OT: Linux popularity

The whole point of this thread is that a lot of decision makers are going to be coming on line who simply do not hold these truths to be self evident. In
other words old wisdom will fly out the window. They won't have preconceived notions and they will have a large resivoir of experienced Linux users to tap. As we speak China Inc. is writing its own version of Linux. MicroSoft and Linux are on a much more even playing field in China. And China is the next big growth market.

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The simple facts are that if MS wanted to ensure only legitimate copies of MS exist, it would do it. It is quite easy in fact. The problem is that if they push for that, a HUUUGE number of people will move to Linux. In a world of high bandwidth and cheap storage you can download XP and Office in mean hours or less. All Microsoft is doing is preventing the inevitable, that is critical mass for Linux. For now large companies pretend to go for Linux and get huge discounts from Microsoft.
So that is point one.
The question now is: Is Linux upto scratch ? Well the answer in my opinion is Yes. You see MS is in the same trap SolidWorks is. Put new features or Fix old bugs. Well new features get you customers. Once you have them, you lock them in by ensuring your files are proprietary. Can use SolidWorks files with ProE. Do you wish you could. Well you're not getting it. So it's just market forces.
Microsoft XP is actually very stable, the blue screen of death is pretty much in the imagination of the Linux enthusiasts now. (at least on the desktop) But at the end of the day, Linux can afford to rid it self from bugs, add features and bug test for nothing when MS has to spend billions and introduce stupid features like "clippy" hoping to stay alive. Linux can avoid new features. If you want them, Linux is quite modular, you take the risk.
PS: There is one real factor that MS is gearing up for in my opinion ... legal challenges to every patent it owns. And it owns tens of thousands. I am sure the use of the letter "e" in emails is patented by MS or somebody MS can fund.
Giorgis

will
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huge discounts >from Microsoft.
But is this true of China?

proprietary.
How does the China market view "proprietary". China Inc. takes a very dim view of proprietary unless they hold the cards. China is still a state run government. If the government can't control something it won't succeed. It is viewed as not good for the people.
I just read an ad in Fortune that IBM paid for. The add was for Linux. Kind of makes you wonder why Bill forged a bond with Charles. Historically IBM and Dassault have been joined at the hip. Could it be that Gates sees a danger in Dassault being conviced by IBM to port Catia and its PLM solutions to Linux (which after all isn't a big stretch given Dassault's experience with Unix.) In an oblique way, Gates in my opinion is showing us that LInux is a real threat, a real competitor and therefore a real alternative.
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No, it may not be. China seems to us in the west so far away. Microsoft has tried to release it's code under NDAs so that you can audit it. But with millions of lines of code and paranoid fear it will be leakes the solution does not work.
They are in a trap. All they have now is a patent fight. I doubt that will work, but thay have a war chest like no other.
They better get started fast, because a patent fight might hurt Linix but not as much as they want. There are already billions invested in Linux world over, and MS will hurt all those billions of dollars. They have a voice as well.

Well a word document is proprietary, but who cares ... that is why MS will loose that battle.
But A SolidWorks or a CATIA format still has pulling power with little ability to reverse engineer. And when it happens, all that is required is create a new version and encript it.
Word is backward compatible, they have to be. My 2003 word ocument has to open in Word 2000 at least. I can save my Word 2003 documents in Word6 or WordPerfect. I cannot save my Solidworks 2005 in SW 2004.

Don't worry gates has even verbalised it that Linux is a threat now. It is obvious that Linux is keeping them honest. They are soon about to release an update to Explorer to regane some ground lost with Firfox. But they will be copying all the latest developments.
You have to look forward with SolidWorks. It may not make sence now but strategic moves need to be done early. And maybe going Linux with SolidWorks is a stupid move. I just don't know, I would like it but that is not business thinking
I feel that OSs will become irelevant soon. I think you will not know if you are running Linux or XP. It's just like skinnable MP3 players. Pick a skin and who knows what your running, thay all play MP3.
Giorgis
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Just go to Walmart, or your purchasing department.
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Giorgis wrote:

Microsoft isn't just gearing up for litigation, they're already issuing threats to Asian governments.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/biztech/11/19/tech.microsoft.linux3.reut/index.html
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I would also switch to Linux if there was decent affordable CAD for it, such as SW.
I keep Windurrs mainly just because of CAD....that's it. There seems to be tons of apps (often free) for almost everything else. Linux is awesome.
Has anyone tried running SW on Linux using something like VMware? Does it work? Is it slow?

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