create a small diorama with perhaps a water tower in the background?
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Black Fives... might as well be Black Holes.
Stay away from the event horizon. (Don't even consider looking at the Caprotti builds.)
Not gonna help...
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
For some reason, I find this difficult to interpret.
At the moment, I've been sidetracked into reading about the NER and LNER as I live in the middle of its territory. Fortunately, the local library has a number of Ken Hoole's books which are a good starting point. The early electrification and the steam railcars are interesting.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
"Electrification" - the magic word! I live along the electrified line of the old PRR between Harrisburg and Philaldelphia, Pa. I've seen GG-1s, P5s, E44s, E33s and E60s working through here. I sure miss the big Gs.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
I have to be honest and admit that I don't know what any of these locomotives are. Nevertheless, they sound impressive. What was a Big G? If you have any pictures, I'd be interested to see them and I'm sure that I wouldn't be the only one.
The NER electrification was a local system using single electric cars and multiple units for passengers and a couple of odd locomotives for freight. It was set up in the early 1900's but lasted long enough for me to go on family holidays in its later trains in the 1950's.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
You're probably right but I don't see myself making any railway models for a while. I started the year determined to avoid a repetition of last year when I finished only one model. So far, I've started several and finished none. Work makes too many demands on my time and energy. Even so, a Sentinel railcar or even a Y1 or Y3 shunter would make an interesting change.
What do you use to pull your Stanier coaches?
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
what's the model on those ge evo's? are they common? history channel had a show on frieghts as part of the train series and it showed the assembly line. they move those monsters by pushing them on an air cushion. damn.....
Reply to
someone
Hmm, where would you like them? I've got lots of pics that I saved off alt.binaries.pictures.rail plus some of my own that I've scanned. The GG1s were articulated streamlined motors that were in service from 1935 to 1981. Their wheel arrangement was 4-6+6-4. P5s were both boxcabs and semi-streamlined and rode a 4-6-4 wheel arrangement. They pre-dated the GG1s by a couple of years. The E33 was originally built for the Virginian Railroad which was a coal-hauler in Virginia and West Virginia. The line was merged into the Norfolk & Western who didn't need the electrics. The E33s were sold off to the New Haven and eventually found their way into the Penn Central, finishing their careers in Conrail blue. Out of the 12 built only one survives, home again in Virginia. They ran on C-C trucks/bogeys. 66 E44s were built and they ran on C-C trucks/bogeys also. Their design was very linear and very like a diesel roadswitcher. I have very sharp memories of seeing a pair pulling a TrucTrain (intermodal trailers) after a powdery snowfall with the snow blowing away from the passing train. E60s were designed and built for Amtrak, our national passenger service. They were supposed to replace the GG1s that Amtrak had but they had their share and more of tracking problems. C-C trucked, they were also dual cabbed and very like a silver brick in shape. At one time there was some use of the AE6 here and it was based on the Swedish Rc-4. Lately the electrics haven't been through here as much. Most passenger movement is by the new diesels. I can't recall their proper designation but I call them 'Blunt Bullets'. :)
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
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The NER electrification was a local system using single electric cars
Reply to
willshak
Beats me. Maybe those are the diesels I was talking about. How long have they been building them?
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
e:
Bill,
I can't get pictures on the alt.binaries groups despite a change of ISP some time ago. Otherwise, I should think any photo storage site, like Photobucket, would do the trick. I've had a look at the site suggested by Wilshak and the machines certainly look impressive.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
NORTHDUK
Back in the day 2 GG1s would haul 100+ freight cars through here regularly. Strangely, for all the size of the things the cabin was very cramped. I couldn't stand upright in one and I'm 6 ft. tall.
I'll see what I can do about putting some pics up on Photobucket and let you know when I have them there.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller

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