Hyper-threading technology

Hi Does anyone know how Solidworks react on Intels Hyper-threading technology. Will SolidWorks see it as one or two processors?
Kind regards
Klaus Sabroe
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snipped-for-privacy@tresu.dk (Klaus Sabroe) wrote in

SW can only see one processor at a time anyway. Photoworks can use multiple processors, and could theoretically use a HT processor as two processors. I have no experience with this, so someone else will have to volunteer whether or not it's worth the trouble.
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We tested with PhotoWorks. Disabling the hyper-threading improved rendering time dramatically - 40 minutes, down from 60 minutes, on our test assembly.

multiple
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I posted this here some time ago (thread was "more RAM or Dual Processor")

Code written for multiple processors automatically takes advantage of hyper-threading. Further optimizations are possible, but will mostly be done by compilers, or by using optimized libraries (see http://www.intel.com/cd/ids/developer/asmo-na/eng/technologies/threading/index.htm )
However, you should realize that hyper-threading basically optimises the use of the cpu by speeding-up thread switching, but you still have 1 processor to do the math. So you can expect your system to be more responsive when loaded, but hyper-threading probably won't speed-up your SW rebuilds...
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Philippe Guglielmetti - www.dynabits.com



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HT with 1 cpu is actually slower using SW. I do not see where it helps with PW2 either.
The nice thing about HT is with multiple apps running smoother but not really faster. (example running audio, video apps and SW at the same time, no noticeable interruptions in audio/video... turn HT off, you will see and hear interruptions.)
So, if you have (2+) SolidWorks open, yes, HT does help but that's relative to what you are doing but it does not speed up SW.
The real advantage of HT is when you have 2 or more cpu's (= ~4 cpu's).
Anyhow, it's a easy test. Reboot, turn HT off in your bios and test the difference.
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Klaus Sabroe wrote:

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Hi
Thank you for your response. I did not think that HT would give me any performance improvements but I am not sure wheather the Windows will se it as one or two processors as it is one physically, so I wanted to ask. Actually I am having trouble finding the best Intel processor without Hyper-Threading. I have been looking at Intels homepage and I do not think it is clear.
Kind regards and have a nice weekend
Klaus
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Klaus,
With HT on, windows does see it as virtually 2 cpu's. Not sure what non-HT cpu's are remaining they exist and the vendor will know enough which does not have HT?
Otherwise, nothing really wrong with HT and you can turn it off.
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Klaus Sabroe wrote:

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Hi,
I tried solidworks with hyper-threading and solidworks doesn't work well. If you need power it's not the good way. In fact it's slower with hyper-threading... In the task manager I can see two windows during a solidwork session (like two processors). Each pseudo-processor have 50% of the job....but if I want to open a big file or if I want to make a sldwg, solidwork shutdown quickly without warnig and you lost everything.
Yours truly
Yves Rossignol ing. (engineer)

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If
nothing surprising here. see below

you should report this to SW support.
You definitely have to understand what hyperthreading is, and how different it is from dual procs. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyper-threading and especially note: "Hyper-Threading works by duplicating certain sections of the processor -those that store the architectural state -but not duplicating the main execution resources."
So, once more: (I posted this here some time ago )

use
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