Solidworks 2007 and Vista

We are locked into Solidworks 2007 for the next 2 years due to
program requirements.
Part of the program requirements is that we provide engineers to
our clients site.
To accomplish this we will be buying HP workstation laptops.
By default they come with Vista Business but HP will provide the XP
disks to us.
To fully utilise all the laptops ram we would need to stick with
Vista.
Have there been any problems with the combination of Solidworks
2007 and Vista?
Reply to
Phil Evans
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Phil, can you elaborate on this?
Is HP or is there a chart/graphic comparison you were given to show that Vista was better with ram over XP using SolidWorks?
Otherwise,.. who/what/where/how,.. is Vista utilizing the ram better, more efficient or different to use it over XP?
..
Reply to
zxys
Don't beleive everything people tell you ,especially when it comes to program requirements. Vista is a RAM HOG. You will definitely use all of the ram a laptop has with vista because it will use it ALL.
Yer better off with XP. There is a 2007 version for Vista, but it was beta. Ur better off with real released softwre. Your not missing anything by avoiding vista or 2008.
Daisy.
Reply to
PotFlower
It is my understanding, and please correct me if I am wrong, that Windows XP can only access a maximum of 4 gigs of ram. Vista 32 bit has the same limitation but Vista 64 bit can access 128 gigs of ram.
Reply to
Phil Evans
That's not what you said originally. If you're worried about that, why don't you get XP 64bit since I don't believe any vershon of SW exits curently that runs on vista64.
Daisy.
Reply to
PotFlower
Phil,
As Daisy has pointed out, if at all (I'm not positive) you need to have the SW2007 or SW2008 64 bit version and they're not available for Vista (maybe in alpha?).
You'll sol if you're wanting to run SW with more ram under Vista 64 bit at this time.
The only real benefit of using Vista on a laptop I believe is power management?
..
Reply to
zxys
well that solves that (non)problem then :-)
Thanks
Reply to
Phil Evans
Be sure to order the right HP systems. The new 8510w and 8710w will support the full 4GB RAM (max on notebooks) when running a 64-bit OS and there are drivers for WinXP-64 for both.
The older nw9440 and nw8440 will only recognize up to 3-3.5GB RAM - even if you use a 64-bit OS. I'm not sure if they even came out with drivers for XP-64 on these systems.
Reply to
jimsym
XP comes in a 64 bit flavor. I can't imagine running a model that big on a laptop. Either way, one issue with 64 bit has been drivers. This would be more of a problem with VISTA and especially with laptops.
I built a very nice "luggable" by attaching an LCD flat screen to the side of a mid tower.
Consider this:
Any laptop with that much ram is primarily tied to a power outlet. So buy them a 600 dollar laptop for Open Office and put the big bucks into a real computer and a soft padded aluminum case to carry it in.
TOP
Reply to
TOP
Phil,
What everyone seems to have missed is that yes solidworks will run under Vista 32 bit, BUT......
1,You will be using software OpenGL = slow, even if you get a driver working, it is still not very good.
2, You can NOT install service packs as Vista is not recognized by the Solidworks windows installer.
Been there, tried it!
Reply to
pete
Come on, you don't have amuch of a attention span, do yoy.
ogl drivcers are available for a bunch of Nvideo cards. They don't have to run in software ogl. How do I know? Because I'm using it That way. Dint read it in a magazine.
I bet yor the kind that uses a wrench to knock in nails. This is only true with the NON-VISTA versions. 2007 had a vista version beta, but I don't think there were any sps. 2008 hasnt had any sps yet.
Daisy
Reply to
PotFlower
HW accelerated drivers for SW2008 Vista32-bit have been certified for desktop nVidia Quadro FX cards. They are fast. The same drivers should work for 2007, too - even though they are not certified.
Notebook drivers have to be supplied by the manufacturer. Eventually, these will be tested and certified by SolidWorks. Until then, the drivers supplied by the notebook vendors should work - even if not perfectly.
Oddly enough, certification is no guarantee. According to SolidWorks website, Vista drivers have been certfied for ATI FireGL card, but in the Tech Bulletin about the drivers being availabe for the nVidia cards, they state that the ATI drivers are unstable and not recommended.
Similarly, all of the qualitative recommendations re older video cards and SW2008 RealView that were included in the Beta software readme are gone. Now even cards that were supposedly not recommended for SW2008 are listed as "passing all tests.
So, the question is, what is the value of certification if certified drivers can still be unstable and not recommended?
Reply to
jimsym
I would wait to upgrade hardware and OS till SP1 comes out for Vista (possibly 2nd half 2007). By that time, SW08 should have a few SP's themselves and CPU/GPU prices should be down a bit. If you have to upgrade, I would stick with XP. Vista is pretty and will probably be pretty fast with 10x the RAM, but the performance just isn't there.
Josh
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Reply to
solidsmack
I can tel from that that you don't really use it. Vista and 2008 are axually faster than xp ad 2007. It takes more ram but its a little faster. What is it witht all these know it alls who read something somewhere and then say it back, even when it wanst right to begin with.
Daisy
Reply to
PotFlower
Pot,
Neither did I read it in a magazine, I tried it, on a Dell M70 Laptop.
The Dell driver did not work, even the Forceware drivers do not work well, but better than the dell.
No mention of Solidworks 2007 Vista, in the original post, only Solidworks 2007.
It pays to read the post that is being answered first, you know, paying attention!
You seem to be spending too time, putting people down, rather than concentrating on giving advice.
Hmm...reading your recent posts, you are beginning to sound like someone in San Diego, CA, it must be catching, lol
Have a Nice day!
:-P
Reply to
pete
Pete,
You need to clarify that it did not work for you in your particular situation with a Dell M70.
That is where some of us have an issue. A lot of people are talking the line of a year or more ago with Vista and Open GL drivers, performance, etc. At that time the statements may have been true with their particular hardware and software.
The hardware and software people are not standing still and are delivering product that works well with Vista.
Cheers,
Anna Wood
Reply to
Anna Wood
yeah. I see. its easy to make excuses after youv already said something stupid. maybe you should keep your trap shut unless you know what your taking about.,
Daisy
Reply to
PotFlower
Below is quoted from the SolidWorks Customer Portal (Subscription required). The first article under "News and Tech Alerts"
"9/21/2007 Support for Windows Vista 64-bit SolidWorks 2008 software is currently supported on the following Microsoft Windows Operating Systems: XP Professional (x32), XP Professional (x64), Vista Business (x32) and Vista Ultimate edition (x32).
Please note that the 64-bit (x64) versions of Windows Vista are not currently supported, nor is the use of the x32 version of SolidWorks 2008 with x64 Vista versions. Furthermore, installation of the x32 version of SolidWorks 2008 on an x64 Vista Operating System is blocked, since this is not currently a supported configuration."
- - Personaly I don't see any point what what so ever of installing SolidWorks on 32 bit Vista. When SolidWorks will run on 64bit Vista I will consider upgrading, for the extra RAM, but only after 2 or 3 service packs from SolidWorks.
John Layne
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Reply to
John Layne
PotFlower wrote in news:47026af0$0$26426$ snipped-for-privacy@free.teranews.com:
Posted by someone who can't even read correctly....hrm..
Reply to
Anthony
I'll second that. SWX2008 + Vista Ultimate are faster overall.
With SWX2008 loaded with a small file open I'm using about 1.1G of physical memory.
Reply to
Wonderman

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